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Val (Zebedee)

Thinking of getting your 1st husky? Read this!

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awwhh thats a great decision chantelle, all dogs can be hard work, they all have their own character and temprement, its all about loving them as they are, one thing i learnt was instead of blaming my dog for jumping up to the kitchen side while am sorting food etc just take her away from the situation instead to stop it happening, thats what its all about, making sure situations dont arise, for eg, my kids make a sarni and while they turn their back to get a drink etc the dog will no doubt try and get the snack, so i tell them to make sure they close the door.. that way your not always blaming the dog for being naughty, its jus instinct.. our luna has jus come into her first season, i cant believe it she is still my baby, 8 mths, seems too young, each day is a new experience, i would say that ive heard sibs arent very affectionate, they will lay on the floor next to you, but not necessarily curl up next to you on the sofa, our luna follows us everywhere, and i often fall over her.. good luck, you wont regret it, u jus got to deciede a girl or boy now lol:congrats::kimba2::kimba2:

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Sarah had not had any dogs at all in the past, but she was always coming down to ours when we had Saskia and then when we had Wolf so she had a bit of insight to the breed through our dogs.

We have been very lucky as Saskia has been an angel!!! she is very very quiet, in fact I think she is not really a husky but is dressed in husky costume really LOL. Wolf was more challenging as he was very, very nervous when we got him at 7 and a half months old. I then got my proper insight to the Husky world. He has now turned out to be very laid back with us and I believe Saskia has helped train him. I really do believe that its the training that moulds these dogs and every effort to do this well, is well worth it.

I have and still am somewhat nervous around dogs I dont know, but my 2 have helped me with this too.

I can't believe Saskia is 8 this year and Wolf is now 5. How time flies!!.

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:angry:

Thats exactly how I approached it! Im really NOT a kiddy person I dont feel maternal towards them AT ALL! BUT I have all the maternal instinct in the world for my husky baby! And if I do say so myself I think I'm a firm but fair and loving husky mum!

I had never owned a dog before but was reasonabley experienced around them being a dog walker, but your right their totally different to your average Lab or collie! And one of the worst things is people who dont have or know a sibe just DONT get it! They look at me like I'm nuts when I say "sorry I cant come down the pub I've got to take care of Nukka" coz she is like having a toddler and I love her like one! :D

PhotoHusky8.jpg

Breed:

Siberian Husky

Owner Level:

For experienced involved dog owners

Average Life Span:

10-14 years

Average Weight:

Male are generally 45 to 60 pounds

Females are generally 35 to 50 pounds

Average Height:

Males are generally 21 to 23 1/2 inches at the withers

Females are generally 20 to 22 inches at the withers

Color And Coat:

Coat color types ranges from: Pure white, gray, red, sable, agouti (guard hair is banded with black near the root and at the tip with a yellow or beige band at the center of the hair), jet black/white

Grooming is mainly brushing bathing etc. If you don't like dog hair, don't get a Siberian Husky. This dog is equipped with excessive fur to survive sub zero temperatures. The insulating downy undercoat sheds in early to late spring. They shed a little all year round.

Siberians also have a variety of eye colors. Many are spellbinding with their beauty. Eye colors: Varied hues of coppery to brown chocolate brown, icy blue, or bi-color, which is one brown and one blue eye.

Typical Health Problems:

Hip dysplasia is definitely seen in this breed but in a moderate frequency level. Eyes disorders are a seen in this breed and are all of a serious nature. The most common are: Hereditary or juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma. Each disorder occurs in a different portion of the eye, and can occur in any eye color. These disorders can result in blindness and lead to other life threatening health problems. Treatments and corrective surgeries, if possible, are costly. Yearly eye exams are a must.

History and Personality:

Originally bred by the nomadic peoples of the Chukchi Tribe, of Siberia. The Siberian Husky was developed to provide transportation over the vast frozen land. This tough, strong medium size dog was able to quickly cover long distances on very little food. They were bred to have a gentle nature and were a intrigal part of everyday family life. The relationship born of mutual need and nurtured by mutual respect existed between this dog and the Chukchi people. The Siberian lived in isolation for centuries before the outside world discovered it and bought it to other regions. The present day Siberian Husky has changed a lot since entering this country around 1900, but with in the current Siberian Husky breed the heart and drive of the beloved and much prized, Chukchi dog still lives.

Today's Siberian is a beautiful, captivating, eager, outgoing, animated canine companion.They have the ability to charm and hold captive the hearts of many. Their abilities in addition to companion animals are: Sledding, carting, running companion, agility, obedience. This breed has many charms, however they also have strong and difficult behaviors that require a special effort for successful ownership.

PhotoHusky3.jpg

Why are these dogs typically in animal shelters?

The majority of Siberian Huskies in shelters arrive there as strays. Owner turn-ins of this breed to shelters are due to a variety of reasons. Currently, one of the most common reasons is that the owner can not, or better put, will not keep the dog home. These dogs are difficult to contain and that requires; work and financial commitment, on the owners part. Other common reasons that owners leave their Siberian at a shelter are:

Owner's inability to provide for this breed's emotional needs, companionship needs, socializing, and training requirements, and improper behaviors. Improper behaviors usually develop out of frustration, lack of proper training, and inadequate exercise and generally range from: House training, excessive activity level, digging, property damage, noise. Many owners have a clear lack of understanding of this unique breed, which results in the dog ending its days in a shelter facility. Please make sure you are in a stable life pattern before acquiring a Siberian Husky. A new baby in the house and child versus dog are also common reasons why these dogs are in shelters. Owners moving is a regular turn-in reason also. A lot of rentals and neighborhoods will not be Siberian Husky compatible. These dogs as adults are very hard to find good compatible homes for, so make sure you can make a lifetime commitment. Some Siberians arrive at shelters because of owner neglect. This breed is not for the impatient owner. Impatience, misunderstanding, and a desire by owners to make the Siberian Husky conform to, what it can not, will sometimes lead to abuse.

PhotoHusky5.jpg

Who should own this breed?

This fun loving, affectionate, outgoing, breed requires an experienced, committed, stable owner that has educated themselves well on this breed's needs. Siberian owners should be aware of this dog's amazing natural abilities and desires. They should also know that those abilities and desires, if not channeled and use will become a problem. The Siberian Husky attracts a lot of people because of it's beauty. They are also adorable puppies and win people's hearts in an instant. Many uneducated, puppy smitten owners soon find out this is not the breed for everyone. This is a fantastic, but very specialized breed that requires a special owner to be successful.

Siberian Huskies are high energy. Always look to a dogs historical roots and modern jobs for insight. These dogs were originally bred to run in sub zero temperatures for long distances and still do. Their endurance and desire to go is not the correct match for the average pet owner. But for many Siberian owners, this breed becomes a lifelong passion of the heart and they would own no other.



  • They need the company of other dogs or of people at all times. If you work all day, or have room for only one dog, don't get a Siberian. Loneliness for this breed equals TROUBLE. A lonely Siberian Husky will display a full spectrum of undesirable behaviors.

  • Siberian Huskies have a pretty common trait for digging holes in backyards. If you take great pride in your landscaping efforts, a Siberian is not for you.

  • While capable of strong affection for his family, the Siberian Husky is also very friendly with strangers and make poor watch dogs. A Siberian will not alert his owner to strangers. They are usually pretty happy to see just about everyone. Which I see as a positive for the Siberian. An owner is not bothered with irritating barking every time someone enters or passes by his property.

  • The breed in general is not good with: Cats or any small animals, rodents, birds or fowl, because of their prey drive instinct. There are of course exceptions, but don't count on it. If you desire to have or currently own such pets do not get a Siberian Husky.

    PhotoHusky6.jpg

  • Siberian Huskies are vocal. They rarely bark, but will whine, or moan, and also chirp and howl. Head held high, they will produce one of the most haunting song like sounds. Now this Siberian song fest may be music to the ears of a Siberian and the Siberian Husky fancier, but the neighborhood may not agree.

  • Siberian Huskies shed a lot. When they blow coat in the spring it is a lot like a doggie hair storm. Brushing helps and you can speed the shedding up with a warm bath. But if you don't like fur all over the house, the car, the furniture and if you don't want to match you wardrobe to you dogs coat color, you don't want to get a Siberian.

  • Siberian Huskies need a lot of exercise. They have a high endurance level and need a owner that wants to keep up with them. Huskies love to do what they were bred for, so being involved in Siberian Husky sledding, carting and other events or breed clubs is a plus for the dog and the owner. Obedience and agility are also good outlets and activities for the Siberian Husky and owner. They can make good walking/running partners, if the weather is not to warm.

  • Siberian Huskies have a tremendous desire to RUN. But the very first dash that a puppy makes could be it's last. These dogs should never be allowed to run at large. They face too many hazards in today's world: Cars, other dogs, guns, poison, antifreeze. In addition, they can come in contact with diseases: Parvo, distemper, corona, parasites. The clever Siberian Husky can surely add to that list, easily. They also have a strong prey drive. A gentle family Siberian Husky, at large can inflict, death or injury to livestock, fowl, cats, and wildlife. These mis-adventures could cost you some time in court , large sums of money and ultimately cost your dog, it's life. A Siberian, for their own protection, should be kept confined or under control at all times.

  • Siberians are escape artists. Some can be contained in 6 foot fencing. Others can clear an 8 foot fence like they have wings. Most Siberian Huskies require completely enclosed kennels to keep them where they are safe when they are not being supervised. Each Siberian Husky varies, but in general this breed is a lot of work to contain. The Siberian is the "Houdini escape artist" of the dog world.

PhotoHusky4.jpg

Is this breed good with children?

Children and dogs should never be left alone and unattended, even for a moment. Young children do not have proper dog etiquette, and dogs do not understand a child's behavior. This can result in tragedy with any breed of dog. The Siberian can be a good older child companion, but that greatly varies on training, socializing and energy level. So, each dog and child relationship should be considered individually.

Is this breed good with other dogs in general?

Siberian Huskies generally do well with other dogs if they have been socialized. Generally this breed displays friendly, playful interest in most dogs. If attacked, however, they will readily defend themselves. This breed has a team or pack mentality and they prefer generally to have a human or dog companion with them at all times. Spaying/neutering is one of the most important keys to having a dog-friendly animal. Pack position and socialization is important and will affect and vary each dog's acceptance of other dogs. Huskies also have a strong prey drive and some may not prove compatible with small dogs. A small dog or any cat should not be left alone with a Siberian Husky.

PhotoHusky7.jpg

How easy is training and house training with this breed?

Huskies are very intelligent, but are not easily channeled to jobs they dislike or have no interest in. Like humans each dog's abilities, likes and dislikes will vary. Give a Siberian Husky a job he is bred for and he will excel. Put him in obedience classes and the results will vary greatly. Training a Siberian Husky to some tasks can be painstaking, but worth the effort. Good training gives all dogs the ability to speak the same language with us. Keeping your Siberian Husky stimulated, busy and happy is the most important thing, not that he be the best at any task. The committed owner can indeed obedience train their Siberian Husky. If you are looking for a captivating, joyful, free spirited friend, look to the Siberian Husky. If you are looking for a dog with a natural desire for obedience, a Siberian Husky, is not for you.

The time required to house train a Siberian will vary depending on each dog and on the method used. Strong positive methods and consistency will work best for training with this breed. Crate training seems to be of great assistance for most dogs in housebreaking. Siberians are in general not safe to leave loose in your house unattended. Crating, if they are not being supervised, is reccommended. Do not leave a Siberian alone in your car uncrated unless you know the dog well. They, like a lot of dogs, can eat a car seat in a few minutes.

Socializing this breed?

Socialization is one of the necessary requirements to successful dog ownership. This breed thrives in dog and human activities. They need company like they need food and water. Socialization and social activity for these dogs is mandatory to maintain a happy, well balanced and almost well behaved Siberian Husky.

well written ...people read it but sadly choose to ignore it ...they think its nonsense or they think they know better ...and we all know what happens then ..dont we !!

:angry:

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yes ...non husky people think we are nuts ...well if thats what bieng nuts is ...im happy :)

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totally agree,have had dogs all my life,from labradors to staffies and 3 GSD's totally wasnt expecting this from our husky baby,good thing is, hardly watch tv now its all feed,walk,play,well i say walk i did mean run ..haha trying her on a Halti head collar at the weekend:confused:

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Now this is going to sound so Nieve. I was one of those girls who loved the breed from their looks. Ever since I saw one at Xmas pulling Santa's seigh when I was 6. I decided that I wanted one.

I was brought up with a Alsatian but obviously I didn't have any part in the care.

My hubby has never had a dog only cats so a dog was not our first plan.

We have two children who don't have much experience around dogs.

after a family loss I found functioning hard and was quiet depressed.

thats when on a wim we got our first dog. A 15week old husky.

BIG BIG shock?

I don't have any real experience but I would say do your research, a husky is not just for Xmas . I love her to pieces and would not change my decision to get a husky.

Maybe I would have planned it more though.

I have had a steep learning cure to climb. (Sooooooooooooo much poop.)

And a lot of u have helped me with advice.

now beau is 19weeks and is a part of the family as much as anyone else.

Although pack order is being challenged, she is a clever pup so will get there.

so do your research prior, but if u commit to them and give them time, guidance and love they are a fantastic dog full of life and love.

I love her xxxx

post-8860-13586082807761_thumb.jpg

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Ive always loved Huskies and wanted one ever since i was a kid. Zeus is almost 2 now and was my first dog. I researched the breed intensely as I knew they required a lot of love and attention....but all the research in the world will never prepare you for the actual experience. Its one i was prepared for though and nothing can compare for the delight they bring to your life. I now have 2 who is Zeus' brother - Hades from the same breeder. Everyone thought i was crazy for getting another one but it just goes to show that if you are prepared to put in the hard work its more than the rewards are plenty.

It makes me sad that there are more and more Huskys showing up in dogs homes due to people who are blinded by their beauty and ignorant to their needs. There are so many in Manchester dogs homes where i live and its even been on the news.

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I was in the fortunate position of having cared for someone elses two huskies before deciding to get my own.

They were fantastic boys. Really well behaved and well mannered. It was a great example and something to aspire to with my own. Unfortunately Togo is a bit of a twonk and isn't as good as my two adoptive boys were. But that's my fault, I'm to soft.

Anyway, here's a pic of the boys together

post-1752-13586083216402_thumb.jpg

Edited by Povodny

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I totally agree,it is very sad that so many beautiful huskies are now appearing in dog homes. I waited 10 years before I got one. Made sure I did loads of reasearch, had a well fenced in garden and time to spend with my beloved sibe. I love lots of exercise , we run, walk and he loves to run with me on my bike. Next year he will be coming on holiday with us. He goes everywhere with us. I would'nt have it any other way. He's my best friend. Oh and he also loves going to dog agility, and yes you most be firm with them, you are the pack leader!!!

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I was in the fortunate position of having cared for someone elses two huskies before deciding to get my own.

They were fantastic boys. Really well behaved and well mannered. It was a great example and something to aspire to with my own. Unfortunately Togo is a bit of a twonk and isn't as good as my two adoptive boys were. But that's my fault, I'm to soft.

Anyway, here's a pic of the boys together

 I agree with you here about other days not being like your own. A friend of mine has two which quite happily plod around the park. Fortunately though I knew enough that this was not typical, and every day I'm thinking how to improve Storm walking beside me. He's a hundred times better than when I got him, but I'm always trying to get inside his head and come up with solutions. He's getting there (I think)!

:dog3:

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http://www.facebook.com/HelpMeGetAHuskeyPuppy?fref=ts

 

Just came by this, part of me wanted to ask what he knew about the breed and tell him that there is a very small chance of getting a puppy (as in 8-16 weeks) at a rescue (which he mentioned) if it's looks mainly Husky, anyone with a pup would sell it or if their responsible find a good home themselves. I didn't though because I still don't have a lot of first hand experience despite the research I did beforehand. I'm not in a position to judge and for all I know he could be wonderful owner. Time will only tell...

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its very well written and tells the needs an :pawprint:d personality of the "husky" perfectly ....if only people would believe what they have read there would,nt be so many rescue "huskies" ....xx

PhotoHusky8.jpg

Breed:

Siberian Husky



Owner Level:

For experienced involved dog owners



Average Life Span:

10-14 years



Average Weight:

Male are generally 45 to 60 pounds

Females are generally 35 to 50 pounds



Average Height:

Males are generally 21 to 23 1/2 inches at the withers

Females are generally 20 to 22 inches at the withers



Color And Coat:

Coat color types ranges from: Pure white, gray, red, sable, agouti (guard hair is banded with black near the root and at the tip with a yellow or beige band at the center of the hair), jet black/white



Grooming is mainly brushing bathing etc. If you don't like dog hair, don't get a Siberian Husky. This dog is equipped with excessive fur to survive sub zero temperatures. The insulating downy undercoat sheds in early to late spring. They shed a little all year round.



Siberians also have a variety of eye colors. Many are spellbinding with their beauty. Eye colors: Varied hues of coppery to brown chocolate brown, icy blue, or bi-color, which is one brown and one blue eye.



Typical Health Problems:

Hip dysplasia is definitely seen in this breed but in a moderate frequency level. Eyes disorders are a seen in this breed and are all of a serious nature. The most common are: Hereditary or juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma. Each disorder occurs in a different portion of the eye, and can occur in any eye color. These disorders can result in blindness and lead to other life threatening health problems. Treatments and corrective surgeries, if possible, are costly. Yearly eye exams are a must.




History and Personality:

Originally bred by the nomadic peoples of the Chukchi Tribe, of Siberia. The Siberian Husky was developed to provide transportation over the vast frozen land. This tough, strong medium size dog was able to quickly cover long distances on very little food. They were bred to have a gentle nature and were a intrigal part of everyday family life. The relationship born of mutual need and nurtured by mutual respect existed between this dog and the Chukchi people. The Siberian lived in isolation for centuries before the outside world discovered it and bought it to other regions. The present day Siberian Husky has changed a lot since entering this country around 1900, but with in the current Siberian Husky breed the heart and drive of the beloved and much prized, Chukchi dog still lives.



Today's Siberian is a beautiful, captivating, eager, outgoing, animated canine companion.They have the ability to charm and hold captive the hearts of many. Their abilities in addition to companion animals are: Sledding, carting, running companion, agility, obedience. This breed has many charms, however they also have strong and difficult behaviors that require a special effort for successful ownership.




PhotoHusky3.jpg

Why are these dogs typically in animal shelters?

The majority of Siberian Huskies in shelters arrive there as strays. Owner turn-ins of this breed to shelters are due to a variety of reasons. Currently, one of the most common reasons is that the owner can not, or better put, will not keep the dog home. These dogs are difficult to contain and that requires; work and financial commitment, on the owners part. Other common reasons that owners leave their Siberian at a shelter are:



Owner's inability to provide for this breed's emotional needs, companionship needs, socializing, and training requirements, and improper behaviors. Improper behaviors usually develop out of frustration, lack of proper training, and inadequate exercise and generally range from: House training, excessive activity level, digging, property damage, noise. Many owners have a clear lack of understanding of this unique breed, which results in the dog ending its days in a shelter facility. Please make sure you are in a stable life pattern before acquiring a Siberian Husky. A new baby in the house and child versus dog are also common reasons why these dogs are in shelters. Owners moving is a regular turn-in reason also. A lot of rentals and neighborhoods will not be Siberian Husky compatible. These dogs as adults are very hard to find good compatible homes for, so make sure you can make a lifetime commitment. Some Siberians arrive at shelters because of owner neglect. This breed is not for the impatient owner. Impatience, misunderstanding, and a desire by owners to make the Siberian Husky conform to, what it can not, will sometimes lead to abuse.




PhotoHusky5.jpg

Who should own this breed?

This fun loving, affectionate, outgoing, breed requires an experienced, committed, stable owner that has educated themselves well on this breed's needs. Siberian owners should be aware of this dog's amazing natural abilities and desires. They should also know that those abilities and desires, if not channeled and use will become a problem. The Siberian Husky attracts a lot of people because of it's beauty. They are also adorable puppies and win people's hearts in an instant. Many uneducated, puppy smitten owners soon find out this is not the breed for everyone. This is a fantastic, but very specialized breed that requires a special owner to be successful.



Siberian Huskies are high energy. Always look to a dogs historical roots and modern jobs for insight. These dogs were originally bred to run in sub zero temperatures for long distances and still do. Their endurance and desire to go is not the correct match for the average pet owner. But for many Siberian owners, this breed becomes a lifelong passion of the heart and they would own no other.

  • They need the company of other dogs or of people at all times. If you work all day, or have room for only one dog, don't get a Siberian. Loneliness for this breed equals TROUBLE. A lonely Siberian Husky will display a full spectrum of undesirable behaviors.
  • Siberian Huskies have a pretty common trait for digging holes in backyards. If you take great pride in your landscaping efforts, a Siberian is not for you.
  • While capable of strong affection for his family, the Siberian Husky is also very friendly with strangers and make poor watch dogs. A Siberian will not alert his owner to strangers. They are usually pretty happy to see just about everyone. Which I see as a positive for the Siberian. An owner is not bothered with irritating barking every time someone enters or passes by his property.
  • The breed in general is not good with: Cats or any small animals, rodents, birds or fowl, because of their prey drive instinct. There are of course exceptions, but don't count on it. If you desire to have or currently own such pets do not get a Siberian Husky.



    PhotoHusky6.jpg
  • Siberian Huskies are vocal. They rarely bark, but will whine, or moan, and also chirp and howl. Head held high, they will produce one of the most haunting song like sounds. Now this Siberian song fest may be music to the ears of a Siberian and the Siberian Husky fancier, but the neighborhood may not agree.
  • Siberian Huskies shed a lot. When they blow coat in the spring it is a lot like a doggie hair storm. Brushing helps and you can speed the shedding up with a warm bath. But if you don't like fur all over the house, the car, the furniture and if you don't want to match you wardrobe to you dogs coat color, you don't want to get a Siberian.
  • Siberian Huskies need a lot of exercise. They have a high endurance level and need a owner that wants to keep up with them. Huskies love to do what they were bred for, so being involved in Siberian Husky sledding, carting and other events or breed clubs is a plus for the dog and the owner. Obedience and agility are also good outlets and activities for the Siberian Husky and owner. They can make good walking/running partners, if the weather is not to warm.
  • Siberian Huskies have a tremendous desire to RUN. But the very first dash that a puppy makes could be it's last. These dogs should never be allowed to run at large. They face too many hazards in today's world: Cars, other dogs, guns, poison, antifreeze. In addition, they can come in contact with diseases: Parvo, distemper, corona, parasites. The clever Siberian Husky can surely add to that list, easily. They also have a strong prey drive. A gentle family Siberian Husky, at large can inflict, death or injury to livestock, fowl, cats, and wildlife. These mis-adventures could cost you some time in court , large sums of money and ultimately cost your dog, it's life. A Siberian, for their own protection, should be kept confined or under control at all times.
  • Siberians are escape artists. Some can be contained in 6 foot fencing. Others can clear an 8 foot fence like they have wings. Most Siberian Huskies require completely enclosed kennels to keep them where they are safe when they are not being supervised. Each Siberian Husky varies, but in general this breed is a lot of work to contain. The Siberian is the "Houdini escape artist" of the dog world.
PhotoHusky4.jpg

Is this breed good with children?

Children and dogs should never be left alone and unattended, even for a moment. Young children do not have proper dog etiquette, and dogs do not understand a child's behavior. This can result in tragedy with any breed of dog. The Siberian can be a good older child companion, but that greatly varies on training, socializing and energy level. So, each dog and child relationship should be considered individually.



Is this breed good with other dogs in general?

Siberian Huskies generally do well with other dogs if they have been socialized. Generally this breed displays friendly, playful interest in most dogs. If attacked, however, they will readily defend themselves. This breed has a team or pack mentality and they prefer generally to have a human or dog companion with them at all times. Spaying/neutering is one of the most important keys to having a dog-friendly animal. Pack position and socialization is important and will affect and vary each dog's acceptance of other dogs. Huskies also have a strong prey drive and some may not prove compatible with small dogs. A small dog or any cat should not be left alone with a Siberian Husky.




PhotoHusky7.jpg

How easy is training and house training with this breed?

Huskies are very intelligent, but are not easily channeled to jobs they dislike or have no interest in. Like humans each dog's abilities, likes and dislikes will vary. Give a Siberian Husky a job he is bred for and he will excel. Put him in obedience classes and the results will vary greatly. Training a Siberian Husky to some tasks can be painstaking, but worth the effort. Good training gives all dogs the ability to speak the same language with us. Keeping your Siberian Husky stimulated, busy and happy is the most important thing, not that he be the best at any task. The committed owner can indeed obedience train their Siberian Husky. If you are looking for a captivating, joyful, free spirited friend, look to the Siberian Husky. If you are looking for a dog with a natural desire for obedience, a Siberian Husky, is not for you.



The time required to house train a Siberian will vary depending on each dog and on the method used. Strong positive methods and consistency will work best for training with this breed. Crate training seems to be of great assistance for most dogs in housebreaking. Siberians are in general not safe to leave loose in your house unattended. Crating, if they are not being supervised, is reccommended. Do not leave a Siberian alone in your car uncrated unless you know the dog well. They, like a lot of dogs, can eat a car seat in a few minutes.



Socializing this breed?

Socialization is one of the necessary requirements to successful dog ownership. This breed thrives in dog and human activities. They need company like they need food and water. Socialization and social activity for these dogs is mandatory to maintain a happy, well balanced and almost well behaved Siberian Husky.

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its very well written and tells the needs an :pawprint:d personality of the "husky" perfectly ....if only people would believe what they have read there would,nt be so many rescue "huskies" ....xx

PhotoHusky8.jpg

Breed:

Siberian Husky



Owner Level:

For experienced involved dog owners



Average Life Span:

10-14 years



Average Weight:

Male are generally 45 to 60 pounds

Females are generally 35 to 50 pounds



Average Height:

Males are generally 21 to 23 1/2 inches at the withers

Females are generally 20 to 22 inches at the withers



Color And Coat:

Coat color types ranges from: Pure white, gray, red, sable, agouti (guard hair is banded with black near the root and at the tip with a yellow or beige band at the center of the hair), jet black/white



Grooming is mainly brushing bathing etc. If you don't like dog hair, don't get a Siberian Husky. This dog is equipped with excessive fur to survive sub zero temperatures. The insulating downy undercoat sheds in early to late spring. They shed a little all year round.



Siberians also have a variety of eye colors. Many are spellbinding with their beauty. Eye colors: Varied hues of coppery to brown chocolate brown, icy blue, or bi-color, which is one brown and one blue eye.



Typical Health Problems:

Hip dysplasia is definitely seen in this breed but in a moderate frequency level. Eyes disorders are a seen in this breed and are all of a serious nature. The most common are: Hereditary or juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma. Each disorder occurs in a different portion of the eye, and can occur in any eye color. These disorders can result in blindness and lead to other life threatening health problems. Treatments and corrective surgeries, if possible, are costly. Yearly eye exams are a must.




History and Personality:

Originally bred by the nomadic peoples of the Chukchi Tribe, of Siberia. The Siberian Husky was developed to provide transportation over the vast frozen land. This tough, strong medium size dog was able to quickly cover long distances on very little food. They were bred to have a gentle nature and were a intrigal part of everyday family life. The relationship born of mutual need and nurtured by mutual respect existed between this dog and the Chukchi people. The Siberian lived in isolation for centuries before the outside world discovered it and bought it to other regions. The present day Siberian Husky has changed a lot since entering this country around 1900, but with in the current Siberian Husky breed the heart and drive of the beloved and much prized, Chukchi dog still lives.



Today's Siberian is a beautiful, captivating, eager, outgoing, animated canine companion.They have the ability to charm and hold captive the hearts of many. Their abilities in addition to companion animals are: Sledding, carting, running companion, agility, obedience. This breed has many charms, however they also have strong and difficult behaviors that require a special effort for successful ownership.




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Why are these dogs typically in animal shelters?

The majority of Siberian Huskies in shelters arrive there as strays. Owner turn-ins of this breed to shelters are due to a variety of reasons. Currently, one of the most common reasons is that the owner can not, or better put, will not keep the dog home. These dogs are difficult to contain and that requires; work and financial commitment, on the owners part. Other common reasons that owners leave their Siberian at a shelter are:



Owner's inability to provide for this breed's emotional needs, companionship needs, socializing, and training requirements, and improper behaviors. Improper behaviors usually develop out of frustration, lack of proper training, and inadequate exercise and generally range from: House training, excessive activity level, digging, property damage, noise. Many owners have a clear lack of understanding of this unique breed, which results in the dog ending its days in a shelter facility. Please make sure you are in a stable life pattern before acquiring a Siberian Husky. A new baby in the house and child versus dog are also common reasons why these dogs are in shelters. Owners moving is a regular turn-in reason also. A lot of rentals and neighborhoods will not be Siberian Husky compatible. These dogs as adults are very hard to find good compatible homes for, so make sure you can make a lifetime commitment. Some Siberians arrive at shelters because of owner neglect. This breed is not for the impatient owner. Impatience, misunderstanding, and a desire by owners to make the Siberian Husky conform to, what it can not, will sometimes lead to abuse.




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Who should own this breed?

This fun loving, affectionate, outgoing, breed requires an experienced, committed, stable owner that has educated themselves well on this breed's needs. Siberian owners should be aware of this dog's amazing natural abilities and desires. They should also know that those abilities and desires, if not channeled and use will become a problem. The Siberian Husky attracts a lot of people because of it's beauty. They are also adorable puppies and win people's hearts in an instant. Many uneducated, puppy smitten owners soon find out this is not the breed for everyone. This is a fantastic, but very specialized breed that requires a special owner to be successful.



Siberian Huskies are high energy. Always look to a dogs historical roots and modern jobs for insight. These dogs were originally bred to run in sub zero temperatures for long distances and still do. Their endurance and desire to go is not the correct match for the average pet owner. But for many Siberian owners, this breed becomes a lifelong passion of the heart and they would own no other.

  • They need the company of other dogs or of people at all times. If you work all day, or have room for only one dog, don't get a Siberian. Loneliness for this breed equals TROUBLE. A lonely Siberian Husky will display a full spectrum of undesirable behaviors.
  • Siberian Huskies have a pretty common trait for digging holes in backyards. If you take great pride in your landscaping efforts, a Siberian is not for you.
  • While capable of strong affection for his family, the Siberian Husky is also very friendly with strangers and make poor watch dogs. A Siberian will not alert his owner to strangers. They are usually pretty happy to see just about everyone. Which I see as a positive for the Siberian. An owner is not bothered with irritating barking every time someone enters or passes by his property.
  • The breed in general is not good with: Cats or any small animals, rodents, birds or fowl, because of their prey drive instinct. There are of course exceptions, but don't count on it. If you desire to have or currently own such pets do not get a Siberian Husky.



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  • Siberian Huskies are vocal. They rarely bark, but will whine, or moan, and also chirp and howl. Head held high, they will produce one of the most haunting song like sounds. Now this Siberian song fest may be music to the ears of a Siberian and the Siberian Husky fancier, but the neighborhood may not agree.
  • Siberian Huskies shed a lot. When they blow coat in the spring it is a lot like a doggie hair storm. Brushing helps and you can speed the shedding up with a warm bath. But if you don't like fur all over the house, the car, the furniture and if you don't want to match you wardrobe to you dogs coat color, you don't want to get a Siberian.
  • Siberian Huskies need a lot of exercise. They have a high endurance level and need a owner that wants to keep up with them. Huskies love to do what they were bred for, so being involved in Siberian Husky sledding, carting and other events or breed clubs is a plus for the dog and the owner. Obedience and agility are also good outlets and activities for the Siberian Husky and owner. They can make good walking/running partners, if the weather is not to warm.
  • Siberian Huskies have a tremendous desire to RUN. But the very first dash that a puppy makes could be it's last. These dogs should never be allowed to run at large. They face too many hazards in today's world: Cars, other dogs, guns, poison, antifreeze. In addition, they can come in contact with diseases: Parvo, distemper, corona, parasites. The clever Siberian Husky can surely add to that list, easily. They also have a strong prey drive. A gentle family Siberian Husky, at large can inflict, death or injury to livestock, fowl, cats, and wildlife. These mis-adventures could cost you some time in court , large sums of money and ultimately cost your dog, it's life. A Siberian, for their own protection, should be kept confined or under control at all times.
  • Siberians are escape artists. Some can be contained in 6 foot fencing. Others can clear an 8 foot fence like they have wings. Most Siberian Huskies require completely enclosed kennels to keep them where they are safe when they are not being supervised. Each Siberian Husky varies, but in general this breed is a lot of work to contain. The Siberian is the "Houdini escape artist" of the dog world.
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Is this breed good with children?

Children and dogs should never be left alone and unattended, even for a moment. Young children do not have proper dog etiquette, and dogs do not understand a child's behavior. This can result in tragedy with any breed of dog. The Siberian can be a good older child companion, but that greatly varies on training, socializing and energy level. So, each dog and child relationship should be considered individually.



Is this breed good with other dogs in general?

Siberian Huskies generally do well with other dogs if they have been socialized. Generally this breed displays friendly, playful interest in most dogs. If attacked, however, they will readily defend themselves. This breed has a team or pack mentality and they prefer generally to have a human or dog companion with them at all times. Spaying/neutering is one of the most important keys to having a dog-friendly animal. Pack position and socialization is important and will affect and vary each dog's acceptance of other dogs. Huskies also have a strong prey drive and some may not prove compatible with small dogs. A small dog or any cat should not be left alone with a Siberian Husky.




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How easy is training and house training with this breed?

Huskies are very intelligent, but are not easily channeled to jobs they dislike or have no interest in. Like humans each dog's abilities, likes and dislikes will vary. Give a Siberian Husky a job he is bred for and he will excel. Put him in obedience classes and the results will vary greatly. Training a Siberian Husky to some tasks can be painstaking, but worth the effort. Good training gives all dogs the ability to speak the same language with us. Keeping your Siberian Husky stimulated, busy and happy is the most important thing, not that he be the best at any task. The committed owner can indeed obedience train their Siberian Husky. If you are looking for a captivating, joyful, free spirited friend, look to the Siberian Husky. If you are looking for a dog with a natural desire for obedience, a Siberian Husky, is not for you.



The time required to house train a Siberian will vary depending on each dog and on the method used. Strong positive methods and consistency will work best for training with this breed. Crate training seems to be of great assistance for most dogs in housebreaking. Siberians are in general not safe to leave loose in your house unattended. Crating, if they are not being supervised, is reccommended. Do not leave a Siberian alone in your car uncrated unless you know the dog well. They, like a lot of dogs, can eat a car seat in a few minutes.



Socializing this breed?

Socialization is one of the necessary requirements to successful dog ownership. This breed thrives in dog and human activities. They need company like they need food and water. Socialization and social activity for these dogs is mandatory to maintain a happy, well balanced and almost well behaved Siberian Husky.

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Brilliant, thorough, clear, informative, direct easily understood. Great work, Val. Thank you for all the research and editing it took to put this up.

Great information for anyone interested in being owned by a Sibe and a great review for those of us who already are . . . ("owned" that is . . . :) ).

 

Carmen OFM

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I just got my first dog this week and she is a Husky. She is seven weeks old today and I absolutely love playing with her. And I can not wait to take her to the park! She does wake up in the middle of the night to let her out and I am crate training right now. She is a lot of work but I wouldnt trade it for anything!! I love being a husky mommy :)

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Please wait until she's had all her shots before taking her to the park.

Talk to your vet if you're not sure. :)

 

I just got my first dog this week and she is a Husky. She is seven weeks old today and I absolutely love playing with her. And I can not wait to take her to the park! She does wake up in the middle of the night to let her out and I am crate training right now. She is a lot of work but I wouldnt trade it for anything!! I love being a husky mommy :)

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oh trust me i am waiting until she has her shots to take her really anywhere!! She goes the 31st to get her shots. Then im gonna wait another week before i take her to the park. I do not want her getting sick!!

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The shots come in 2 sets administered a month apart

(over here) and you have to wait a further week  before you can take them out.

 

So they are about 12 - 13 weeks before they can go

 

oh trust me i am waiting until she has her shots to take her really anywhere!! She goes the 31st to get her shots. Then im gonna wait another week before i take her to the park. I do not want her getting sick!!

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