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We went for a walk in the lakes today covering part of the west side of Windermere. It was only after we had let the dogs drink from the lake one of the group (not a dog owner) remembered he'd read a sign at the information office in the morning warning not to let your dog drink from the lake!!

Apparently the lake contains blue green algae which can make humans ill but kill dogs within hours. On returning home I've done a little digging and there are three reported deaths of dogs from either swimming or drinking from the lake.

Why aren't there signs on the lake edge warning people about this?!

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That's a terrible omission on the part of the park authorities.

It should be on the pay and display meters in the car parks too.

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That's a terrible omission on the part of the park authorities.

It should be on the pay and display meters in the car parks too.

I can't honestly say if there are or aren't warnings at the car park meters. We parked at Wray Castle as two of our party visited the castle. But if they can put way markers everywhere surely they can place signs along the lake edge

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It is true that 2 years ago there was blue green algie in lake Windermere (it caused the cancelation of the UK's biggest open water swim- the great north swim) and yes it is true that there were some dogs who had died from being in the lake at that time, it is also true that while the blue green algie was in the lake there were signs at the lake edge at all public lake access points - it is also true that at least one of the dog owners who lost a dog to blue green algie didn't heed the signs although they admitted they had seen them. The current signs that are displayed in the information centres are to inform people that there has been blue green algie and that they can't guarantee that there isn't any part of the lake that has it currently( the lake is 10miles long and approx 1 mile wide) , however since the original outbreak 2 years ago they lake waters are tested on a regular bases to keep lake users safe. I have lived in the lakes for nearly 6 years now and unless the signs are back up at the lakes edge I wouldn't hesitate to go into the lake. I have spent many a happy summer swimming and boating in the lake.

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It is true that 2 years ago there was blue green algie in lake Windermere (it caused the cancelation of the UK's biggest open water swim- the great north swim) and yes it is true that there were some dogs who had died from being in the lake at that time, it is also true that while the blue green algie was in the lake there were signs at the lake edge at all public lake access points - it is also true that at least one of the dog owners who lost a dog to blue green algie didn't heed the signs although they admitted they had seen them. The current signs that are displayed in the information centres are to inform people that there has been blue green algie and that they can't guarantee that there isn't any part of the lake that has it currently( the lake is 10miles long and approx 1 mile wide) , however since the original outbreak 2 years ago they lake waters are tested on a regular bases to keep lake users safe. I have lived in the lakes for nearly 6 years now and unless the signs are back up at the lakes edge I wouldn't hesitate to go into the lake. I have spent many a happy summer swimming and boating in the lake.

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The report I read was dated sept 2011 and had occured in the the last week of August. The water was tested immediately after the and found clear, but the dog still died

We go walking in the lakes quite often and regularly take our canoe onto Coniston

A point my OH just made, if the authorities think it necessary to have constant signs in the information centres there should be signs on the lake edge.

Edited by Povodny
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The report I read was dated sept 2011 and had occured in the the last week of August. The water was tested immediately after the and found clear, but the dog still died

We go walking in the lakes quite often and regularly take our canoe onto Coniston

Lucky you,it must be very beautiful there.Just hope all your doggies are ok,you have enough on your plate with poor Safi,so certainly don't need anything else to worry about.Fingers crossed.x

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Lucky you,it must be very beautiful there.Just hope all your doggies are ok,you have enough on your plate with poor Safi,so certainly don't need anything else to worry about.Fingers crossed.x

Thanks Karen, I'm certain they're fine :) but my concern is when we go to the lakes we avoid busy areas, we don't go into the towns or information centres so would never have seen the signs there, it was purely because a friend had stayed for the weekend and gone into the information centre we now know and are aware. Signs on the lake edge would have been better for people like us.

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Thanks Karen, I'm certain they're fine :) but my concern is when we go to the lakes we avoid busy areas, we don't go into the towns or information centres so would never have seen the signs there, it was purely because a friend had stayed for the weekend and gone into the information centre we now know and are aware. Signs on the lake edge would have been better for people like us.

You are absolutely right Nicola,and we would have done exactly the same.It's really not good enough,but at least you know now,and can be careful in future.:).Thankfully,my lot are a right bunch of pansies,and would do anything to not even get their feet wet(honest!!:rolleyes:),so no chance of them skinny dipping in a lake.....Still you never know, so better to be forewarned......Karen.x

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You are absolutely right Nicola,and we would have done exactly the same.It's really not good enough,but at least you know now,and can be careful in future.:).Thankfully,my lot are a right bunch of pansies,and would do anything to not even get their feet wet(honest!!:rolleyes:),so no chance of them skinny dipping in a lake.....Still you never know, so better to be forewarned......Karen.x

Agreed :)

Ha ha, mine will paddle but that's it.. And Loki is a complete wuss and afraid of heights. Getting him over footbridges is a nightmare. He commando crawls when on them but you have to get him excited an make a run at it to start him off.

As for jetty's... That's height and water!!!! Noooooooo

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Agreed :)

Ha ha, mine will paddle but that's it.. And Loki is a complete wuss and afraid of heights. Getting him over footbridges is a nightmare. He commando crawls when on them but you have to get him excited an make a run at

it to start him off.

As for jetty's... That's height and water!!!! Noooooooo

Lol,you will have to make a vid of that I think!!:rolleyes:(don't forget,I'm waiting for the NO brakes one too!!):D

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Just to give some more information about blue-green algae (taken from my biology notes) ...

Cyanobacteria (blue green algae) blooms are the result of the addition of phosphate into the lake ecosystem. The additional phosphates may come from fertilizers (from agricultural or otherwise). As more algae bloom, more of them die. The decaying organic matter consumes oxygen in the water, resulting in hypoxic water conditions. Without enough oxygen in the water, aquatic plants and animals die off in large numbers. This damages the aquatic ecosystem.

and then it goes on to say:

Harmful algal blooms produce toxins (cyanotoxins). These toxins can be neuro, cyto, hepa, and endotoxins. These can be dangerous or even fatal to both humans and animals.

[upon further investigation, Mascoma Lake in the UK is 'famous' for high levels of cyanotoxins.]

Some pictures showing what a lake/shoreline looks during a bloom. The more green there is in the water, the more intense the bloom.

post-3404-13586081412027_thumb.jpg

post-3404-13586081412281_thumb.jpg

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Just to give some more information about blue-green algae (taken from my biology notes) ...

Cyanobacteria (blue green algae) blooms are the result of the addition of phosphate into the lake ecosystem. The additional phosphates may come from fertilizers (from agricultural or otherwise). As more algae bloom, more of them die. The decaying organic matter consumes oxygen in the water, resulting in hypoxic water conditions. Without enough oxygen in the water, aquatic plants and animals die off in large numbers. This damages the aquatic ecosystem.

and then it goes on to say:

Harmful algal blooms produce toxins (cyanotoxins). These toxins can be neuro, cyto, hepa, and endotoxins. These can be dangerous or even fatal to both humans and animals.

[upon further investigation, Mascoma Lake in the UK is 'famous' for high levels of cyanotoxins.]

Some pictures showing what a lake/shoreline looks during a bloom. The more green there is in the water, the more intense the bloom.

So far as I'm aware, there's no such lake in the uk.. Could be wrong though. There's one in the US of the same name though could it be that one?

Just did a quick search. Mascoma is an aboriginal word meaning much grass, salmon fishing or red rocks.. Definitely not English then lol

Edited by Povodny
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So far as I'm aware, there's no such lake in the uk.. Could be wrong though. There's one in the US of the same name though could it be that one?

Just did a quick search. Mascoma is an aboriginal word meaning much grass, salmon fishing or red rocks.. Definitely not English then lol

Whoops, yeah. It's in the US. I must have misread it. :oops

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