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magical Merlin

Bite inhabition - the most important thing you can teach your dog

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excellent post .. only wish i could have given you more rep for it than allowed..... top marks one of the best posts IMO on the forum.

allthough i dont encourage mine to bite at me and they will get warned when they do .. i will encourage mouthing my hand etc.. apparently the mouthing process shows that they respect and trust you and do it to find out if there is mutual trust and respect.. ..same as i when playing i will play bite their necks .. just showing them whos is "pack leader" and it seems to work for me...

i beleive that i have with my girls the position through love trust and respect.. and thankfully not cos i have had to yell to get it.. only some times raise my voice slightly lol..

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Cant believe I havent read this before ..... But its good that people are still picking up on it, and still giving you the +1 for it as the post is extremely informative.

+1 from me

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Great post and advice-tusen takk(thousand thanks)!! I'm having this trouble with my Husky pup who is 12 wks old,man I forgot just how sharp their teeth are, and he uses full force. I will try this method, because we really would like to pet him-he always wants to play, and to him that equals biting!

Attila

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I hope you dont mind Merlin but I want to add something to your work. :)

Often if you are playing with a puppy he doesnt grab body parts because he wants to hurt

you. Watch your dog play with other dogs and you will see that being grabby with their

mouth is a common form of play between dogs.

If your puppy is older than 6 months and still has not learned bite inhibition and doesnt have

a healthy respect for your hands there are three ways to teach them.

Most professionals who have been around awhile teach a snippy dog who gets way to excited

to take things gently by using a spoon with a treat on it. They say this helps teach the dog the

power behind their jaws. I havent had to do this before, but I hear that it works well with dogs

if done properly.

If you have a big puppy like chewy or achilles who are 50 pounds at 5 months, you will want to

tackle bite inhibition quickly and ensure that they will back off quickly if they get grabby with you,

even by accident. Recently Achilles got grabby with a friend of mine, andthen later with me, even

though he does know better, and chewy used to be grabby when bringing a ball back during fetch.

I taught them both very quickly to respect my hands and back off by one excercise done only 2 or3

times on each dog.

When your dog grabs hold of your hands or grabs clothes or arms, they not only have to realize that

they shouldnt use the full force of their mouth, but that they should release their grip completely and

back off. When achilles recently grabbed my hand with his mouth all I did was gently take hold of the

bottom of his jaw. I placed all four fingers flat across his tongue, and applied subtle pressure with my

thumb to the bottom of his chin. You do not need to hurt your dog or hold on for more than a few

seconds. Dogs do not like to have fingers layed across their tongue, and the light pressure on the

bottom of the chin will make them automatically lift their head, turn their head and they will want to

back away because you have surpprised them by getting "grabby" right back. You do not want to grab

the top of the jaw, because pressure on the top inside of the mouth only makes them want to close their

mouth and that could be dangerous.

The third way is to start early teaching them that if they are not sitting or laying down and relaxed, you

wont offer them anything. They have to learn that they have to respect your hands because everything

you give them...you use your hands to give it to them.

I have tried this and its helped-was really having this occur with our pup who is an early Dec litter pup. He really clamps down and those puppy teeth absolutely destroy skin-ouch!!

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Good to revive this thread. I participated in it and asked a question almost one year ago ...

I am happy to report that, one year later, Dakota still mouths during play and is now VERY QUICK to stop when we say, "No mouth!" (We changed it, because I figured "No bite!" sounds bad when said in front of strangers!) He has pretty much learned to mouth only our arms and elbows during play if we let him, and we never, ever put our hands toward his face as if to try to tempt him to grab hands.

So far so good. He has never hurt us or broken skin -- it's really kind of neat how gentle he is with his mouth.

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So glad I found this thread. I have been having a tremendous amount of trouble with my little boy. Bo started his rough mouthing about 2 months ago. He will listen to my husband's every command, but not so much mine. He did stop the really bad biting for a short time, but has now started to bite my hands (sometimes hard, sometimes not) and that was one of the reason's that I was tempted to get rid of him. However, like I said the situation improved, but he has relapsed. I know he is a puppy and sometimes this happens. But sometimes, for no reason at all, he will jump up from wherever he is and run to me in my recliner and jump up and start biting my arms and hands. I am really perplexed. I have read all the above posts and I will try some of your advice. Glad to know I'm not alone on this. BTW, I took him to a trainer for his aggression problem. She picked him up off the floor by his collar and held him until he went limp and was gurgling for air. It was all I could do not to kick her in the face. Sorry, I know that sounds bad on my part, but I thought she almost killed him. She also said I didn't know how to show him who was boss. Needless to say, I never went back. There aren't many trainers here in my area, so it looks like I'm just going to have to train myself. Any ideas as to what may be causing this?

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good post bella has bite inhabition when you first start playing but when she starts getting really excited she either forgets or is just too excited and i dont know lol she just starts biting harder trying to get us so then we stop but just relaxed playing with her is fine its only when she is really revved up it can get bit painful =s

we got her at 6 weeks tho =s so dont think she learnt to much about it we are trying to teach her as much as possible =D

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Very awesome post :3

Not sure if this was mentioned, skimmed over the topic and didn't see it. When I got my boy he was terrible at nipping, I found that the ouch worked alright but didn't seem to be doing the trick all the time. I found that nipping his ear lightly and increasing pressure til he let out a little yelp did wonders. I'm not one to beat on a dog, I love positive reinforcement but I found this way the most effective. Recently adopted a female pup that's 5 months and she's terrible with nipping (could be due to teething at this point of time, was never socialized either and taken way too young). Since introducing the nipping of the ear in about a day her nipping has almost ceased to exist. Just the way that works for me.

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:bump4: For you to help with Mika, she isn't too young to learn-its actually better to help her get started now before she really starts biting like our little Demon did!

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Excellent post.

Our Husky left his parents at about 5 weeks which was probably a little early, however bite inhabitation was a breeze to teach. What remains more of a challenge though is jumping up on strangers in exitement. The "off" command works well with us, but with strangers not so easy. Of all the dogs I had in this lifetime, I find it very easy to train our first Husky though.

Our real challenge lies with a jungle dog we rescued at two weeks old from years of strays in American Samoa. Never had a dog with such a "human" personality before, but the agressive nature and alpha personality makes her bite directly proportional to how much she feels threatened. At three years old now, nothing works and one day this may lead to her end. If she is not forcefully pushed beyond her fear threshold, hopefully we will stay out of trouble.

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Here's a little bit of a different approach and one to do at the same time as the "ouch" method listed in the OP. First off, you don't want the dog to worry about you putting your fingers in it's mouth. It's very useful to have a dog who will be relaxed when you look at its teeth, need to shove a pill down its throat, or need to remove something from its mouth. And, as stated in the OP, you want the dog to know to bite gently when playing with other dogs. This is the method I used along with saying "ouch!" and stopping any game if the puppy put its mouth on me:

Start off with your puppy being calm. Put your finger in its mouth. If it applies pressure, say "ouch!" and when they release the pressure, praise and give a treat (with your other hand, so your fingers don't taste like treats!). If the puppy doesn't apply pressure from the get go, praise and give a treat. Do not remove your finger from its mouth when pressure is given (which is kind of hard to do when those shrap puppy teeth are clamped down on you!). Only do so when no pressure is given.

After a week of that, your puppy should know the concept a little better, so if they apply pressure now, just say "ouch!" and don't give a treat if they release, just give praise. Only treat if no pressure was given in the first place.

After a week of that, start the "game" with your puppy in a more playful, excited mood. But with the added excitement, you need to go back to step one and praise AND treat when they release pressure.

After a week of that, continue starting with the puppy excited, but go to step two and only give praise if pressure was given then released. But still give a treat if no pressure was given at all.

And throughout this whole process, I still did as was recommended in the OP that if the puppy puts its mouth on me (not me putting my fingers in its mouth) then I'd say "Ouch!" and there would be a short time out.

Do this "game" in any spare time you have like when watching tv and do it often. It also helps to be hand feeding the puppy around the same time and you can use its food as the treats for the game.

I spent a lot of time doing this with Siku, cause she was an extremely mouthy puppy (our mistake for getting her at 6 weeks). But it really paid off. Now she knows what gentle means and you can even tell when she's playing with other dogs that she hardly puts any pressure on them at all. Also I did notice her mouthyness went away slowly as she neared a year old.

You can tell pretty easily that I didn't spend as much time playing the "game" with Elara. She wasn't nearly as mouthy (got her at 8 weeks), so it didn't concern me as much. But now she still mouths a little too hard at times, so I will need to keep doing it with her.

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Has anyone got any tips on transferring this to things your wearing? I've been trying a lot of techniques mentioned and she generally is biting less hard, and will actually be very delicate when its just my finger in her mouth. But with stuff I'm wearing she will just run and clamp down pretty hard sometimes!, specially on sleeves and shoes and then she will usually accidentally catch somewhere else as hard (or see a sock as being a shoe, I found that the hard way!). I've tried "Ouching" even at just any contact but unlike when its my skin she seems to know I'm "having her on" and ignores it!

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Haha thanks, she's got a lot better now anyway! Now its normally only when she's really excited (For a walk / Me coming home) and in which case I've just been firmly saying no and standing and waiting till she stops, or if she really doesn't quit I just pick her up lol. She doesn't like being carried against her will so as soon as I do she usually just quits it instantly and is like pfffft touché lets call it quits lol

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Hi all this post really helped me with Alfies mouthing he knows how hard to play with me and my hubby and even the older kids but my 6 year old plays with him and he seems to be a bit rougher with her than anyone else and she is the one who trains him 80% of the time, she is very talented in that department, is there anything different that she can do as we have tried her yelping, stopping play, even a firm no, but nothing seems to lighten his bite on her. Alfie is nearly 5 months now and im afraid if we dont sort it now he his going to hurt her.

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:bump4: for another new member~you're advice sure comes in handy, Magical Merlin, have used it for ourselves as well as bumping this up and copying/pasting in posts for new members with trouble in this area as well as new members looking for advice on Husky's as a whole:goodjob: and :thankyou::up:

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So glad you bumped this! Duke is very nippy, especially when he is excited and nothing seems to help. I'll try out these methods and look into the spoon one as well. I don't think he realizes how hard he bites sometimes!

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