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Pulling and reactivity best lead.


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Hi,

What works for one may not work for another.¬† I have a rescue he's a puller and strong.¬† He's reactive in lunging at other dogs if they are off leash and run over¬†ūü§®. However i have difficulty with his reactivity if he sees another dog. He had a real bad time before i adooted him. I've had him a while and it's been¬† slow process but it would be nice to go on a walk minus the reactivity.¬† I'm thinking of trying a slip lead this is due to his size and he's strong. Any advice on a brand of slip lead that's good quality. I want to stop the pulling and lunging as he's big. I do have a muzzle . He's good on commands accept when he's sees another dog or person that's due to his past life before I got him. All training goes out the window when he's sees another dog and you cannot avoid people or other dogs forever no matter where you walk.

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I have two rescues,  both pullers  - one reactive - one not.       The latest one WILL try to kill anything the size of a cat or smaller  - so we are taking less walks at the estuary  - too many dogs off lead.      I cannot use a slip lead as the reactive one can get out of them  -  he has a habit of turning to face you and backing out whilst ducking his head  - he must have had one of these in the past.    I cannot use one for the other dog either  - he is a woolly and a slip lead would destroy his neck fur and block with fur so not get tight enough  - and if he gets loose I wont see him again  (airhead).   We even tried the canny collars but BOTH dogs can get out of them - even when the collars are too tight.

I have had to stick to a front-lead harness for both dogs (i.e. the lead attaches at the chest),  which tends to turn them round if they lunge - but over the years they have gotten used to this and both are still champion pullers.      Strangely enough if the smaller of the two is just out with me he only takes around 5 minutes to settle down and not pull too severely  - but if the other dog is with us - all bets are off.       The other dog will walk nicely with me on his own but if he sees another dog  - particularly a smaller dog, I get pulled over.   Both dogs together are a nightmare.

Its not my dogs' fault though  -  they CAN do it  (separately and with me) but hubby takes them out more than I do and he just puts up with it  - i.e. they get no consistency.

If you do find something I have not tried please let us know.    I used to control a Borzoi with just a head collar  (halti type) and at the time he weighed around the same as  I did  -  not found one that can stay on Marley more than 4 seconds.

 

 

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You have just put me off a slip lead as when I googled it can come off. It's the reactivity I'm trying to stop. It's holding him back. He's had a bad time before I got him which I'm not going to go into online but it's fear based. I've had to turn around and come home on some walks. I've googled and tried various distractions but if another dog comes to close he lunges and he's big and strong.  I've sprained my wrist and pulled my shoulders many a time. If there's no other dogs he's brilliant on the lead.

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same here but then I have a 13 year (32 kgs) old boss of all she sees a 12 year old (30 kgs) that wants to run away from any confrontation and a 3 year old welsh springer, 21 kgs, (partly blind) that needs to tell the world that he is there as well..... so my walking belt is the only thing that keeps me on my feet...LOLOL

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Where are you based ? I know of a uk reactive Dogs Facebook group , my girl is fear reactive and my boy protective and I can walk both fine on harness , it's about catching your dogs interest before the other dog does and showing them that they don't need to react , I can now walk past other dogs (tho I still keep a safe distance anyway) with no issues,  I use double ended dog leads (police lead) on mine and my walking belt 

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Hi ,

I'm in the UK and looking for a certified dog trainer / behaviourist.  I have found one thankfully. I've tried the distraction methods. The issue is my dog had an awful life pre adoption.  It's fear based. Qualified dog trainers are few and far between so I've found one. 

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6 hours ago, Onceuponadime said:

Hi ,

I'm in the UK and looking for a certified dog trainer / behaviourist.  I have found one thankfully. I've tried the distraction methods. The issue is my dog had an awful life pre adoption.  It's fear based. Qualified dog trainers are few and far between so I've found one. 

If you find you need the group link let me know , they have behaviourists on there who can help too , my girl is fear reactive from being attacked and its helped loads , she can stand really close to another dog and be relaxed,  she stood and chilled next to me whilst my boy said hello to another dog earlier today 

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17 minutes ago, BingBlaze n Skyla said:

If you find you need the group link let me know , they have behaviourists on there who can help too , my girl is fear reactive from being attacked and its helped loads , she can stand really close to another dog and be relaxed,  she stood and chilled next to me whilst my boy said hello to another dog earlier today 

As long as the behaviourist is qualified there are far too many unqualified ones out there. I've found that put along the way. 

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I can tell you what worked for me. It took a couple months of constant work, but eventually my girl stopped pulling and walked calmly beside me. I used a head harness with 2-4 foot waist leash. We went on walks every single day to get her used to the head harness, sometime 3 to 4x a day. If your dog is food motivated, every time the dog relaxes and ignores to harness, award the behavior. Continue until your dog stops pulling on the harness all together and ignores it. Now shift your full focus to keeping your dog at your side (whether left or right, which ever is comfortable for you), you do not want him/her to get in front you. As your remains at your side, award that good behavior. You want your dog to understand that you are in control. 

I hope this helps 

https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwi2lYjegtf4AhXmbm8EHUgcDUQYABALGgJqZg&ae=2&sig=AOD64_2gXvtg9H2YEPzPRaGoy1c_k1BZ5A&ctype=5&q=&ved=2ahUKEwjsjf_dgtf4AhU2omoFHdZiAv8Q9aACKAB6BAgBED8&adurl=

 

As for the social awkwardness towards other dogs, take him/her to dog park. First start out on the outside, award good behavior when it is presented. If they get aggressive remove the dog from that environment (walk away). As they show better behavior, take the next step inside the park, with minimum dogs inside. (If needed us muzzle during training) Do the same as before but inside. Make sure to keep your dog leashes until your are fully sure your dog is behaving. the last step is to let your dog off-leash and repeat the process. Eventually you will be a stress free parent with a happy playful pup. 

Remember none of this is going to happen over night, All dogs especially huskies need consistent training.

Even tho my girl is trained and very well behaved now, we are always training, to help her remember her keys. Makes for a very happy husky.

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6 hours ago, Onceuponadime said:

Hi 

It's the reactivity that's the issue. Pulling and lunging if another dog comes into sight. Like I have said I have tried various methods. The issue is his previous experiences prior to me getting him. 

If you are near Lancashire/Blackpool area I can put you in touch with an excellent one  - does the full - No Force Training, / no head collar  training - he deals with the worst dogs of both our biggest rescue and the Doberman Rescue.

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A trainer is basically going to start the communication between owner and dog all over from the beginning.  He may respect you on walk alone and behave properly.  But he completely forgets it as soon as he sees another animal.  Communication is key. See a behavioral dog expert. 

This isn't so much training but more so a moody teenager in your hands.. Good luck

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