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Stusmalls1990

New Biting & Agression

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Hey all!¬†ūüėä

 

I will try keep this brief but informative.. 

Me & my partner recently purchased mishka a 1-6month old husky girl. Having came from a home with children we thought this was perfect as we have both always wanted one, having collected her she was the perfect husky.. Loads of kisses.. Jumping up as you'd expect now and again and lovely and welcoming in the mornings too.. 3 weeks later and we have a different dog.. She gets more exercise now than she has ever had.. We have a large garden too and she gets plenty of walks.. Recently I noticed some ear scratching & biting of her coat.. So I took her to the vets and they confirmed x2 ear infections.. Her ears have been cleaned and ear drops applied for 7 days now.. Ever since her ear infections and application of the drops she has completely changed. Biting hands when approaching to stroke her, nibbling of arms/face.. Very snappy and even barking.. We are at our whits end.. What can we do 

 

 

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This is her now.. As you can see the fur has changed from scratching around the ears.. She just looks completely different.. Unhappy & aggressive 

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Has she been tested for allergies ? If shes biting her coat her skin could be sore which could be why shes telling you off when you try to stroke her 

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28 minutes ago, BingBlaze n Skyla said:

Has she been tested for allergies ? If shes biting her coat her skin could be sore which could be why shes telling you off when you try to stroke her 

Not tested for allergies no but she has been to the vets recently.. This wouldn't explain her nibbling us though or attempting to do the same to our faces 

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Do you have a good dog behavourist you can contact?     You do not state where  (which country) you are from.     When she tries nibbling  (or biting)  I would yelp loudly - like another pup would if hurt   -  and stop any interaction.   This is what siblings would do.     She may have lost trust in you if the treatment made her uncomfortable   -  and associate your hands with that pain/ discomfort.    In any case the 'nibbling'  needs to be discouraged  -  it can lead to escalation.    One possible cause could be that she was taken from mum too early  and had not learned bite inhibition from her siblings and mum.

My latest rescue came with issues  (dont they all in their own way)  -   and its taken almost 8 months to get him to come to us for fuss/attention,   he was  (and still is to a certain extent)  extremely  'head shy'  so we avoided that area -  I went to stroke his back and rear end instead  -  and as soon as I touched his rear end  he bit me  - didn't break the skin  -  but it was hard enough.    He was - and still is,  fearful of strange females  - he has gotten used to me now  - but still moves VERY quickly if I appear to be in the slightest bit vexed with them.   Initially, to us,  he was somewhat fearful and  timid, but with an underlying readiness to retalliate to any perseeved ill treatment  - but to our existing (slightly older) dog he was overly domineering, a real bully  - this has lessened but playtime is still monitored.

I got my other dog at 12 weeks old  (4th owner at that young age) he was (and still is) a bundle of love, fun, affection,  the only person he has ever tried to bite is our vet -  but about a year after I got him I discovered he is absolutely terrified of the bamboo canes used for plants  - as soon as I had one in my hand he ran from me around the garden, tail tucked down, head down, not taking his eyes off me.        He is not afraid of walking sticks,  or anything that looks like one  -  but the bamboo canes  terrify him.

The reason I am going through this is to point out that for whatever reason your dog had a life before you  - and you don't know what has happened to her in the past  -  why was she rehomed?     

If you can positively rule out any sort of physical reason for the change in behaviour  -  then you must look to psychological.

 

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9 hours ago, wolfpup said:

Do you have a good dog behavourist you can contact?     You do not state where  (which country) you are from.     When she tries nibbling  (or biting)  I would yelp loudly - like another pup would if hurt   -  and stop any interaction.   This is what siblings would do.     She may have lost trust in you if the treatment made her uncomfortable   -  and associate your hands with that pain/ discomfort.    In any case the 'nibbling'  needs to be discouraged  -  it can lead to escalation.    One possible cause could be that she was taken from mum too early  and had not learned bite inhibition from her siblings and mum.

My latest rescue came with issues  (dont they all in their own way)  -   and its taken almost 8 months to get him to come to us for fuss/attention,   he was  (and still is to a certain extent)  extremely  'head shy'  so we avoided that area -  I went to stroke his back and rear end instead  -  and as soon as I touched his rear end  he bit me  - didn't break the skin  -  but it was hard enough.    He was - and still is,  fearful of strange females  - he has gotten used to me now  - but still moves VERY quickly if I appear to be in the slightest bit vexed with them.   Initially, to us,  he was somewhat fearful and  timid, but with an underlying readiness to retalliate to any perseeved ill treatment  - but to our existing (slightly older) dog he was overly domineering, a real bully  - this has lessened but playtime is still monitored.

I got my other dog at 12 weeks old  (4th owner at that young age) he was (and still is) a bundle of love, fun, affection,  the only person he has ever tried to bite is our vet -  but about a year after I got him I discovered he is absolutely terrified of the bamboo canes used for plants  - as soon as I had one in my hand he ran from me around the garden, tail tucked down, head down, not taking his eyes off me.        He is not afraid of walking sticks,  or anything that looks like one  -  but the bamboo canes  terrify him.

The reason I am going through this is to point out that for whatever reason your dog had a life before you  - and you don't know what has happened to her in the past  -  why was she rehomed?     

If you can positively rule out any sort of physical reason for the change in behaviour  -  then you must look to psychological.

 

She was on a chain locked up in the back garden/ in the home.. No life for a dog! Today she has been slightly better and we are trying the yelping although it is being slightly ignored.. Her coat around her ears doesnt as you can see luck as healthy.. How often are yours bathed? And has anyone tried the raw food options? 

 

We are going to invest in a behaviourist I think.. And we are from the UK

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The biting could displacement behavior to help ease anxiety/stress  , usually  a lick or a yawn but your dog might find nibbling helps 

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25 minutes ago, BingBlaze n Skyla said:

The biting could displacement behavior to help ease anxiety/stress  , usually  a lick or a yawn but your dog might find nibbling helps 

So how can we kerb this? She is yawning a lot and licking her lips 

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I will leave your question re biting to BB&S.   As for raw feeding  -  there are quite a few of us here who feed raw  so if you have any particular questions someone will be able to help.

I tend to bath my boys once a year   - unless they get into something they shouldn't and need it.     Last time was just last week.    I wait for a sunny warm day with a slight breeze  - it helps the wooly one dry quicker  -  he wont have a dryer anywhere near him.

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Hi, She’s still young and biting, nibbling etc is part of dog behaviour, positive reinforced training is essential to correct unwanted behaviour and be consistent, making sure the family are on the same page.
I‚Äôd start by giving her a firm no when she starts to bite, turn your back on her and don‚Äôt engage at all, when she stops say ‚Äėgood girl‚Äô and make a fuss, she‚Äôll learn quickly, husky‚Äôs love human interaction so ignoring her is something she won‚Äôt enjoy and if she persists give her a time out for a few minutes. I‚Äôd advise to research the breed, you won‚Äôt have a well behaved Labrador, you will have a husky who will challenge and frustrate you but you will have the best companion. Work on building up your bond with her that‚Äôs where trust develops between you and once it‚Äôs established training becomes easier. Good luck!


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Also..... some dogs don’t like hands coming towards them to stroke them on their head, one of mine was the same, so I waited until he was settled and I’d sit next to him stroking his head and ears and his snout telling him he was a good boy and gorgeous, it took months and now there’s no issue. They need to associate the training with something good.


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If it is stress something like adaptil could help , or something for anxiety from your vets , a lot of patience too if shes not used to being indoors and around people it's going to take time for her to get used to such a big change

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