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novakm

Puppy Teeth and Behavior issues

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Hello everyone,

 

This is going to be long and have many questions as I am new to the forum and new to owning a Husky.

 

My little girl is 13 weeks old today and the past few weeks she has been more and more “playful.” However, by this I mean she has been more interested in nipping at my hands, arms, and feet rather than her toys. Occasionally, she will even bite down harder if attempting to move away. I signed her up for a puppy schooling and she starts this weekend, but the school is basically just me learning how to train her with the presence of other pups and the instructor. I feel like she wont listen very well for multiple reasons. The few dogs she has encountered early in her life were such that did not seem interested in playing with her so they would growl and bark when she tried to play. Now she seems to bark and want to be dominant over any other dog that lets her close but if they bark she freaks out and then begins to just bark back. So, since this class is with other puppies I am afraid she will just be a loudmouth and bark at the others.

 

Another reason why is because when I train her at home with treats, she does not want to listen because all she wants to do is eat the treat. She will only sit as it seems that is all she really learned from me. She also goes crazy when I am about to feed her as if I starve her but she has always had plenty of food each day based on what I have researched online. I have read that Huskies would stop eating when full but I feel that she definitely would eat until everything is gone so I do not want to accidentally overfeed her. Anyway, with the treat issue, I have attempted to even hide the treats without her knowing to attempt to train her other commands, but she always knows when there is a treat out I assume because of the smell. I do not know if this class will help me or her learn due to these issues and I have also had much trouble teaching her not to bite at my arms and hands.

 

I know this post is all over the place, but one last thing. She has had an overbite ever since I got her and before our first pet visit, I noticed her lower canine is poking a hole into the top of her mouth. It has been this way ever since I got her that I know of which was about 2 months ago. The vet said to wait it out and see if it would fix itself or cause any other issues which I feel like now it has been a pain to her and she is extra aggressive while this teething process takes place. The hole does not seem infected, but it still seems like it is painful. After she receives her last set of shots in a couple weeks I will likely change her vet so I am not sure of whether to get a second opinion beforehand. Either way, I would love any help, feedback, or information regarding any of my concerns as well as any tips on how to prevent her hole becoming infected in the mean time.

 

Sorry for such a lengthy post and I appreciate any help/advice I can get!

 

Thanks in advance!!

Oh, another thing with the acting like she is starving; she tends to scarf her food down like a vacuum cleaner almost every time. Any time I try to move her so she will slow down she will freak out and hurry to her bowl. I read on the forum to try feeding her from my hand so she doesn’t think I am taking her food, but I was wondering if this was normal for pups to do. My vet warned me about her stomach potentially flipping, but to not worry about it as she is just a puppy and could get better. I ordered a pattern bowl and am supposed to have it tomorrow so I hope it helps slow her down, but I always feel worried about her stomach flipping and bloating due to the high air she would be inhaling while gulping her food. Any other advice?


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Well, I am no expert!  But here is my attempt 🙂

On bitey-bitey (aka "landshark" phase):
Rather than just tolerate being bitten, most owners train their pups out of it. Techniques include the "Yelp" loudly and turn your back (refuse to play), and redirection (giving her a Toy to bite/chew on instead, or starting a game of Tug). The aim is to break the habit of teeth on human skin! They outgrow it and usually stop when done teething, but yes, people have gone through tubes of bandages and antibiotic depending on the size and biteyness of their pup...

On training & treats:
It's great that your dog is food-motivated, that means she will be easier to train! 
"Positive" training uses food as a Lure to get your dog to perform certain tasks on cue.
Eventually when the cue + behavior becomes a habit, the treat can be "faded out" (for example, rewarding once every few times, or randomly). 
( In my personal opinion and experience, positive training and teaching your dog to do what you want using treats, is 100% better than forceful things like grabbing collar, physically forcing dog.)

On eating fast & bloat:
If bolting her food, you can change her to a slow-feeder? Or always feed using a Kong, where she has to lick it out/roll it with her paws. 
I think it's normal for dogs to eat pretty fast (eating in a pack, if you pause to eat mindfully and savor your food, somebody else is gonna get it!  🙂
For avoiding "bloat" (possibly fatal condition when stomach turns over), avoid vigorous exercise before and after meals, and divide feedings into twice per day (not one big meal a day). I've heard waiting periods ranging from 2 hrs to 30 minutes...my personal guideline is 30 minutes for a leashed walk, but if you're going to be going to a dog park or running fullspeed/playing fetch/tongue-hanging exercise, then I'd wait 1-2 hours after eating...

It also sounds like your dog may be developing some "reactivity" with other dogs based on her earlier negative experiences?
If you go to puppy class, it is something to ask your teacher about. There are techniques to train dogs out of this.
If it's a good class, your pup may surprise you!
 In week 5 or 6 of our obedience class, my dog was sitting calmly a few feet away from another dog, heeling around cones, etc all while a few feet away from other dogs. I was pretty amazed, because he used to go nuts when passing other dogs on walks.

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Well, I am no expert!  But here is my attempt 

On bitey-bitey (aka "landshark" phase):
Rather than just tolerate being bitten, most owners train their pups out of it. Techniques include the "Yelp" loudly and turn your back (refuse to play), and redirection (giving her a Toy to bite/chew on instead, or starting a game of Tug). The aim is to break the habit of teeth on human skin! They outgrow it and usually stop when done teething, but yes, people have gone through tubes of bandages and antibiotic depending on the size and biteyness of their pup...

On training & treats:
It's great that your dog is food-motivated, that means she will be easier to train! 
"Positive" training uses food as a Lure to get your dog to perform certain tasks on cue.
Eventually when the cue + behavior becomes a habit, the treat can be "faded out" (for example, rewarding once every few times, or randomly). 
( In my personal opinion and experience, positive training and teaching your dog to do what you want using treats, is 100% better than forceful things like grabbing collar, physically forcing dog.)

On eating fast & bloat:
If bolting her food, you can change her to a slow-feeder? Or always feed using a Kong, where she has to lick it out/roll it with her paws. 
I think it's normal for dogs to eat pretty fast (eating in a pack, if you pause to eat mindfully and savor your food, somebody else is gonna get it! 
For avoiding "bloat" (possibly fatal condition when stomach turns over), avoid vigorous exercise before and after meals, and divide feedings into twice per day (not one big meal a day). I've heard waiting periods ranging from 2 hrs to 30 minutes...my personal guideline is 30 minutes for a leashed walk, but if you're going to be going to a dog park or running fullspeed/playing fetch/tongue-hanging exercise, then I'd wait 1-2 hours after eating...

It also sounds like your dog may be developing some "reactivity" with other dogs based on her earlier negative experiences?
If you go to puppy class, it is something to ask your teacher about. There are techniques to train dogs out of this.
If it's a good class, your pup may surprise you!
 In week 5 or 6 of our obedience class, my dog was sitting calmly a few feet away from another dog, heeling around cones, etc all while a few feet away from other dogs. I was pretty amazed, because he used to go nuts when passing other dogs on walks.


Well, I am glad to hear this landshark phase is not just something I am going through and has a name. I have read on the forum that this sort of thing tends to occur if you get the puppy prior to 8 weeks so the mother cannot teach some on her own. This is something possible in my case as I got Nova at about 6 weeks. I have many scratches from her sharp teeth/nails on my arms so I understand the antibiotics and bandages. If the class cannot help train this it will be a long wait and hopefully her teeth fall out and come back quickly!

With the training, I try to use her treats for positive reinforcement, but it is like she does not really care to do anything until she gets the treat so she jumps up and around crazily without really listening or paying attention to me or my voice. Hopefully the class instructor will teach me something I am unaware of to help with this.

I got a slow feeder and a kong today so I will try both of those out and hopefully stop the vacuum cleaner she is. Also, I am very cautious when it comes to the gastric torsion so I wait about 2-3 hours after each feed before doing anything and I also do not feed her until about 30 minutes- 1 hour after an exercise.

As for the behavior with other dogs, it is not really aggressive beyond a couple barks, but she does not really know how to play with anyone because of her past experiences. She loves seeing other animals and new people and will even sit and stare at them if I take her on a walk and she spots them from afar basically telling me she wants to go see them. Up close to another person, she licks them a lot then jumps up to lick and get pet, but with a dog she will be hesitant to do anything. I am a little nervous about the class, but I hope she does well and gets great socialization skills from it as well as get trained.

Thank you so much for the information and advice, I really do appreciate it!

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6 hours ago, novakm said:

With the training, I try to use her treats for positive reinforcement, but it is like she does not really care to do anything until she gets the treat so she jumps up and around crazily without really listening or paying attention to me or my voice. Hopefully the class instructor will teach me something I am unaware of to help with this. 

 

Yes, hopefully class will help. A large part of it is in timing....
You reward (treat) the behavior you like and want to see, within a second or two after the dog does the behavior.
This makes things clear to the dog.
Timing is everything in dog training!!

An easy thing to begin training even before your class is to have your pup on a long line...call her name...when she makes her way over to you, give her a treat and act really happy and proud.
Then you might have a chance to get her to "Come" when she's a grownup husky.... 😁

I also think class will be good because she has a chance to be around other dogs who are leashed, under control, and not going to mess with her...
In our class (basic obedience), the dogs were not allowed to meet each other. I think in puppy class, they sometimes have free play! 





 

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An easy thing to begin training even before your class is to have your pup on a long line...call her name...when she makes her way over to you, give her a treat and act really happy and proud.
Then you might have a chance to get her to "Come" when she's a grownup husky.... 


I will definitely be giving this a try before class. I had tried name training when I first got her and read online that it was a good idea to wait until 12 weeks for puppy’s vision and hearing to be fully developed, but I am not sure how true that is. Regardless, I would like to have her name trained soon. Thanks for the tip!

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