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Dr.Crazy

Raw Food Survey ???

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hi

What is your opinion about this diet?

best-dog-food-for-pitbull-puppies-new-best-25-raw-dog-food-ideas-on-pinterest-of-best-dog-food-for-pitbull-puppies.thumb.jpg.9220a875b64c3abe27130c02ebecaf1f.jpg

Thanks all for helping❤️

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I do not feed raw so cannot help you on that one...

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To me this is made up purely to sell their supplement.     It cannot really be called raw  with serving cooked eggs, & rice.   The main writing is too small to make out  - can you please supply the original link?   One thing I would say about the raw vegetables is that they say 'chopped'  -   which could mean 1" chunks -  any raw veg needs to be minced or mashed/blended.   Dogs are notorious for not chewing their food  -  and they have few digestive enzymes to cope with vegetables.   Wild dogs usually go for the intestines in their prey as the vegetation inside the intestines is already partly digested for them.    I do feed raw veg to my boys  -  mainly brussel sprouts, carrots, celery etc  -  peas are a no for me as they are too starchy - which causes inflammation.

I've just checked out the ingredients  -  and I am not that impressed I am afraid.  After whey protein isolate and pea protein  the next largest ingredient is corn syrup solids. Corn syrup has no place in a dog's diet - then comes vegetable oil as the next highest ingredient  -  this, like the fish oil is easily turned rancid once the pack is opened.

https://www.snowdog.guru/correcting-zinc-deficiency-in-huskies/     the two paragraphs below are copied from this link  -  

  • Mediocre dog food manufacturers add zinc to dog food but they add a cheap source of Zinc Oxide or Sulphate to their food. These forms are not easily absorbed or used by the body so it can be easy to assume that your dog is getting enough Zinc in his diet because of what it says on the dog food label.
  • Zinc forms ranked from best to worst:

  • Zinc citrate, picolinate and gluconate are very easily absorbable and well utilized by your dog’s body. ( 25mgs up to 100mgs daily)
  • Chelated Zinc does not bind to iron so it tends to upset the stomach less than some other forms of Zinc but maybe slightly less absorbable than picolinate and gluconate forms.( dosage is the same as above)
  • Zinc Methionine combines Zinc with Methionine and is reasonably well utilized in most dogs. ( 40 mgs daily dosage)
  • Zinc Sulphate tends to be very hard on the stomach causing unnecessary stomach upset. For that reason it is recommended that it be crushed and added in with food but this also makes it less absorbable. ( 200mgs daily dosage)
  • Zinc Oxide is a very cheap and highly un-absorbable form of Zinc. Sadly this is the form of Zinc being used by most mid to low end dog food manufacturers. No wonder so many Snow Dogs suffer from Zinc Deficiency.

I notice that both the zinc and manganese are both sulphates  which are difficult to absorb and can cause upsets and inflammation.  At least they mentioned baked potato  -  but the sweet potato is better for a dog than the white potato.   White potatoes are too high in starch.

Do you have a badly malnourished dog?   A rescue maybe?    Personally I would just feed a well balanced raw diet  - blend any raw veg so the bits are as small as possible, raw eggs, spirulina (1/16th teaspoon daily).

I suspect that if this supplement is fed to a 'normal' dog it would soon lead to it becoming fat.

 

 

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Eggs, white rice and potatoes are cooked on that list, so that's hardly a raw food diet! I also wouldn't feed my dog white rice and potatoes...

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We raw-feed but don't use "fillers" like rice or potato which contribute zero benefit - nor do we give any significant amounts of raw fruit or veg for the same reason. We do keep a vague eye on "balancing" their food over a period of time (over weeks never mind days or each meal) but go for variety of lamb, chicken, salmon, and, their favourite, tripe (either from our raw food supplier, market or reductions in the supermarket). Personally, if you're after increasing weight, I'd recommend lamb and lamb tripe - both excellent.

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Personally, I'd save your money.  If you're feeding a good quality food and they're healthy, then a supplement shouldn't really be needed as they'll get what they need from their food.  

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First, thank you all

 

On 5/1/2018 at 6:17 PM, robke said:

I do not feed raw so cannot help you on that one...

thanks for your attention❤️

 

On 5/1/2018 at 9:45 PM, wolfpup said:

To me this is made up purely to sell their supplement.     It cannot really be called raw  with serving cooked eggs, & rice.   The main writing is too small to make out  - can you please supply the original link?   One thing I would say about the raw vegetables is that they say 'chopped'  -   which could mean 1" chunks -  any raw veg needs to be minced or mashed/blended.   Dogs are notorious for not chewing their food  -  and they have few digestive enzymes to cope with vegetables.   Wild dogs usually go for the intestines in their prey as the vegetation inside the intestines is already partly digested for them.    I do feed raw veg to my boys  -  mainly brussel sprouts, carrots, celery etc  -  peas are a no for me as they are too starchy - which causes inflammation.

I've just checked out the ingredients  -  and I am not that impressed I am afraid.  After whey protein isolate and pea protein  the next largest ingredient is corn syrup solids. Corn syrup has no place in a dog's diet - then comes vegetable oil as the next highest ingredient  -  this, like the fish oil is easily turned rancid once the pack is opened.

https://www.snowdog.guru/correcting-zinc-deficiency-in-huskies/     the two paragraphs below are copied from this link  -  

  • Mediocre dog food manufacturers add zinc to dog food but they add a cheap source of Zinc Oxide or Sulphate to their food. These forms are not easily absorbed or used by the body so it can be easy to assume that your dog is getting enough Zinc in his diet because of what it says on the dog food label.
  • Zinc forms ranked from best to worst:

  • Zinc citrate, picolinate and gluconate are very easily absorbable and well utilized by your dog’s body. ( 25mgs up to 100mgs daily)
  • Chelated Zinc does not bind to iron so it tends to upset the stomach less than some other forms of Zinc but maybe slightly less absorbable than picolinate and gluconate forms.( dosage is the same as above)
  • Zinc Methionine combines Zinc with Methionine and is reasonably well utilized in most dogs. ( 40 mgs daily dosage)
  • Zinc Sulphate tends to be very hard on the stomach causing unnecessary stomach upset. For that reason it is recommended that it be crushed and added in with food but this also makes it less absorbable. ( 200mgs daily dosage)
  • Zinc Oxide is a very cheap and highly un-absorbable form of Zinc. Sadly this is the form of Zinc being used by most mid to low end dog food manufacturers. No wonder so many Snow Dogs suffer from Zinc Deficiency.

I notice that both the zinc and manganese are both sulphates  which are difficult to absorb and can cause upsets and inflammation.  At least they mentioned baked potato  -  but the sweet potato is better for a dog than the white potato.   White potatoes are too high in starch.

Do you have a badly malnourished dog?   A rescue maybe?    Personally I would just feed a well balanced raw diet  - blend any raw veg so the bits are as small as possible, raw eggs, spirulina (1/16th teaspoon daily).

I suspect that if this supplement is fed to a 'normal' dog it would soon lead to it becoming fat.

This was the best and most complete answer
Thank you very much💕

On 5/2/2018 at 6:40 AM, Vickie said:

Eggs, white rice and potatoes are cooked on that list, so that's hardly a raw food diet! I also wouldn't feed my dog white rice and potatoes... 

I also thought about this
White rice and cooked eggs are not a raw diet

On 5/2/2018 at 11:32 AM, Markulous said:

We raw-feed but don't use "fillers" like rice or potato which contribute zero benefit - nor do we give any significant amounts of raw fruit or veg for the same reason. We do keep a vague eye on "balancing" their food over a period of time (over weeks never mind days or each meal) but go for variety of lamb, chicken, salmon, and, their favourite, tripe (either from our raw food supplier, market or reductions in the supermarket). Personally, if you're after increasing weight, I'd recommend lamb and lamb tripe - both excellent. 

For me, dog health is all the more important
From then on I use chicken, fish and lamb🌹

On 5/2/2018 at 11:54 AM, wolfpup said:

I don't feed a lot of veg  -  around 10%  maybe a couple of times a week  -    I started giving a little more after reading this article 

https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/10-reasons-to-feed-vegetables-for-dogs/

 

TNX a lot 💕

On 5/2/2018 at 2:23 PM, Emma said:

Personally, I'd save your money.  If you're feeding a good quality food and they're healthy, then a supplement shouldn't really be needed as they'll get what they need from their food.  

Thanks for your comment🌹

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If you're after a decent food that's close to raw I feed a mix of Ziwipeak which is 98% protein/meat and taste of the wild which is also a high quality food. The reason I mix them 50/50 because TOTW costs $100 for 15kgs and Ziwipeak costs $170 for 4kgs. If I could afford to feed just Ziwipeak I would and if I had time and money I'd obviously feed 100% raw. I do feed raw bones and natural treats like freeze dried mussels, beef liver and cow ears but am very picky with what treats I give as some manufacturers use products in the drying process

 

Sent from my [device_name] using http://Husky Owners mobile app

 

 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, petertmartin said:

If you're after a decent food that's close to raw I feed a mix of Ziwipeak which is 98% protein/meat and taste of the wild which is also a high quality food. The reason I mix them 50/50 because TOTW costs $100 for 15kgs and Ziwipeak costs $170 for 4kgs. If I could afford to feed just Ziwipeak I would and if I had time and money I'd obviously feed 100% raw. I do feed raw bones and natural treats like freeze dried mussels, beef liver and cow ears but am very picky with what treats I give as some manufacturers use products in the drying process

 

Sent from my [device_name] using http://Husky Owners mobile app

 

 

 

 

Have you thought of investing in a dehydrator?   I make my own treats for my boys  -  using chicken breast, lambs liver and lambs hearts.   Occasionally I get a lamb 'pluck' (lungs, pancreas, spleen etc) for next to nothing from the butcher and dehydrate these as well.   The one I have cost me £36  -  and I made the money back in a couple of months with the savings on the expensive treats.   The other advantage is that you know exactly what is in the treat you are giving.

I reckon it costs me £60 a month to feed two dogs  i.e.  £1 a day each.    I did spend more initially but research led me to butchers who sell me the off-cuts and carcases at 60p a  kilo   -  and another one who was glad to give me what I wanted because he had to pay to get his waste removed so I was saving him money  :-).    However am I right in thinking that food is more expensive in Australia than it is in the UK?    Some of the tv programs I've seen suggests it is.

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Have you thought of investing in a dehydrator?   I make my own treats for my boys  -  using chicken breast, lambs liver and lambs hearts.   Occasionally I get a lamb 'pluck' (lungs, pancreas, spleen etc) for next to nothing from the butcher and dehydrate these as well.   The one I have cost me £36  -  and I made the money back in a couple of months with the savings on the expensive treats.   The other advantage is that you know exactly what is in the treat you are giving.
I reckon it costs me £60 a month to feed two dogs  i.e.  £1 a day each.    I did spend more initially but research led me to butchers who sell me the off-cuts and carcases at 60p a  kilo   -  and another one who was glad to give me what I wanted because he had to pay to get his waste removed so I was saving him money  :-).    However am I right in thinking that food is more expensive in Australia than it is in the UK?    Some of the tv programs I've seen suggests it is.
I actually have thought of getting a dehydrater but never got around to properly researching them. I'm not sure on comparable food pricing lamb necks, roo tails, other assorted dog bones from the local pet meat supplier is $5.99 a kilo so probably could get it cheaper directly from a butcher but only feed occasionally so it's not a massive expense.

Sent from my [device_name] using http://Husky Owners mobile app

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