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Hi everyone this is the first time after a 10 years to pet again a dog. I'm training my 2 months old puppy to sit. Sometimes he just follow my command but sometimes he will stare in my hand , having the treat, and suddenly will attack my finger and accidentaly bite my finger. Any recommendation to train my dog to bite or to play gently? Btw, my daily routine to my dog is when he wakes up, we go outside to get potty and after that I give his meal and after 10 mins or right before he finish his meal we go outside again to have a potty and then we go inside of our house and will train for a bit and after a minute we go play. Same routine when he gets his nap. Is it okay? Am I doing it right? because what I observe with my puppy is he always want to play and sleep rather than to train haha when we are going to training he still wants to play. I also having concern with his chewing habits sometimes he chew our slippers im trying to distract him by giving his toy to bite but after giving it it will just go back to my slipper and will bite it or sometimes he will never notice the toy to distract him stop biting our slippers :( . But still i love my puppy. I will send some videos in this topic  when we are training :D

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I really hope this doesn't bother anyone as I know that their are many different ways to train. But what I did worked wonders and very fast. When my doggo was just a young pup I would play aggressive but whenever he was too rough I would respond in kind and go ouch and shove him away. Most of the time he wasn't trying to be rough it was more those needle puppy teeth! But a loud ouch and stopping playtime for a few min I usually forcebly held him down for a minute which he hated. This was a substitute for the kennel since I never kennel trained him. But now he is so gentle I can grab his k9 teeth and plug tug of war with just my fingers and he never ever nips, snaps or bites.

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18 hours ago, TheIcePhoenix said:

When my doggo was just a young pup I would play aggressive but whenever he was too rough I would respond in kind and go ouch and shove him away.

I tried this and what he did is he chew other thing lol

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Isolation and removing the dog from the situation will soon teach them what behaviour is good and what behaviour sees them in time out away from anything they can chew. We used to just use distraction and say no when she'd bite our hands. She's now 1.5years and brings us toys to play with and doesn't bite us. She will mouth our hands as a sign of trust but never bites. Just keep it consistent as they won't know what's acceptable or not after a week it might take a month or two just be patient and show praise when they chew or play with their toy

 

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Please keep in mind your puppy is only 8wks old. Training sessions should only be about 5-10minutes 2-3 times a day. That's all he can mentally handle at one time.
Also with training treats or anything you give him, if he's close to nipping your hand to get the treat, pull your hand back and say "gentle." Keep doing that until he takes the treat gently. It shouldn't take very long for him to catch on.
Hope this helps.[emoji847][emoji191][emoji252]

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On 3/25/2018 at 5:38 PM, petertmartin said:

We used to just use distraction and say no when she'd bite our hands.

 

 

 

 

I'm doing this last day when I said to him "NO" he will go to attack position and bark at me and try to bite me again lol but i just giving him a distraction like his toy

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I'm doing this last day when I said to him "NO" he will go to attack position and bark at me and try to bite me again lol but i just giving him a distraction like his toy

Yes Husky personality is very mischievous and playful he thinks it's a game which you need to stop by removing him for a few minutes then resuming play. Just repeat until he plays nicely he'll learn he is missing out if he does bad play. Huskies hate missing out [emoji1]

 

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17 hours ago, petertmartin said:

Yes Husky personality is very mischievous and playful he thinks it's a game which you need to stop by removing him for a few minutes then resuming play. Just repeat until he plays nicely he'll learn he is missing out if he does bad play. Huskies hate missing out emoji1.png

 

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Yeah I did what you said, when he wants to bite me I said NO and sit on our sofa and after that he will now chew the feet of the sofa and that's the moment where I will distract him by his toy and play to him. Is that alright buddy? Will it train him to not chew things and not to bite me? Haha

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Yeah I did what you said, when he wants to bite me I said NO and sit on our sofa and after that he will now chew the feet of the sofa and that's the moment where I will distract him by his toy and play to him. Is that alright buddy? Will it train him to not chew things and not to bite me? Haha
Distraction and praise when he chews his toy is good. If he becomes too rough with you I'm referring to removing him from the room or you leaving the room all together to teach him that behaviour will get him isolated.

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As he’s so young he just wants to play, everything is a game at the moment. I found having a routine of feeding, training and playing works well, a routine is good for them. When he does something you don’t want him doing, a firm NO (no shouting tho, it can make them nervous) and remove from the room for a couple of minutes at this age. Husky’s are very clever, he’ll soon learn. He will be chewing a lot at this age as he’s teething, be consistent with training and praise him when he gets it right, this is also great for bonding and building trust between you. Good luck [emoji3]


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13 hours ago, petertmartin said:

Distraction and praise when he chews his toy is good. If he becomes too rough with you I'm referring to removing him from the room or you leaving the room all together to teach him that behaviour will get him isolated.

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I tried this when we removed him from the place and put him in other room, he starts chewing things on that room and later on he starts crying. Is it okay what we did? I'm sorry for being importunate

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I tried this when we removed him from the place and put him in other room, he starts chewing things on that room and later on he starts crying. Is it okay what we did? I'm sorry for being importunate
The idea is you remove him to a room or place away from you for a minute or two only. Then reintroduce him. If possible send him to a room with nothing he can chew. We used to actually just redirect with toys and telling her no when she started biting us and it worked because now she knows not to bite and how to play nice

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