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Smnicole14

I just got my first husky pup

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Hello all. I am a first time dog mom and I recently got a husky puppy. Today he is 7 weeks old. I got him when he was 6 weeks old. 

I understand that puppies sleep a lot but I feel like he's sleeping too much.. if that is a real thing? Also, I've been having a hard time getting him to eat the food the breeder gave me that he has been eating. I soaked it it water and he still wouldn't eat it. Today, I got some wet food and mixed it in and he ate it! Which was good.  He drinks tons of water. He has also been to the vet and had his first sets of shots and been dewormed. 

I feel like he should be more playful. He will play for a little bit then go into what seems like a very deep sleep. 

I'm just concerned. Thanks for your help!

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My puppy was exactly the same! He's 8 months now always wanting to play, it all comes in time!!


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As above, 6 weeks is far too young for a pup to be away from their Mum, they should have stayed with her for another 2 weeks. Give him time and he should be ok


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He's still very young, shame he left his mum so soon as the extra 2 weeks is needed to prevent any developmental issues later on. He will settle, he just needs time.


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I agree. Just my opinion, but I might do two things:. 1) If you trust the people you got her from, I would want to take puppy back to the mother Husky to continue nursing until Mama weens her & pushes her away (if that would work). Also, I think you should definitely take her to the Vet because she should want to eat more (and needs it for growing) & not be too lethargic/tired. That's what I'd do because I'm a worrier.

~ANGIE

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Try soaking dry food into plain yogurt.  Mine loved it. Yogurt is good for teet and bones. Don/t soak in milk. After a week he had no problem with dry food.

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Welcome to the huskies world!! Good thing u chose a husky :)
Don't worry he will be fine just needs some time to get used to u and the new place!
I got mine when he was 6 weeks old and it took him 4 days to act normal. Now he is 7 months old and so energetic,wants to play all the time!!! Also, I agree with keeping the puppy with his mom till 8 weeks.

Good luck and show us the puppy


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Adorable!!


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I got mine at 6 weeks old too. She was very sluggish and had diarrhea for the first couple of days. I think it's just because she was so young. Give it time! They sleep a lot when they are young. He will adjust! Your pup is so pretty! Fluffy like my Hazel too!


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I am personally very saddened and horrified that the breeder/owner has allowed this pup to leave it's mum this early.. it's not ready yet for full time solids and weaning is combined while still nursing from mum.
This is my personal info/knowledge experience - take it or leave it but.. do research yourself please. ...

Legally it is wrong that this baby and the litter pups have been taken this early, (their eyes have barely fully opened and their hearing still won't be fully developeded; smell is the first as they can scent their mother first to find and suckle..
Nine weeks is (in the UK) the norm although I personally disagree (it used to be a bit older), but, my personal experience (I bred WHW terriers for six years) is that by 12-14 weeks mum stops nursing (or certainly discourages it as little teeth are now quite sharp! Mine generally left between 12-14 weeks. I did all intro to walks traffic car rides clipping grooming examining nail clips indoor house training & disciplines plus bath hair dryer & grooming etc
She also stops cleaning up after them when they start weaning on to soft food and then kibble/solids/or even raw as they come off her milk fully.
Most importantly though pups learn their social skills within the litter pack and mum plays a big part in separating any over zealous play/fighting, bullying and exuberance. This will now be down to you!
Behavioural issues may arise so get reading & researching. www.successdogs.com will help for your positive reward training.

You may need a bottle and some goats milk for this little one with several warmed feeds a day. Test back of your hand with a few drops, it cannot burn their throats.
I started mine on a no wheat/no gluten soft solid so some small size kibble.. (Xcel is good from nursing mums to weaning pups right through to adulthood) and has all important ingredients).
Just add warm goats milk to soften the kibble and feed a tablespoon or two with fresh water by the side.
As I said about five - six meals a day but observe sleeping patterns and don't leave longer than five hours overnight or, if she cries, as hunger and comfort are the two reasons for distress. You may need to gently wipe over her genitals to encourage bladder and bowel movements after feeding as mum does this in the early weeks, and before feeds too.
PLEASE do some research on this.
By 10-12 weeks she'll be exploring so either a crate and playpen area will ensure not being trodden on or getting stuck somewhere, make her safe for all. Taking her outside within 15-30 minutes after feeding onto the lawn will start house training.
You can reduce feeds to four/day around 12 weeks. Three by 14-16 weeks; two by six months although a little snack before bedtime won't hurt and take her out before you retire.
Encourage crate use and for sleeping and if you have a flap with a secure safe garden, she can let herself out otherwise later although a trip out may be necessary if she wakes up crying to go. Don't feed after 6pm but make sure plenty of water is available. Dog Rocks remove nitrates in drinking water and stop your lawn getting patches where she wees. Pick up daily as some pups will pick & eat poo if bored too.
By four-five months she's eating her equivalent adult portion food divided into her alloted three to four meals a day.
A raw egg twice a week - crush in the shells well for calcium.
A pea size coconut oil (too much & you'll have the runs); try out raw veg - cabbage stalks, brocolli, carrots beans.
Great for teething but frozen carrots will also certainly help. Dog chews; rubber rings etc.
Avoid raw bones/antler horns until second teeth (start through at six months) until 10 months as milk teeth can crack.
They do not have enzymes for lactose, onions, raisins, grapes, or any related items, eg., currants. Chocolate is poisonous & Paracetamol is too.
● Kefir - goats milk yoghurt, is very good to keep a healthy gut and the best probiotic I know.
(Mine have two tblspns in their two meals a day. They have Vacpacs: Forthglade/Lovejoy selection (great for dry store & travel/camping) & Albion (frozen) raw with beef, tripe, fish etc.
I don't have enough freezer storage for only raw.

Kefir is good for you too.
It breaks down lactose intolerance as well.
Research this too.

You can partly cover her crate so it's a den. With old blankets /curtains inside and fleece is very comforting.

www.successdogs.com shows how to crate train, wear a harness, head collar (they are natural pullers!) and Dogmatic from Snowpaws work great for mine - measure up right.
Harnesses - Hooner's, Snowpaws (incl basic canibelt) carabiners, K9, Indidog, ManMutt - all have gear you can use. ROK stretch leads save yanked arms & shoulders.
Start as you mean to go on with training because fully grown she won't be so tiny!.
Coats blow twice a year usually anywhere from ten months to after a year - weather plays a part too.
Her first season may be from six months.
PLEASE don't neuter until long bone end growth plates have developed by 24 months. RESEARCH.
Watch her growth spurts and adjust her food so she is not too lanky/lean.
An extra couple handfuls of kibble won't hurt if she's hungry.
Always fresh water available. Remove left over food & bowls once she finishes eating.
If on kibble/raw - two meals a day. Raw only is recommended once a day after a year old.
Exercise occurs naturally through the day running around but 15 mins a day on a lead/harness out walking is best once her jabs/innoculations are done. Add five minutes a day the next month and so on until you reach an hour.
Let her joints & muscles develop and don't ever believe you'll have 100% recall after eight months;
3,000 years' genetics say they are runners, wanderers and with a very high prey drive!
Don't risk it... never off lead unless in a secure area .
6' high fencing and check she's not digging out or for Australia!

Best wishes for your baby.🤗



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MAZ51 ~ Wow! I wish I had seen your invaluable information for when we got our first Husky. I did pretty much most of that by natural instinct thankfully. Our ARMANI and newly adopted ALINAH are wonderful, a little crazy to be expected. But great personal information you provided!

~ANGIE

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Glad to help.. it is only my personal info and there many other really knowledgeable folk out there & on this site too. 🤗

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