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Mine's 10 weeks old, 100% time on leash outside, but literally every single day (multiple times, actually), I experience a sub-split-second take-off, usually when I'm in the middle of a blink, so before I can actually see that she fired up all 16 cylinders (on top of firing the Aries rocket second-stage), my hand is catapulted in the currently-random direction.
All of that happening about 10-15 meters from a road (e.g. about less than a half second worth of distance for her, really). I'm very worried the leash will slip out of my hand, one of these days, as she often just lies quietly on the ground (so, you don't hold the leash so strong for a while), then I accidentally blink, and before my eyes are open (takes a slow-motion 0.1 second), she took off (in totally random direction). Especially when it's raining.
 
There's, literally, sub-zero doubt in my mind, that should she free herself of the leash, I'd have a chance of finding here alive.
 
Now, if that is not a high prey drive yet, I don't know what is.  I'm a big guy, so I don't worry I won't have the strength to hold her when she grows up. Slipping however has zero correlation to strength.
 
 
But, I guess it's time to start thinking of some harness, perhaps ? Just so she's 100% safe and my hands are free ?



A harness does have better security, and if you get a walking belt you don't have to worry about the lead slipping out of your hand :)


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The way I tell the onlead/offlead scenario is of a mate who lives in the 'States. Has 3 Huskies, all raised from pups, all equally trained in recall and 2 he can never, ever let off and 1 he never has

I live in a town too. On the one hand it's good that there's not much in the way of livestock but on the other hand you're talking about the dangers being vehicles instead. I knew a group of peopl

I can tell you now that you will never run as fast as a husky at full pelt...LOLOL

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3 minutes ago, Rachael_Astro said:

A harness does have better security, and if you get a walking belt you don't have to worry about the lead slipping out of your hand :)

Thanks for confirmation :)

I just googled something like this:

http://huskyreview.blogspot.com/2008/01/walking-belts.html

 

From the article:

Quote

No more worrying about dropped leashes or losing grip on the leash, you will be dragged along with your husky if they make an escape attempt.

:- )))))))))))

I'm laughing, because she is dragging me now already, at 10 weeks. Though, that's mostly, 'cause I'm afraid to put too much strain on her neck. Few days ago, I've once tried holding strong and she literally flipped a 180-degrees salto, in the middle of the jump (in the air), around her neck (absolutely crazy). Seeing that sent chills down my spine, so I'm now rather running everywhere after her.

 

When does their body/bones grow up sufficiently to stop worrying about hurting their neck ? 12-16 months of age ? Perhaps sooner ?

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18 hours ago, Markulous said:

The way I tell the onlead/offlead scenario is of a mate who lives in the 'States. Has 3 Huskies, all raised from pups, all equally trained in recall and 2 he can never, ever let off and 1 he never has to put on. All down to the individual dog and how biddable they are. Sadly, many think it's just about training and that their dog is that dog that'll always return - sadly, we've been out helping find dogs that have run off. Even sadder, we've not found them before tragedy has struck

I've a boy, 11+ years old, had terrible SA and still suffers. He's got off and just run - luckily in a very rural area (little traffic) and known to be owned by me by the local farmers (so less risk of him being shot). Needless to say, none of our 6 are let off (except the German), unless in the garden (6 foot fence) or a secure area (which we visit regularly)

_MG_0735FB.jpg

There is another Husky who is about 4 years old at the park we go to and she said the same thing, hers is fine off lead. We just let ours off at the park which has fenced in but am wary about her off lead as her recall isn't fantastic and we train and practice this twice a day for almost 2 hours.

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:- )))))))))))
I'm laughing, because she is dragging me now already, at 10 weeks. Though, that's mostly, 'cause I'm afraid to put too much strain on her neck. Few days ago, I've once tried holding strong and she literally flipped a 180-degrees salto, in the middle of the jump (in the air), around her neck (absolutely crazy). Seeing that sent chills down my spine, so I'm now rather running everywhere after her.
 
When does their body/bones grow up sufficiently to stop worrying about hurting their neck ? 12-16 months of age ? Perhaps sooner ?

Have a look at indi-dog , they make fully adjustable harnesses for growing pups and walking belts too , highly recommended and husky owners members get 10% discount too :)

Yeah around a year old is when they've grown up enough to not be so worried

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Harness / Dogmatic head collar will remove pressure off the neck but the Dogmatic will stop the pulling. The dog needs to be measured correctly for tight size (guideline is on Snowpaws) and I know Hooner's have an adjustable 'H' harness but, the head measurement just behind ears is important or she'll grow out of it if she's only 10 months now. You can easily sell on to get another bigger one and one third off original price is about right if it's in good condition.

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When my two were 3 and 4 months old I used to take them to the local park and let them run off lead, I thought I had the only husky's that would come back when called, how naive I was. I have 2 boisterous boys who lead each other astray given the chance. My two are 1 and 10 months old now and they're prey drive has gone mad, Cai had a field mouse today, I take mine to the forest to run free and it's safe, I would never let them off the lead in the park now, sad to say but one of the biggest issues was other dog owners and they're ignorance towards huskies, I've experienced other dog owners scooping their dogs in their arms, had abuse shouted at me etc. Huskies need to run and I'm lucky to have found a place I can on a daily basis.


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I take mine on long walks, and also belong to the city dog park.  Not many people go there so I can let them run in a fenced in area to blow off some steam

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Just an after thought about running off lead, I let mine run off lead in the local park which was prob about half a mile from one end to the other, until Cai was 5-6 months old but he started becoming too familiar with the area and his confidence grew and he started running further away and coming back when he felt like it so that was the end of that. The change happened very quickly in him and all he wanted to do was hunt for mice and squirrels, plenty of both in that park. Never be lulled into a false sense of security thinking that you know your husky 100 %, they are extremely clever independent free thinking dogs and when the mood takes them they're off! I'd never forgive myself if my own ignorance meant they'd come to any harm.


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letting huskys off leads is like giving a child a hand grenade sooner or later it will go off i am sorry for being blunt but no animal or human is 100% reliable 100% of the time it is a simple fact. sorry if that sounds insulting to any one but its true.

in the country a husky or malamute can get loose kill or injure live stock that is not as simple as it sounds yes a farmer will get paid for the loss of the animal but he looses  its young  and breeding potential it could damage his business not for a few weeks but years or decades after. you also have the danger of your dog being stolen by some one who finds it ok some will get sold to good homes but others are sold to abusive homes or worse end up being used as live practice for dog fighting gangs

a dog loose in a town you may say is safer but its not huskys and mals will kill cats and even other dogs as well as any wild life they also risk being run over on roads or getting onto train tracks and the chancs of them being stolen are higher. also you have another risk they will be picked up by a rescue and i hate to say this but the rspca and rescue charirtys in most cases do not understand  huskys or malamutes

the behaviour we see as every day normal happy healthy well addjusted dogs is seen by most as aggression and dangerous meaning a great many  good dogs are being put to sleep in shelters every year as most do not understand the breeds traits and behaviours and use the judgement that any other breed doing that is a risk

 

Huskys and Malamutes are not and i can not stress it enough NORMAL dogs owning any other breed for years  or having read every dog training manual ever printed does not prepair you for owning one the best response i give to some one who says he read X Y Z book on the breed is sorry animals do not read books

so after all is it worth the risk  no

just keeping your dog on a lead saves you from being vilified in your home area, loosing a loved one or causing others to feel that pain and loss

 

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letting huskys off leads is like giving a child a hand grenade sooner or later it will go off i am sorry for being blunt but no animal or human is 100% reliable 100% of the time it is a simple fact. sorry if that sounds insulting to any one but its true.
in the country a husky or malamute can get loose kill or injure live stock that is not as simple as it sounds yes a farmer will get paid for the loss of the animal but he looses  its young  and breeding potential it could damage his business not for a few weeks but years or decades after. you also have the danger of your dog being stolen by some one who finds it ok some will get sold to good homes but others are sold to abusive homes or worse end up being used as live practice for dog fighting gangs
a dog loose in a town you may say is safer but its not huskys and mals will kill cats and even other dogs as well as any wild life they also risk being run over on roads or getting onto train tracks and the chancs of them being stolen are higher. also you have another risk they will be picked up by a rescue and i hate to say this but the rspca and rescue charirtys in most cases do not understand  huskys or malamutes
the behaviour we see as every day normal happy healthy well addjusted dogs is seen by most as aggression and dangerous meaning a great many  good dogs are being put to sleep in shelters every year as most do not understand the breeds traits and behaviours and use the judgement that any other breed doing that is a risk
 
Huskys and Malamutes are not and i can not stress it enough NORMAL dogs owning any other breed for years  or having read every dog training manual ever printed does not prepair you for owning one the best response i give to some one who says he read X Y Z book on the breed is sorry animals do not read books
so after all is it worth the risk  no
just keeping your dog on a lead saves you from being vilified in your home area, loosing a loved one or causing others to feel that pain and loss
 


It's a truism that no dog is 100% reliable off lead and clearly Huskys are just about the worst. That said it is not true that no Husky is safe off lead, some can some can't. I would however advise caution and if there is any doubt I would advise against it. I also agree they can be pretty 'sneaky' and lull you into a false sense of security before doing a runner. Also agree Huskys are not normal dogs - I thought Collies were 'bonkers' but Huskys on a different level. That's why I love them.


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