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Training An Untrained Boxer


racerx780
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My sister & BIL got a boxer puppy back in Jan '13.... unfortunately, he is not well behaved at all. They both work.. and I don't know what they do in the evenings, but they don't seem to try and teach him anything. My parents live with them, and my dad is retired, so he has to deal with the dog most of the day. The dog is either outside, or inside in his crate. 

 

My sister is going on vacation next week, so I was thinking of trying to spend some time with him to train him. It's only for 9 days... so I'm not even sure if it's worth it. 

 

I just feel bad for him because if he's not inside, he's in the crate because he can't even sit still. He jumps up on everyone, and he slobbers a ton, which isn't exactly fun having dog slobber all over your clothes. 

 

I don't have a husky yet, so I honestly haven't really read a lot of the threads dealing with ways to train them. 

 

I do foster puppies from time to time and have applied many things I've read to them... but they are normally 7-10 wks old. I'm not sure how much my sister's dog will be able to learn in a little over a week.

 

Any suggestions???

 

 

Thanks!!

 

 

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First of all, thank you for caring so much about this little puppy :) boxers are one of those super energetic breeds. They can not live with a family that expect them to sit still all day long. The slobber? I'd guess that's because of the stress. I don't know if boxers supposedly drool or not but excessive saliva does indicate stress. So if you give this pup the exercise, attention and affection he deserves there's a chance he'd slobber less.

 

Now about the real question. Racer, no matter how much you care about this baby dog, he's not yours. Try to talk to your sister and her husband first regarding whether they want you to train him or not. By the way, nine days of training might actually change him into a different dog if you're consistent :) I hope the moment your sister see that training her "monster dog" is actually doable, she would start giving him more attention. Honestly working is not an excuse. Most of our members work full-time and I bet you know how much work huskies are. Still, they get both the dog and the job sorted. Your sister can hire a dog walker if she can't walk the boxer, and she can seek a trainer's advice if she doesn't know where to start with the puppy's training. 

 

Training a puppy, training a dog... honestly, what's the big difference? :P if you're used to training a pup and have been successful with it, I don't see why you would be incapable of training an older dog. Just walk the dog for a start and tire him out, then work your way from there :) good luck! xxx

 

EDIT forgot to say that I'd LOVE to hear updates about this baby boxer :) so please keep us updated. Not implying anything, but usually this is the start of a sad story about a misunderstood dog that ends up in a shelter :( so if you can train the boxer and make everything work out, that'd be really cool 

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Here is a picture of him back in January.. probably about 10 wks old at that point.

 

levi-1.jpg

 

Thanks for the comments...

 

They had a boxer before... It was a female, and very different temperament.. I can't remember if they got her as a puppy or not... but she wasn't nearly as hyper, or large in size, as Levi is. (I don't have any pictures of her) I really don't see them rehoming Levi... They aren't that type, and I think my nieces would be too upset if they did, so I don't think it would even be a possibility. 

 

I feel bad for him... and for my parents. Levi is full of so much energy and my father is getting up there in age, so it's been hard on him the most. Whenever I go over, I let Levi out of his crate and keep him near me... I feel bad for him being in the crate as much as he is, but unless he calms down, I don't see that changing unfortunately. 

 

I'm not sure why my sister & BIL have chosen to go pretty light on training him... the way he is, he's not even enjoyable as a pet. Which is a shame.... and he really is a cool dog - he's a huge goof that's fun to play rope tug with. :) 

 

I dunno... would it be a waste of my time? Probably.... I just feel bad for him & my parents. 

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He's a cutie! Tough call, I can see you really want to help but without your sisters consent there's only so much you can do right now. Have you tried talking to her and offering her some help with training and exercise etc.....? Probably a good place to start and if she agree you can go from there... Good luck. Xxx

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I have not spoken to her about it... honestly, I feel it's not my place. I don't live there... he's not my dog... If anyone should talk, it should be my parents and my sister & BIL. (They all live in the same house, and while it's somewhat divided, the dog is in my parents area when my sister & BIL aren't home) 

 

Which is why I was thinking if I could do something that would help the whole situation why they were on vacation...... 

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I have not spoken to her about it... honestly, I feel it's not my place. I don't live there... he's not my dog... If anyone should talk, it should be my parents and my sister & BIL. (They all live in the same house, and while it's somewhat divided, the dog is in my parents area when my sister & BIL aren't home) 

 

Which is why I was thinking if I could do something that would help the whole situation why they were on vacation......

Oh right, sorry I thought you were all under one roof. Yeah, I see your point. To be fair, as already mentioned you can certainly try but if it's not a continued effort by all then any progress you make will be short lived.

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Yeah, my place is about 25 min from theirs. While it's a fairly large house, I couldn't live there. lol Not without big problems. hahahahaha

 

 

What I'd like is for them to come home and notice a difference in him... then I would let them know what I've done, and at that point, the ball would be in their court if they wish to continue. 

 

Of course, in 8 yrs or so when he's well long in his life, he'll probably calm down.  :rofl:

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I've always maintained that dogs are like kids of about 3 - 5 years old (and someone provided us with scientific proof of that recently).

If I were in your shoes I think I'd offer to keep the dog for the time they're on holiday - with the understanding that you'll be doing some work with him while he's with you.  If they're okay with that, then you have the "go ahead" to help the poor pup out some.

The reason that I mention kids - when a "wild child" is suddenly tossed into a place where they have to obey the rules, they do either of two things - they accept the rules and, for the time being, adapt or they rebel.  It's the ones who adapt who are the most interesting since they fall right back into line when the "disciplinarian" reappears, even if it's just for a visit. 

I'm thinking that if you get this little guy for the week plus, really put some work into it and then visit (often?) when they return from vacation you may be able to show them a changed dog.  If you can (depending on their ages) get the nieces on board with his training and maybe the g-parents as well ... well, good things could happen for him.

 .... Just my two cents, hope things work out for the best for the little guy (and you, too, of course! :) )

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Here is a picture I took today when I was at their house. Nothing was near him to give you a good idea of his size... but he's pretty big. 

 

levi-2.jpg

 

They leave tomorrow am. I have to work and then I have plans tomorrow nite, but starting saturday I plan to spend time with him, and trying to train him the best I can with the limited time I have. 

 

We'll see. :) 

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I wanted to get a boxer, I still do.

 

they are chewers, hyper, bouncy, and so loveable.

 

I am sorry if this is going to sound harsh, but being in a crate or tide up all day isn't much of a life for a dog. and TBH he is probably mental because he has so much energy from doing...NOTHING.

 

in theory its not your problem, but because you're an animal lover you make it your problem...just as I would, we're suckers for animals it cant be helped.

 

Although there are breed specifics not every dog is the same, however as a standard...

 

From Wiki....

 

The character of the Boxer is of the greatest importance and demands the most solicitous attention. He is renowned from olden times for his great love and faithfulness to his master and household. He is harmless in the family, but distrustful of strangers, bright and friendly of temperament at play, but brave and determined when aroused. His intelligence and willing tractability, his modesty and cleanliness make him a highly desirable family dog and cheerful companion. He is the soul of honesty and loyalty, and is never false or treacherous even in his old age.

— 1938 AKC Boxer breed standard[14]
 

Boxers are a bright, energetic and playful breed and tend to be very good with children. They are active, strong dogs and require adequate exercise to prevent boredom-associated behaviors such as chewing, digging, or licking. Boxers have earned a slight reputation of being "headstrong," which can be related to inappropriate obedience training. Owing to their intelligence and working breed characteristics, training based on corrections often has limited usefulness. Boxers, like other animals, typically respond better to positive reinforcement techniques such as clicker training, an approach based on operant conditioning and behaviorism, which offers the dog an opportunity to think independently and to problem-solve.[15][16]Stanley Coren's survey of obedience trainers, summarized in his book The Intelligence of Dogs, ranked Boxers at #48 – average working/obedience intelligence. Many who have worked with Boxers disagree quite strongly with Coren's survey results, and maintain that a skilled trainer who uses reward-based methods will find Boxers have far above-average intelligence and working ability.[15][16][17]

The Boxer by nature is not an aggressive or vicious breed. It is an instinctive guardian and can become very attached to its family. Like all dogs, it requires proper socialization.[18] Boxers are generally patient with smaller dogs and puppies, but difficulties with larger adult dogs, especially those of the same sex, may occur. Boxers are generally more comfortable with companionship, in either human or canine form.

 

 

think of it this way....you've had way to many energy drinks, your thoughts and conversation including your movement are very fast, and change regularly, you cant focus on one thing because your too interested in the next......A high strung out boxer will be hard to train until you have taken the edge of its energy.

 

My advise, take the lad for a walk, and then try a bit of training, make him work for his treats too....with my boys I hold a treat in one hand and the other hand in a closed fist, I say "Touch" and to get the treat he has to touch the closed fist...you can see them trying to work it out cause every time they go for the treat you pull it away, they then go and investigate the other hand and as a result they get the treat....slowly they stop going for the treat and touch you hand straight away...

 

In honesty there is no reason to train this, but to just get their mind going.

 

GD luck :)

 

Toni, K&P

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  • 3 weeks later...

Unfortunately, the day after my sister & family went on vacation, I got a call to foster a pair of yellow lab puppies. :) 

 

So my attention was devoted to them... and not Levi. While I want to help him, fostering puppies is kindof my thing that I do. 

 

They got adopted yesterday though, so I'm going to see what I can do with Levi this week perhaps. 

 

5.jpg

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I used to walk a friends dog, he used to pull all the time, until i spent some time with him - never pulled with me again.

 

He also used to race you up the stairs, especially when 'grandma' had a basket of washing and got told off a lot for that, i stopped that and he never beat me up the stairs!

 

All you can do is try your best, like Al says, if he gets it, he'll always be good for you, hopefully you can pass that back on to his real owners.

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