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Demiurge

General Tips / What to expect / What to plan for

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OK, bear with me folks. A little introduction here.

I picked up my Sibes at a local shelter. Found the female, debated it for a week, pulled the trigger. The day I picked her up, ended up deciding to get the male. I did not do proper research ahead of time, and found out later that I wasn't properly prepared. In my quest for information and tips, I found this site. It has been a life saver!

Now...what I'd like to do with this thread is help out all the other people that are new to Sibes, or are looking into Sibes. So please, if you have some tips, a heads up on what to expect, or something people should plan for, please post them up! I'll do what I can to keep the first post updated with all of the suggestions and ideas that you guys put out. If you disagree with a suggestion or tip, please post that too! A little conversation can be a huge benefit for getting education out there.

Now, understanding that I'm pretty dang new, here's what I've got, and what I'd like to start with:

Vets - Find a good local vet, preferably with experience in Huskies. This should be done prior to bringing home your new pup/juvenile/rescue.

From Becky on finding the right vet:

Look for a friendly atmosphere with a caring staff (at all levels - from the vet, to the techs, to the reception staff). Is the office, including the waiting area clean? How is the wait area cleaned if a pet has an accident? Do vet and staff have their own pets?

How is equipment sterilized after use? (From the scales and tables to surgical equipment and kennels - you need to know this for your pet's safety)

What are after hour proceedures? Will the vet come in after hours or are you required to have a second, emergency vet? What payment options are available? Do they accept insurance? Do they have boarding kennels? What if your pet is hospitalized - can you visit? Do they have an association with a nearby vet college (for those problem sickly pets! LOL)? Can most testing can be done in house? (if sent out it will cost you a lot more). Can he/she explain what's going on with your pet so that you truly understand the problem? Are they willing to call in assistance or refer you elsewhere if your pet comes down with something they don't have experience with? And lastly, what does your heart tell you? Does it say 'trust this man'? If not, keep looking!

Schedule a vet visit ASAP once you know when you'll be bringing your Sibe home. Even if you're getting your Sibe from a reputable breeder, it's a good idea to have a general check up. Obviously, this means you need to plan for this expense. While I was ready for the checkup, I ended up with 2 Sibes, and the extra cost was more than I planned for.

Have the money set aside for an emergency vet visit. This should include the maximum cost you can reasonably expect to incur. Plan for an after hours trip (emergencies aren't always convenient!), a check up fee, x-rays, etc. The last thing you want to do is bring home your new Sibe and not have the money to cover an emergency! This could be anything from a sudden illness, weight loss, the runs, eating something it shouldn't, etc.

Plan for lots of exercise! I think the general rule is 5 minutes per month of age for pups (if I remember wrong, please correct me!). Mine are about a year old and have tons of energy! I did not expect them to be as active as they are, and I have had to adjust my schedule to fit. We do lengthy walks, and go to the dog park twice a week. This weekend I will be trying rollerblades to get them the exercise they need.

Try to find a good dog food. There's some good discussion here on BARF (bones and raw food) in the health forum. You can also check out Dog Food Analysis for reviews on various foods. Personally, I have selected Taste of the Wild (TOTW) for now, but will most likely end up switching to BARF.

Information on breeders, courtesy of terrysibe:

1) A good breeder would not breed from untested stock, (and I don't mean the vet said its alright)

2) A good breeder would only breed from the best they have, to improve what they had

3) A good breeder would breed to the the breed standard, (it's there for a reason)

4) A good breeder would show or work their dogs so that they know what a good Siberian is,

5) A good breeder would only breed from KC registered dogs, therefore they have a family tree being their dogs

A bad breeder is someone who has 2 dogs that have never been health tested and says sod ya I want a litter its my right,

It may be your right, BUT ARE YOU DOING THE RIGHT THING FOR THE DOG AND THE BREED.

OK, folks, that's what I've got off the top of my head. I'll probably come up with more later (chewing and chew toys, howling when left alone, dealing with neighbors). So add some tips and suggestions and let's see if we can't get a proper list of what to expect, what to plan for, and general tips and advice. I'll edit as we go, so please, keep me busy!

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Yes, definitely plan for lots of exercise! lol!

Im at my wits end keeping up with chewy and trying to walk the kids along too!

We walk for an hour each day but thats not enough now apparently, and im exhausted from trying to keep up with chewy and trying to make sure my kiddos keep up too!

I suggest if you have kids you should def plan on getting a bike and kids bike trailer by the time your sibe is 9 months old. I waited too long...lol. Dont wait if you can save the money ahead of time.

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excellent made into a sticky 686memo_sticky.jpg

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I walk my two with a lurcher which always makes them run a bit faster - they go off lead in a secure field for about an hour and a half every night plus have the run of my large garden all the rest of time and still need more - especially the alasakan who it seems has the same kind of energy pack as the terminator!!! - they never get enought even when we go lurcher racing with them!! but hey keeps you walking and that cannot be a bad thing - hope you have many many years of love and luck - also maybe insurance would be a good thing as my kobi cost the insurance company over 1000 pounds in the first ten days after braking his leg!! then fee snapped his cruciate ligament another 600 - thank god for insurance

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A visit to the vet office you're considering is a must in my opinion. If the vet and staff don't have time to get to know you and your expectations, will they have time to properly treat your husky? I visited my vet before changing several years ago. I was impressed with the amount of time he made to answer my questions and show me around. He understands how important it is to be cautious with anesthesia with a husky due to their slower metabolism. You need to ask about emergency hours, payment options, and understand his/her general animal care logic. (Are they all about the almighty dollar or are they about the quality of life?) Will they answer questions on the phone for you?

The next visit included my husky. Not only did the vet get to know Bo, but the techs and office staff as well.

Now, when we go, it's quite likely that the furry kids are greeted before me (by name, I might add!)

I know that my vet understands what lengths I'll go to for my furry family. He also knows where I won't. I have no problem going on vacation while leaving Bo with my daughter. I trust my vet to care for Bo should he need anything while I am gone. He knows that Bo's quality of life is my top priority. We've had a discussion regarding Bo's end of life care - what I need to watch for, what I can expect, and most importantly, what Bo WON'T show me as we near that time.

A good vet is difficult to find.......I'm a very fortunate husky owner!

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When looking for a vet, what would you suggest that people look for? What questions do you recommend asking?

Look for a friendly atmosphere with a caring staff (at all levels - from the vet, to the techs, to the reception staff). Is the office, including the waiting area clean? How is the wait area cleaned if a pet has an accident? Do vet and staff have their own pets?

How is equipment sterilized after use? (From the scales and tables to surgical equipment and kennels - you need to know this for your pet's safety)

What are after hour proceedures? Will the vet come in after hours or are you required to have a second, emergency vet? What payment options are available? Do they accept insurance? Do they have boarding kennels? What if your pet is hospitalized - can you visit? Do they have an association with a nearby vet college (for those problem sickly pets! LOL)? Can most testing can be done in house? (if sent out it will cost you a lot more). Can he/she explain what's going on with your pet so that you truly understand the problem? Are they willing to call in assistance or refer you elsewhere if your pet comes down with something they don't have experience with? And lastly, what does your heart tell you? Does it say 'trust this man'? If not, keep looking!

I could go on and on about what I asked my current vet....while others may think these are silly questions but Bo was rather sickly as a pup and I learned the hard way before I found this vet.

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setting money aside is a great tip, I have had a few 200$+ visits pop up and it sucks. That and they will try to eat EVERYTHING they can fit in their mouth, when you think your house is clear and safe, they will still find something

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before i got my first Odin i did my research an lots of it, second i got every thing i needed before i got my sib, collar, lead, harness, crate, toys every thing was here waiting for him.

I also made sure we had the first 2 weeks at home i took first week off work hubby the second, then i found this site and as you said it's a life saver. xxx

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NO. 1 top tip I can offer? Specially if your getting a pup?

EAR PLUGS! They were a godsend for the first few weeks at night while my pup settled in and howled the night away! They sound so sad that if you can hear them you'll want to go to them and pet them and play with them and its aaaall downhill from there on coz then you have a husky that knows that all it has to do is cry and howl and you come running... makes trying to sleep pretty much an impossibilty! So Ear plug yourself up for the first few weeks and you'll save yourself and your pup a hell of alot of re-training!

Second best tip: Nylabones and kong toys: both wonderful, Nylabones for you husky to chew instead of your sofa, your best cushions, your walls etc! and Kong toy for when you need to leave them and you dont want them to get bored!

Third best: Carrots! Wonderful teeth cleaning tools, give your husky one to chew, their cheaper than dental sticks and most huskies I know of love um, specially when teething you can get them nice and cold out of the fridge and the cold is good for their gums.

Thats my best info! biggrin.gif

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As some one that adopted her first Sibe last November, I would say this:

If you don't think you can spend 45 to an hour exercising your dog every single day, never get a Sibe.

If you think that putting a dog in a crate/run ("cage") is mean, never get a Sibe.

If you think you know everything there is to know about training a dog, don't get a Sibe.

If you don't have a thick skin to brush off comments like "cat killer" or "wolf", never get a Sibe.

I, of course, knew none of this, but I wouldn't give Rina up for all the tea in China. She's precious, but she isn't a lab. ;)

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We did our research before getting Bomby our Sibe but all the research in the world doesn't prepare you for reality!

We new they lost ALOT of fur but honestly our lawn looks like its covered in snow and it doesn't even snow here!!

They are very bossy and act like a 2yr old as far as tantrums go - a simple command like telling him to sit will start him off with the wines/cries of not wanting to listen before finally saying ok i will do as im told....

Needing lots of exercise is a must - my husband has found that out, in just over a month of running/walking our Sibe at least once a day he has lost 8kgs which is great but sometimes having a night at home without having to take Bomby out in the rain/hail or shine would be nice. We have also had to take someone on to run Bomby during the week now and then to help with boredom.

We love our big baby but they never give you a rest...lol, so just be prepared :blink:

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They need lots of exercise, but training them is another way to tire them out mentally and physically.

+1 on the earplugs! New puppies will scream the first few nights they are in a new place, but if you ignore them (still let them out every now an then through the night, they are puppies and can't hold it in that long) they will eventually get over it and sleep quietly in their crate.

It's easy to teach them commands, but hard to get them to listen to them every time!

A husky will never be a good off-leash dog. They find other things way too interesting and will quickly run out of sight.

Huskies have high prey drive and are usually not good with cats unless they were raised with them and still you shouldn't trust them to be alone with a cat.

Puppies chew on anything they can find, so crate them when you are not home. Having a room that's puppy proof is a life saver too.

Huskies are notorious at jumping fences or digging under them.

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wow isnt it crazy how sibes differ - spearo says they are bossy - but mine arent

and sara u mention they will scream the house down when u 1st got them - but none of mine did :blink: lol and the chewing - 1 chewed the other never has apart from paper which he grew out of after about a week lol

i agree with the exercise mine get 80mins to an hour a day broken up and they do just fine

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I have had alot of dogs, but this is only my second husky, I still struggle with some aspects that differ from other dogs, (and yes huskys are very different than other dogs), but what I read, applied, and feel has helped me greatly is establishing the pack order, or alpha in your dog early, training, and exercise is going to be challenging enough, you dont need the power struggle on top of that, like I had with my brothers (our first) husky, who displayed all the negative traits of a poorly trained/adapted husky, destroying everything in sight, doesn't listen to a thing, and a master escape artist, slipping a seemingly impossible to slip collar, digging holes under the fence in minutes, even scalling 8 foot fences with grace

Huskies have a high rehoming rate for a reason, My brothers husky was rehomed due to Court Order after she blindsided a kid (playfully) walking to school, (she also had a impound record, for all the times she escaped and dissappeared.)

(the judge was a donkey, but you see my point)

Some of the Alpha tips that worked for me:

1)Go through doorways first, then your dog, (if going out as a family, the dog goes last

2)Dont let the dog in your bed until Alpha is firmly established

3)Dont go to your dog to give him/her affection, make him/her come to you

4)Tend to you dog needs, alpha needs to be established out of respect, NOT FEAR, you dog needs to know you will provide for it,

5) You eat before your dog

6) if you dog is in your way, make him/her move, dont go around her, (dont be mean or violent) just a gentle nudge or command

Lastly they need a reason for everything they do, or you want them to do, HEALTHY treats, and praise, and lots of toys

They are going to do what they want to do, make what u want them to do the more appealing

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Good post.

Lastly they need a reason for everything they do, or you want them to do, HEALTHY treats, and praise, and lots of toys

They are going to do what they want to do, make what u want them to do the more appealing

I found that making liver biscuits for Merlin works a treat, He will do anything for these biscuits and it’s amazing just how fast he can learn something with these.

Boil liver for 5 minutes then grill until cooked dry.

Or

1lb liver

1lb flour - preferably granary

3 eggs

2 cloves garlic (optional)

1 teaspoon oil

splosh of milk

Liquidise liver with eggs, milk, oil & garlic in blender.

Add to flour & mix

Put into a microwavable dish & hollow it slightly in middle, then cook on full power for about 10 mins.

Cut into slices & freeze.

Serve frozen as they dont last.

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If you have anything you don't want chewed, don't leave it out especially leather shoes!!

Expect to have your life taken over by them. You will never just have one (I do but I want another at some point in the future).

Be responsible about training. Also be patient because there will be times when they just ignore you unless you give them some incentive (food) and even then if there is something more interesting expect to be ignored.

Have time to walk them, Yuri gets 40 mins at the moment as he is only 8 months (almost).

Never let them off lead, if you feel bad about it then don't get one.. it's for their safety! The only place they can really be off lead is in enclosed areas.

Get a bike, they are great for excersising them with side converters or bikejoring.

I love my boy and would never be with out him. But he's actually very very quiet. He didn't howl as we had him in our room and I slept next to his crate for the first week and then slowly moved away. He only howls if someone comes over (a short person) as he is such a big boy now and still likes to jump up (start training classes tomorrow) so knocks many people I know flying :lol:

My boy got all the best parts of a sibe and all the random parts of a Collie, but I love him to bits.

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I'd say make sure you absolutely have money saved away, who knows how many "worried husky parent trips" you will make, just worried or if something happens. Cally ran into a bench at the dog park when she was around 4 months and we had to rush her to the vet because her nose was bleeding and swelled up. You just never know!

Also, they dig, they escape, they howl, they love to run(lots of exercise), they like to talk back. Make sure you have collar, leash, toys, treats, crate etc.

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As some one that adopted her first Sibe last November, I would say this:

If you don't think you can spend 45 to an hour exercising your dog every single day, never get a Sibe.

If you think that putting a dog in a crate/run ("cage") is mean, never get a Sibe.

If you think you know everything there is to know about training a dog, don't get a Sibe.

If you don't have a thick skin to brush off comments like "cat killer" or "wolf", never get a Sibe.

I, of course, knew none of this, but I wouldn't give Rina up for all the tea in China. She's precious, but she isn't a lab. ;)

my mya is a loonatic walked min. 2 hours a day

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I got Kahlan from a friend who had a forgetful moment and his Sibe and his new live in girlfriends Sibe had not been spayed or neutered and were unpleasantly surprised when the female got pregnant and decided to sell the puppies to help with university costs as well as getting Kahlan's parent's spayed and neutered. I would like to warn people about getting a Husky and it has been said before is that they blow their coat twice a year and even though I knew this the first time it happened to Kahalan I called my vet since the amount of hair lose looked that bad (no bald spots just a apartment (flat) full of hair). I would like to warn future Husky owners that twice a year your Husky will blow its coat and it will seem worse than what you hear about unless they have bald spots it is okay       

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