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New Puppy And I Need Advice


CARRINGTON
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Ten days ago I brought home from the local humane society a 13 week old puppy, who just happens to be husky mixed with something else (no one is 100% sure but could be hound). This is my fiance's and I's first dog together as well as my first time with a husky. My fiance had a husky when he was younger but did not do any training since he was so little. I know everyone says not to get a husky unless you have worked with them before but we all have to start somewhere and he is our starting place. We are at our end with him (we are not going to give him up, however, this is a learning process that will take time and we just have to find what works for this breed). He jumps up on us, nips at us, climbs on the furniture and when we take him off and tell him no he just gets back up there like it is a game to him, tries to knock us over to get out the door, becomes fixated on my cat and chases her down. He knows sit and that is about all, we are working on other commands but we need help with these problems first. We have even tried NILIF and that worked for a day but now he gets aggressive if we try that. Maybe we aren't doing it right. He is good on a leash and walks excelently. Any advice would be helpful at this point. I know people say pets are as smart as thier owners, we are smart but this is our first husky and we are determined to learn from this as we are to teach him. Any advice would be helpful. We have enrolled him in puppy classes but that starts in two weeks and we need to start trying something that will be effective now for the problems listed above.

 

Thanks,

 

Carrington

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Puppy classes will help i promise. As for the nipping, honestly it takes time! It was about 6 months before Luka completely stopped mouthing/attempting to bite my hand off. haha

 

Luka was really bad about jumping, he still does occasionally but for the most part has stopped. If he jumps on me i completely walk away from him, i won't even look at him. He gets completely ignored. After a few times he learned jumping = no attention and he was not happy with that.

 

As for the jumping on furniture, i can't help there. Mine are allowed on whatever they want, as they sleep in the bed.

 

All i can tell you is it takes patience and being consistent! it really does feel like it will take forever but it will happen if you stay on top of it. 10 days isn't long enough to made an impression on him. These problems won't go away overnight and not even in a week but they will go away with the right training. Tell your trainer about the issues you are having. They can help.

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Firstly welcome to the forurm.

 

How long did you try the NILIF method? If you can ellaborate on what you are doing there is likely to be someone who can offer further advice

 

Are you crate training him?

 

The only advice I can give you at the moment is for you both to use the same method with him and be consistent.  Note I don't have any cats so can't comment on that aspect of the problem.

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Like LittleLuka said puppy classes will help and it really is a case of perseverance. Kodiak still pushes his luck and probably will for a good few months still! We found the NILF method to work really well but again this takes time. At the end of the day he is only 13 weeks old and it does take time. They like to push their luck with everything but you sound like you are doing everything you can at the moment. Try and stand with your back to him with folded arms when he is being too much and he might get the message that his behaviour is unacceptable. Again we have done this with Kodiak and it does work, I still have to do it every now and then when he has a real bad case of the zoomies indoors!

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NILF for sure. Don't give up on that.

 

Jumping on furniture, we taught Niko an 'up' and 'off' command. He's not allowed on the furniture unless he's called 'up', no exceptions. As a young puppy when they put their paws on the edge of furniture gently knock them off and tell them 'Off', then ignore them completely. If they persist, continue with slightly more firm 'offs' until they lost interest. Every time you call them 'up' always make sure to give the 'off' command when you're ready to set them down. Give them a slight push until they have to jump off on their own, then praise them.

 

As for cats. When Niko was a puppy he was allowed to watch the cats and only play with them if they started it. If he was paying attention and a cat ran by we either A) Make a 'AH AH!' noise and stopped him because he attempted chase, or B) Praised him for watching the cat without giving chase. (It's also important to note that for the first month Niko was either on a leash at our side, asleep in his kennel, or boxed into area where we could watch and get to him at all times.) It was also very helpful to teach him the 'Leave it' command early and often and use it when he showed interest in the cats. If the cats started play with him, they were watched carefully and if any roughness was noticed, he was stopped from play and not allowed to play again for a few moments. If he was gentle, he was praised and allowed to continue play.  He now stays in the rooms with cats and does not bother them. He does not start play unless they do and when he does play he is EXTREMELY gentle.

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First, Welcome to the forum and did you all ever bite off a bit a good chew for a "first dog"!

 

The advice you've gotten so far is about the best going.  He's a puppy and they'll push every limit they can find.  In the dog world, there's something known as "puppy license" - meaning that the other bigger dogs around will allow them a whole lot of leeway "sine they're just a puppy".  Since you've replaced his pack, he's going to expect to be able to get away with the things that his dog "parents" would have allowed ...

As the puppy in the pack grows older, they'll eventually start correcting him but since it's all instinct to them, they'll all do it just about the same way.  You can't operate on their instincts so you have to figure out what's going to work for you and him.

As others have said, consistency is going to be half of the battle - the other half is patience.  After all, he is only just a puppy and like any newborn he doesn't know any better.

I don have to tell you what patience is; don't hit, don't yell, assume that everything is going to take furever before it gets through his think (husky stubborn!) little skull.

Consistency, more than anything is going to be your hardest part.  You don't want him on the couch - fine, but make sure that no one picks him up and hold him on their lap on the couch, he'll see that as being inconsistent and not sure which way to take it.  If you want him to wait to go out the door, make sure he doesn't ever go out ahead of you - even if that means someone has the leash on him and is holding him by the leash when you open the door. 

Figure, he's only a little kid and it's going to take time and please, don't give up - in time he'll really be worth all the frustration.

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I agree with what everyone else has said. Nikko is 14 months old and still pushes us. Puppy classes for sure but those are more for you than the dog. They will show you the tools to use but you have to be consistent and work on it every day! It will get better just hang in there! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Thanks everyone for the advice. We are crate training and he is doing pretty good with that. As for the NILIF we make him sit before we take him outside and before we come in so we can try to be out the door first, however, he tries to knock us over to be the first one out. We also do the scooting him with our foot to make him move, but he will bite and growl (which he never did that before). We also feed him after us, and we make him sit or lie down before he is allowed to have his food and that seems to be going pretty well. We have tried turning our backs to him but he just runs in circles around us or chases us down and jumps on us. We are trying the closing his jaw like an alligator for when he bites but I also do not want him afraid of our hands either.

 

What commands work best for everyone for every aspect of dog training? We found a trainer where I live that works with huskies  a lot so hopefully in two weeks this will help with other ideas and methods. He just seems to be more aggressive since starting the NILIF (is it because he wants to be alpha,or are we actually hurting him?) which we do not want him to be more aggressive or scared of us either. We have been trying this NILIF for about 5 days.

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Ten days ago I brought home from the local humane society a 13 week old puppy, who just happens to be husky mixed with something else (no one is 100% sure but could be hound). This is my fiance's and I's first dog together as well as my first time with a husky. My fiance had a husky when he was younger but did not do any training since he was so little. I know everyone says not to get a husky unless you have worked with them before but we all have to start somewhere and he is our starting place. We are at our end with him (we are not going to give him up, however, this is a learning process that will take time and we just have to find what works for this breed). He jumps up on us, nips at us, climbs on the furniture and when we take him off and tell him no he just gets back up there like it is a game to him, tries to knock us over to get out the door, becomes fixated on my cat and chases her down. He knows sit and that is about all, we are working on other commands but we need help with these problems first. We have even tried NILIF and that worked for a day but now he gets aggressive if we try that. Maybe we aren't doing it right. He is good on a leash and walks excelently. Any advice would be helpful at this point. I know people say pets are as smart as thier owners, we are smart but this is our first husky and we are determined to learn from this as we are to teach him. Any advice would be helpful. We have enrolled him in puppy classes but that starts in two weeks and we need to start trying something that will be effective now for the problems listed above.

 

Thanks,

 

Carrington

First of all, slow down and breathe. This too shall pass (eventually). Yes, everyone needs to start somewhere (and now you're learning why a husky isn't always the best place to begin!) Again, breathe!

 

My bet is that the pup's time at the humane society didn't help his manners any. Bite inhabition is taught by mother and siblings. I'm guessing a reminder or two or three is in order. Try a loud yelp or other strong sound to alert him to the fact that his bites hurt. The shrill sound should deter much of the nipping.

 

Jumping up - turn your back to him. He's doing this to get your attention. Turn and ignore. Be consistent. Don't reward the pup one time and ignore the next. All you'll do if that happens is make training begin again.

 

The husky is known for their strong will and determination as you are quickly learning. The best advice I can offer is to determine a training method and stick to it. Consistency is the way to a long and happy life with huskies. That and never letting them see you sweat! LOL

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When you're making him sit at the door and he tries to rush out, make a noise and correct the position. Make him sit until you say the release command 'okay', which is of course, once you're out the door. As said, if he tries to rush the door, just make him sit again. Keep doing this until he finally calms down enough to stay sitting. Praise and say okay. He'll pick up what you want from him in no time. Do the same at the food bowl and before putting him to bed.

 

As for commands...

Up- Simply call your puppy's name and call them to the furniture with a pat, before they reach the edge say 'up' and encourage them to climb or help them up if they can't make the jump yet. Praise and repeat the command.

 

Off- Guide your puppy near the edge of the furniture and tell him 'off'. If he doesn't jump down, just give him a slight nudge until he's forced to jump off the edge himself. Praise him and remind him 'off'.

 

Leave it- Take a treat and hold it in your hand. Tell your puppy 'leave it' and hold it in front of him. If he reaches for the treat go 'ah ah' and pull the treat away from him. Repeat the command until he doesn't reach the treat then praise and tell him 'take it' while offering the treat. Start off making him leave it for a few seconds, and then increase the time as you repeat the commands.

 

Drop it- When your puppy picks up an object tell him 'drop it' and remove the item from his mouth. Praise him and repeat 'drop it'. In addition, you can also teach 'drop it' and 'take it' with toys during playtime. Offer your puppy a toy and say 'take it' praise him for taking it. Then say 'drop it' and take the toy from him. Praise.

 

Sit- Take a treat in your hand and close your palm around it and let your puppy sniff it. Tell him 'sit' and then move your hand over his head making him look up and usually plop his tush on the ground. Praise and treat. If your puppy does not sit when you do the above, you may need to tap his behind while holding the treat. Even if you have to put him in the position, pet him and let him know that's what you're expecting him to do.

 

Lay down- We just use the command 'down' for Niko, so I'm going to replace it for now, but feel free to use 'lay down' if that's what you want to use. :3 Once you've taught 'sit' tell the puppy to sit and present a treat. Say 'down' and allow your puppy to follow the treat to the ground. Once he lays down, treat him. If your puppy is refusing to lay, go ahead and pull his front paws out and put him in the 'down' position. Pet him and try again.

 

Stay- Make your puppy sit and present a treat. Tell your puppy 'stay' hold the treat in front of him. Similar to leave it, if he tries to move, correct him and repeat the command. Once he's stayed for a few seconds, treat him. Repeat, increasing the amount of time you make him stay each time.

 

As you can see, the main point is consistency. You have to make the rules of what's allowed and what's not very clear to your puppy. Have patience with him though, it may take him weeks to learn some commands, just never give up. Don't let him get away with anything, distract from behaviors you don't like and praise, praise, praise, for behaviors you want.

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First of all, slow down and breathe. This too shall pass (eventually). Yes, everyone needs to start somewhere (and now you're learning why a husky isn't always the best place to begin!) Again, breathe!

 

My bet is that the pup's time at the humane society didn't help his manners any. Bite inhabition is taught by mother and siblings. I'm guessing a reminder or two or three is in order. Try a loud yelp or other strong sound to alert him to the fact that his bites hurt. The shrill sound should deter much of the nipping.

 

Jumping up - turn your back to him. He's doing this to get your attention. Turn and ignore. Be consistent. Don't reward the pup one time and ignore the next. All you'll do if that happens is make training begin again.

 

The husky is known for their strong will and determination as you are quickly learning. The best advice I can offer is to determine a training method and stick to it. Consistency is the way to a long and happy life with huskies. That and never letting them see you sweat! LOL

 I unfortunately did not get a say in the dog that we picked. My fiance picked him and I am not going to give him back and choose another dog just because a husky is hard headed. Haha I myself am extremely hard headed. We just have to continue working with this little guy. I do not think that the humane society helped him with manners becuase they do not have enough staff or resources to train them or give each one individualized treatment. So we are trying our hardest now and I am sure with time it will pay off. Thanks for the adivce we will try all of it. He has sit figured out perfectly it is just the rest that is taking a lot of time so hopefully puppy classes will help.

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Although a husky breed may not have been the best choice for a first time dog for us, I also do not want to throw in the towel with him. This is why I came to the site to get advice for my puppy that will help him in the best possible way. However, I am wanting to know if others think that with time and patientince my fiance and I will be able to turn him into a great dog that listens or if starting with another dog would be better?

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Although a husky breed may not have been the best choice for a first time dog for us, I also do not want to throw in the towel with him. This is why I came to the site to get advice for my puppy that will help him in the best possible way. However, I am wanting to know if others think that with time and Patience my fiance and I will be able to turn him into a great dog that listens or if starting with another dog would be better?

Niko was my first dog, ever. I had seriously never owned one before him. With time, patience, and all the research I've put into the breed with my boyfriend we raised him to be very successful. He knows almost 40 commands and very, very rarely acts up and was raised around cats. He's almost a year old.
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You do realize you used two words that don't go together in the same sentence ...  "Husky" and "listen"

To put it simply, Huskies are too smart for their own good, they hear you and then they decide if they're going to do what you want or not.  I don't think anyone on here will disagree that as far as thinking dogs go - Husky's probably actually think more than any other breed.

If you want a dog who will sit when you say sit, come when you say come, lay down when you say down - consistently - then a Husky is not it!  They are definitely a breed all their own, and will give you so much pleasure that you'll wonder why you ever thought about another breed.

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Yeah I am slowly learning that those two things never go in the same sentence when it comes to a husky, but hopefully with time and patience it will get better. I just have to hope and put fourth all my effort as well as my fiance. Tonight we are going to sit down together and write out all the commands we want him to know and how to teach him those commands by using what you guys have said as well as the NILIF program, and in a week what puppy classes has taught us. He is already doing so well when it comes to his food bowl and us trying to get out the door. So that is a huge improvement!!!! It kind of makes me proud when he listens (like a mom teaching her son/daughter something). He is even really good when we put our hands in his food bowl and he eats out of our hands. :)

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