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Thinking about applying to rehome a Huksy....


pacific4130
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Hi,

As our Husky is getting older (he's 9 months) my partner and I have been thinking about getting another husky at some point in the near future. She'd really love another puppy (she would say that though as I'm the one at home doing all the hard work whereas she just gets puppy cuddles!) but I'd rather look into the option of rehoming an adult dog. I think it'd be a lot easier to put my energy into bringing an adult dog into the family rather than go through the puppy thing again. That was fun, but I'm in no hurry to repeat the experience! haha. Plus, there are some huskies out there desperately in need of a forever home before people go breeding any more....

I'd love to hear from anyone who has been through the rehoming process (ideally through SHCGB welfare, or SHWA) especially if you already had a dog prior to the rehoming.

  • How did you match up a dog to your current one? Younger/older? Same/different sex?
  • Did you contact the rehoming charity well in advance of wanting another husky? i.e. can you let them now it's something you'd like to do in the near future (say 3 - 6 months)?
  • Were they really inquisitive or judgemental?
  • Did you feel there was lots of support should things not work out?

Thanks in advance for any advice. I'd really love to give a dog a forever home, and give our pup a partner-in-crime, but I'd like to make sure I do it right first time.

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ok.

MY boy was about 9 months old. We saw Angels photo on the huskies in need website and fell in lovewith her.

She was brought to us for a visit and our homecheck was done at the same time.

Some rescues have different requirements for homechecks.

My two slotted together lovely from the beginning.

However. I have been trying to get a 3rd to fit into my pack and I cant manage it.

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ok.

MY boy was about 9 months old. We saw Angels photo on the huskies in need website and fell in lovewith her.

She was brought to us for a visit and our homecheck was done at the same time.

Some rescues have different requirements for homechecks.

My two slotted together lovely from the beginning.

However. I have been trying to get a 3rd to fit into my pack and I cant manage it.

The third is always tricky when you have a bonded pair. Sarah and I have had this conversation also. The new one ends up bonding with one of the two and it always seems like somebody is left out. It does get better though. After two years Jack is finally learning how to play, and at times he and Jessy are at each other's throats, literally...he can put her entire head in his mouth, but then she has the really high pitched scream that drives him insane. Then when they are both really tired, they lay together, resting on each other, and you can tell that they love each other. Andy, as pack alpha puffs every time Jessy comes around, and she latches on to his tail and makes him spin, but he only wants her to chase him! They figure it out, you do have to give it time though, and probably longer than you might originally feel comfortable with. Nobody had met Jessy when Jeff went to pick her up...and there was no turning back, so we make it work. She is our youngest and the troublemaker, and now spends her days crated, and the boys are free!

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Hi,

As our Husky is getting older (he's 9 months) my partner and I have been thinking about getting another husky at some point in the near future. She'd really love another puppy (she would say that though as I'm the one at home doing all the hard work whereas she just gets puppy cuddles!) but I'd rather look into the option of rehoming an adult dog. I think it'd be a lot easier to put my energy into bringing an adult dog into the family rather than go through the puppy thing again. That was fun, but I'm in no hurry to repeat the experience! haha. Plus, there are some huskies out there desperately in need of a forever home before people go breeding any more....

I'd love to hear from anyone who has been through the rehoming process (ideally through SHCGB welfare, or SHWA) especially if you already had a dog prior to the rehoming.

  • How did you match up a dog to your current one? Younger/older? Same/different sex?
  • Did you contact the rehoming charity well in advance of wanting another husky? i.e. can you let them now it's something you'd like to do in the near future (say 3 - 6 months)?
  • Were they really inquisitive or judgemental?
  • Did you feel there was lots of support should things not work out?

Thanks in advance for any advice. I'd really love to give a dog a forever home, and give our pup a partner-in-crime, but I'd like to make sure I do it right first time.

I can answer a few questions, but I only have the 1 dog...

And Thank You for considering to rehome! There are so many dogs out there, of many breeds, that need homes!

- I have no experience in the first question, but I would think it would be best to stagger the ages. That way, when they pass, it won't be much of a shock because you'd still have one to help you through the grieving process! But, you don't want to stagger the ages TOO much, otherwise the older one wouldn't be able to keep up with the younger one (ie: exercise wise) and eventually you'd might have to take 2 separate walks (a longer one for the younger, and a shorter one for the older).

As for the sexes...it depends on the dogs. Suka tends to be more 'pushy' towards male dogs, so if I were to ever get another dog while he was still here, I'd get a girl.

- For the 2nd question: No. Although, I did get Suka from a regular shelter and not a shelter specifically for huskies. I just walked in one day with my Mom, and saw Suka in the same kennel as the other dog I had wanted to adopt (he was adopted a few days prior.). I rushed home, researched the breed for a few days, and then I let the shelter know I was going to get him...I hoped they would "hold" him for me. Long story short, we met him and it worked out, so we snatched him up!

- 3rd question: Yes. The lady at the front desk, when I mentioned I wanted to adopt Suka, sorta looked at me with this critical eye. She gave me the whole spheel about how huskies can't be let off lead, how they have high prey drives, etc, etc. I told her I already knew all of that cause I spent some time researching the breed, but it still looked like she judged me. I understand why she did so, they adopt huskies only to have them brought back soon after cause of [commonly known breed trait].

- 4th question: No, I didn't feel like there was a lot of support. Maybe that's because it was a 'regular shelter'. I was VERY lucky in the fact I'd have gotten a well behaved and lazy husky! I also joined this forum, to boot, which helped me sort out some of his problems...

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My parents always rescued from dogs trust but they were saving lurchers.

Everytime there was a questionnaire to fill in this was just general questions about hours the dog would be alone where the dog would be kept and what you would do in certain situations (ie having a baby) they then have a meeting with you and ask the same sort of questions and tell you all the information about the dog you also get a chance to ask any other questions. Normally there is a small fee/donation to reserve the dog. They require every member of the family to meet the dog to make sure they get on. If there is a dog already in the family you can usually arrange to have a few meets to make sure. Then there is the home check this is usually to make sure the garden is secure and the fence is big enough. They may also ask more questions like where is the dog going to sleep and eat. After that you normally can arrange to make the final payment/donation and collect your new family member.

Dogs trust gave a collar, lead, dog bowls for food and water and about 1 weeks worth of food they are on so you can switch them slowly. But when we rescued Mollie from Cheltenham animal sanctuary none of that was included and they couldn't even tell us what food she was being given or how much or how often. So the advice and help you get all depends on the people from that particular rescue. :) hope all goes well for you in your search

Edited by Thistle
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We found a husky that we rather liked at a local RSPCA but failed due to having a female sibe who was 'complete'. She was roughly 12 months at the time and there was no way we were going to get her 'done' that young. We have since rehomed (but not rescued as such) a Mal and another sibe

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We've no direct experience of rehoming but we were recently offered another female that was in need of a new home, we had to decline as we're in no position to take on anymore and most certainly no more females. We have managed to find a suitable person who is interested and we've offered our support with any adjustment.

Similar to you, we've decided in the event we lose Safi we would prefer to rehome rather than invest in another puppy

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Or maybe try to rehome a pup? 'I have a pup but I'm now pregnant so the pup has to go etc' (ignoring the irresponsibility angle) this means an unwanted pup could find a new home without pandering to backyard breeders and the new owner gets to bring them up from puppy stage

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[MENTION=5918]Molly's_Dad[/MENTION]

Hmm... Trouble is that anyone who is in that situation and is passing the pup on, as opposed to the pup returning to the breeder, probably sourced the pup from a BYB. I know that when I got my pup it was in the contract that I couldn't re-home him myself - he had to go back to the breeder for them to find a suitable home. I wouldn't class myself as an experienced husky owner but I'm guessing all the ethical breeders would work on those same lines. I'm not experienced in the whole of husky breeding so I may be completely wrong.

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I do homechecks for various rescues (not only huskies) and we have passed a homecheck for SHCGB so are members there too. All the rescues I homecheck for have various questionnaires but the main topics are how long a dog would be left on it's own, what is the garden like, any resident animals - if so, what? how would you introduce a new dog to other pets / family members / children? Just talking with them gives away a lot more than just filling in a questionnaire, you get a much better feel chatting in general.

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