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Sarah

Huskies Off Lead

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oh and @spiritualearthangel . WELCOME to husky owners! I myself don't have a husky, but thats a long (and happy) story. I stick around because even without a husky, this forum is amazing :D

:welcome:

Don't think I didn't notice your only 1 post :P

That's cos ive been chasing luna round the park for the whole day and not had time to go on here after registering lol..:kimba2:

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I purchased a couple of husky books before getting Zeus as i was aware of the commitment required and they state 'NEVER' to let them off their leads because once they get running they could of run 20 miles before they even realise youre no behind them. My friend who breeds them who i got Zeus off also warned me never to let them off either as he'd experienced it first hand..chasing his in a car at 30 mph for about 5 mile before he caught him :D As i believe their instinct to run is built into them and can never be truly trained out of them. I would also be too frightened of him being run over as well because their friendly and inquisitive nature dictates that they run to someone across a road to say hello without thinking.

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I'm a bit on the fence here. Glala is definitely a no. Dana can go offlead, which I did on several occasions (to let her swim in a lake and a few times on the beach to let her run). She usually comes when called, but even better: She doesn't run away. Though now I have two 30 feet leads so whenever I want to give them more room to run (or swim) I use these now. 30f is more than enough, they don't wander too far away from me.

We don't have any enclosed dog parks. But both have no problems with other dogs, and avoid them when they don't like them. I think I'll have them offlead in there if we had anything like that.

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Voted. Only in an enclosed area. We are fortunate to have a fenced back yard (garden as it's called by some) that is about an acre in size.

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Voted - despite not having a dog yet.

I picked enclosed areas but really it is going to depend on the dog. Since I plan to put serious training into my husky - I want to do Obedience - I'm hoping to have some recall at least. I think it'll depend on the distractions and if there's more value for me over the distractions. I intend to build high, high value for sticking around me or coming to me when I call instead of the "stupid" distractions. But, it's a husky, so we'll see. :D

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husky - I want to do Obedience

Those words don't like to be in the same sentence, unless they have the operator "not" :P

Though, it does depend on the dog and the trainer!

Trey.

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Yuri is only 1/4 sibe and I judge it off his behavior. I do let Yuri off lead but only if there are not many people around or if there is a group of dogs I'm walking with. I can trust him to always come back even if he does disapear into a bush for a few seconds he is 1/2 border collie which is a very obediant breed if the training is put in. I did a lot of recall practice with Yuri on a long line before I even contimplated letting him off.

As for Aya, no, I will never let her off lead unless it's in an enclosed dog park and as we don't have one, she won't ever be going off lead. I got the lead pulled out of my hand a week before I moved house so I guess about 3 weeks ago now. Aya took Yuri (they were attached) and did a runner, I got a call and they had been running around the race track at the sports center. I got a walking belt shortly after that as I don't want it ever happening again.

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Ok - it's been suggested to set up a thread so we can see the percentage of husky owners here who let their dogs off lead.

I've created the poll - please take a moment to vote on it - all votes are anonymous and you can chose more than one.

I never allow ours offlead unless he's in the house, or in an enclosed area, supervised in case he try's to make his alcatraz escape-he means too much to us to risk it whether its right or wrong, we just aren't willing to put him at risk and lose our beloved, just isn't worth it to us. To give you a story which reinforced our decision on this, our bank teller at the banks drive-through commented on our Husky pup who was riding with us, and she said "thanks, it did me good to see another Husky, makes me feel a bit better", she then proceeded to inform us that she recently lost her Husky of 9 years because they for some reason let it off-lead, and even though it was recall trained, it ran off and been gone for 6 weeks at the time, she was very heartbroken:(

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I'd vote no, but thats because I have no husky, so I didn't vote.

But as others have said, it depends on the dog and situation, of course I would let other breeds (if mature and trained enough!!) off leash, but a husky would take a lot more consideration...

I'd only let a really really (REALLY) well trained dog out unsupervised, I've lost all to many that way :(

Trey.

All my Heelers have been great off-leash, but they aren't Husky's, either.

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All my Heelers have been great off-leash, but they aren't Husky's, either.

Yeah, I would let most dogs off-leash... but thats just not the nature of this breed

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I will let Grey off in the woods when we are with Kita, Kita has impeccable recall (part Northern Inuit) and Grey is very attached to her, she's his girlfriend lol. He has fairly good recall in general, I know Mary and Tony used to let him off at the beach.

Grey is the only one I would let off, I dont completely trust him, but the area is away from roads, and theres too many interesting smells for him to wander far, and the river distracts him too.

The girls, only in the dog park

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I will let Grey off in the woods when we are with Kita, Kita has impeccable recall (part Northern Inuit) and Grey is very attached to her, she's his girlfriend lol. He has fairly good recall in general, I know Mary and Tony used to let him off at the beach.

Grey is the only one I would let off, I dont completely trust him, but the area is away from roads, and theres too many interesting smells for him to wander far, and the river distracts him too.

The girls, only in the dog park

Thats a great way to train a dog-use another who listens well!

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My dogs are only let off leash when I KNOW that their recall is totally reliable.

:)

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Even in an enclosed area, I still expect my dogs to have reliable recall. Things can still happen in an enclosed area where you would need to recall your dog - someone leaves a gate open, you need to get your dog away from something dangerous like an aggressive dog or crazy person or something they shouldn't be eating.

So for me, unless I KNOW my dogs are reliable under all distractions the leash does not come off.

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Those words don't like to be in the same sentence, unless they have the operator "not" :P

Though, it does depend on the dog and the trainer!

Trey.

:P

That's why I'm doing tons of training research, joined up with a training program and buying all the DVD's I can. I have seen huskies do Obedience so it can be done. They've also done agility, too and I'm thinking of that as well. I just want to do something other than sledding and sledding related stuff even though I also will try that, too.

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:P

That's why I'm doing tons of training research, joined up with a training program and buying all the DVD's I can. I have seen huskies do Obedience so it can be done. They've also done agility, too and I'm thinking of that as well. I just want to do something other than sledding and sledding related stuff even though I also will try that, too.

Looks like you've got you're work cut out for you!

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There is absolutely no reason why a Sibe can't train and compete in dog sports like agility and obedience :)

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There is absolutely no reason why a Sibe can't train and compete in dog sports like agility and obedience :)

Not saying there is, but as we all know Sibes are quite indiependent thinkers. It'll be a challenge, and I don't believe they could ever be as reliable as a BC, or other dogs that are bred for other types of work. But they can still do it, and it's not as paradoxial as I might make it sound, they're just not (NOT) likely (at all) to win a championship (Though I'm sure thats not what @Laine is planning on, agility isn't about winning, but having fun)

I do look forward to seeing how things go for you though!

Trey

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Not saying there is, but as we all know Sibes are quite indiependent thinkers. It'll be a challenge, and I don't believe they could ever be as reliable as a BC, or other dogs that are bred for other types of work. But they can still do it, and it's not as paradoxial as I might make it sound, they're just not (NOT) likely (at all) to win a championship (Though I'm sure thats not what @Laine is planning on, agility isn't about winning, but having fun)

Maybe, maybe not. It really depends on the dog, the handler and the training method used. I was told the same thing about my beagle (along with 'why would you bother') but she's beaten BCs, labs and GSDs in the obedience ring. Training an 'unusual' breed can be harder work than a more naturally biddable breed but you can still have success, some Sibes have quite decent food and prey drive which gives the handler a lot to work with if they know how to harness it.

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I've seen some videos of Sibes in agility ( I think ) and they did well. I can also imagine the amount of time that they and their handler have to put in to make it happen!

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Only in enclosed areas we have trouble getting her to come back in our backyard so Bella will never be allowed offlead in somewere she can enscape from

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@Trey - yeah, I know; looking forward to it, too :D

I've been looking into a lot of trainer's methods. I've joined Puppy Peaks - Susan Garrett's program that looks into how she trained her new puppy Swagger - and I've ordered a book and DVD as well. I also plan to order a couple of Michael Ellis DVD's too mainly the tug and food DVD's he's got available through Leerburg. Both use Operant Conditioning for training though Michael trains Protection sport dogs mostly, and Susan Agility; they both have ideas and methods I like. It'll also depend on the dog, too, which I know. Which is why I'm going to volunteer at the SPCA to get more aquainted to dog personalities I otherwise wouldn't and maybe talk to how they handle the dogs there, and if they have a trainer definitely talk to them.

Nah, I don't expect to really go anywhere agility wise, it's more so for the fun. But still, you never know. I'll see how high I can go anyway.

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