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Huskies Off Lead

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I've always let her off lead in isolated areas so say for instance along a huge stretch of beach where there's no one else or like you said in an enclosed play ground. It's never any where too confined that's over populated, I make a calculated decision when I decide to take her off leash.

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I vote yes I have two huskys which are both golden off the lead and come straight back within the first click of my fingers :)

I vote yes I have two huskys which are both golden off the lead and come straight back within the first click of my fingers :)

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Both of mine had/have excellent recall, however they were/are always on the lead for their walks as good as they were/are hunting instinct will always win.. It's why I made sure our house had a huge garden so they can run safely. i personally would not risk their safety for anything ever!

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I vote no except in some circumstances.  I have 10 acres and she LOVES TO RUN. She is supervised at all times. We never let her out of our sight.  She is a great dog and has been trained very well.  That being said, there is always that 1% of time that she may not listen.  She is 10 years old and has slowed down a bit and do mean only a bit.  She loves to stretch out and run.  So she gets to do that on occasion.  Mostly she is leashed and especially if we go anywhere.  Camping, another one of her loves. 

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I let my girl off lead often.

 

When she's not off lead she's on a 50ft lead- not a flexi. I always loved the feel of manipulating a long lead manually. It makes you very intimate with your dog. Being able to control and direct her with vocal cues, at that distance on a daily bases and in daily life routines, it really does help both you and the dog grow in confidence together.

 

We go to the dog park on Sundays- no lead obviously.

 

I take her to Mohawk Park which is only a 10minute walk from our home and let her off lead there. This is basically our communities social park- picnic, frisbee golf, lake access, kids squirt pad, soccer field, and some trail access. There is always other people, kids, and dogs there no matter the time of year. At peak season/times you'll find it gets crowded with all sorts of people/clubs/animals.

 

I trained Dakota at Mohawk Park for the most part. It's was the perfect place for allot of our off lead training. It backs up onto a lake and some semi-fenced in so it's semi-contained. You'll find so many various distractions you can work to overcome. It beats the dog park for variety of exposures while off-lead training, hands down.

 

At the dog park you train them for one thing, obedience around dogs and only dogs in a very specific setting. At a populated park you’re training for people, kids, dogs, cats, birds, squirrels, deer, food, physical hazards, bikers, skaters, cars, and all in a variety of settings. It’s a far more realistic setting for dealing with situations you would find yourself in given an unleashed dog.

 

And of course the minute we get onto a trail, I put her pack on her, instruct her to follow, and then go on my way without putting on a leash.  She has walked nearly the entire Bruce Trail (500miles), with no lead, nor even a minor incident.

 

Although that's not to say I didn't find myself in some situations while training her along the way.

 

The first winter we had together, she ran out onto a frozen lake and almost gave me a heart attack. We normally go swimming there in the summer and I hadn't trained her to stay off it in the winter so she didn't know any better- she wasn't aware of the possibly that she could fall through the ice. Luckily I recalled her quickly and we escaped with only a couple cracking sounds that were felt down to the bone.

 

Also once at the beginning of her training I got sloppy. It was early winter and the park was near to empty. I broke out my camera and was snapping photos. I didn't see it but she did- there was a dog way off in the distance. She went bolting after it. It turned out to be someone we knew so there wasn't an incident.

 

Over-all I have to say, training off leash work with Dakota has been immensely rewarding. 90% pain 10% pure ecstasy- worth it beyond measure.

 

The only thing I don't do with Dakota is let her off lead in a situation where we’re not actively doing something. When I don’t otherwise direct her or something hasn't otherwise been trained, she will go and do whatever she wants, which includes wondering off and exploring the great outdoors- still a husky. Hiking for example, rarely with a lead, but camping at the end of the day, she's always on a lead.

 

I highly recommend training the recall vocally, but in addition to that, use a whistle just in case they do ever wonder off- always a possibility no matter the breed or dog. With a whistle, you're at least given a mile or two of sound travel. You’re also far less likely to abuse the recall and devalue the command.

 

p.s. Sometimes when I look at her, I'm reminded of Dory from finding Nemo "just keep swimming, just keep swimming, swimming, swimming."

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That's a lovely post but I think you'll find most huskies would not respond like that and most members here would not risk letting their huskies off lead 

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Never off lead except if IN a secure field or park and HIGH fences incl gate! My Chester can clear 4 feet from a standing bound. I've never encouraged him to jump high over much because he'd probably clear our 6ft fences, easy! Yep - he's good on recall - when it suits. Another playmate? Then he and they are deaf! No recall. He comes bk when it suits.

Eski is unknown and on the only one (so far) time she got out...she ran around all excited but did not come on call (she'd only been with me two weeks mind).

Fortunately a woman and kid were walking towards us - I think it reminded Eski of her former 'carer' and kid and I quickly asked the woman to call her and grab her collar (saying also she was friendly). She did thank god - my heart resumed beating. Whew!

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That's a lovely post but I think you'll find most huskies would not respond like that and most members here would not risk letting their huskies off lead 

Most wouldn't and probably shouldn’t- fully agree. We all know the stories of dogs breaking loose while sledding and running off. However, there is also the rare story of them stopping and coming back having noticed their livelihood wasn't in toe behind them. This just goes to show that the breed is capable of possessing both traits. If you're the right person with the right dog, it's completely doable- pick your pup and train it wisely.

 

Huskies have very strong working ethics and if you can tap into that you can train them to do just about anything.

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I'm interested in the strong 'working ethics' term.

Do please explain. If I can begin to understand then I might crack their 'code' and make life even better for all of us!

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I'm interested in the strong 'working ethics' term.

Do please explain. If I can begin to understand then I might crack their 'code' and make life even better for all of us!

Owning a husky is like training a professional athlete who is also a mini Einstein- they need to be engaged and they not only "want" to work, but "NEED" to work- less they lose their sanity.

 

You've seen your dog focused, you know its dam well smart, you know their determination.

 

Those are the ultimate working ethics you could ever hope to have...

 

My advice for getting through to a husky is doing things that are engaging to them while always keeping everything controlled and constructive. Stop all undesirables before they happen, at least until they know what is and is not allowed. Then gradually give and take away the freedom to choose depending on which choices they make (letting them make choices I found was a big step in improving). Keep progressing for the lifetime of the dog. Everything is ALWAYS a training exercise.

 

Sitting around the house asking for commands and shoving cookies in their mouths does not count towards engaging them- do this and you get what? Maybe 5-20minutes of training? Half of that being lackluster as they lose interest? I haven’t found huskies to have short attention spans- they just have zero interest in what you're doing.

 

My girl will spend hours upon hours hunting for the chipmunk that got away.

 

In my experience, anything less than 2+ hours accomplishes very little and she only shows improvements when being taught in combination with a fun activity- something to cancel out the fact that we’re doing other things, things that are not so fun like obedience training. Near to all of the training I do with Dakota has taken place on streets, in parks, or on trails. The longer and harder we work on perfecting a particular cue or behavior the stronger it becomes- always continue improving and refining.

 

When we did the Bruce Trail... That was 36 days of constant off lead training, our crown jewel thus far in terms of accomplishments. She wore a backpack with her food rations in it and was instructed to follow as we had been practicing for months prior- this is the work ethic that I spoke about - backpack + follow to her means one thing and one thing only- it's not play time, hunting season, or exploratory mode- it's work mode- competitive sled dogs do the same thing.

 

She becomes as focused on doing her job as she would be on the chipmunk that got away.

 

The biggest problem I think most people have is that they give up and/or get frustrated. I remember the first week I got Dakota and was walking her through a park. There was another husky owner there. I asked the lady how you train them to stop pulling (my shoulder muscles were bruised)... she said you don't- they're huskies- it's what they do.

 

That statement by her just about dictates the direction of every conversation I’ve ever had with another husky owner…

 

p.s. I'm not advocating people start letting their huskies off lead- DON’T - you'll regret it. Rather, I’m advocating that you never give in to a stereotype and always keep trying in spite of the fact you very well may never succeed. I'd have spent her entire life trying to teach her to walk on a loose leash even if in the end it wasn't achievable.

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That is very profound. And enlightening. I've read only to keep training to short periods which, to me, barely gives time for 'habit" or muscle memory (including brain power) - become 'established.

I'm not athletically empowered as I used to be. I really enjoy watching and getting my boy to see and absorb new sights and sounds - he's quite timid at new things and just sitting outside Costa has him now used to wheelchairs, buggies, toddlers (he literally barked in fear at his first; the Mum was good and thought it funny. She let me let Chester have a sniff and once he recognised a human connection but a small one he never flinched or backed off again.

The delivery man carrying a sheep over his shoulder with neck bobbing made him dive under my chair! The smell got the better of him to come out but he preferred to stay by me. I didn't over fuss, just said 'down boy....stay' which he did. Same with someone with a backpack or an open umbrella! He's not overly impulsive to go look...if I ignore what causes concern then he picks up that I'm not concerned and relaxes.

If people want to come pet him (he is beautiful - thry both are) he has to sit; I ask them to not pat on top of head but to come alongside to stroke side of ear base or scratch neck.

Reading his body language is an always interesting and ongoing learning curve.

My girl is quick to howl or bark at something she's unsure of and, is used to children and dogs altho' both keen to go meet and greet, they are rather off-putting to other dog owners (and their dogs) given their size!

I avoid dogs that have a challenging stance when they see me.

(Before Eski came)......

Met an Akita owner with another Jap dog - both big; owner didn't have much control but asked if we could let dogs meet.

First time I've seen Chester's hackles go up and...he put himself in front of me but kept close in protection position.

The Akita was not friendly and there was no 'stand down' altho the Japanese dog did wag tail albeit shyly.

Not impressed. Have seen another huge Malamute muzzled on walks - rescued - and not keen on other dogs; growling and lunging.

Another Akita I really fear - he's all mixed up - protective of his mistress but bored witless with no regular walks, or training (except by phone and fear tactics with a belt threatened!) It doesn't help with incessant yapping from an overweight schnauzer - I got her sorted in five mins with firm voice sit! & immediate reward. Three more goes and she went off to sleep on the sofa. I was fast onto her again when she was about to start yapping - she settled.

The Akita really scared me - that look of intent...he's bitten visitors - the woman hasn't a clue and I fear he will one day kill her - she won't listen.

My 75 yr old friend (vet's widow) can handle him - he listens and obeys but she knows him and he her. Not me. The owner just doesn't realise or seems to want to the time bomb in her home.

Thank you...I'll be investing in backpacks for them as carrying even a couple of water bottles & and food/ treats each will make them 'work out' some more switch to work mode.

My vets complimented me on their condition and response to my commands and that they accept being examined head to tail quietly with no aggression at all. (Most others are muzzled by the vet).

I say 'wait' and they stand still or sit. I reassure and praise as each one gets checked; the other is in down position.

And yes..they ASK to do stuff ie obedience stuff (for treats) as I don't just hand them out at home.

He will sit and bark (saying please) w/o prompting; however, I get him to do what I want not what he thinks I want. She's learning this too.

The garden is awful as they've churned it up in to mud through play, running round and round. I pick up regularly.

I want a proper run with concrete and outdoor refuge but it's taking time as we are catching up on 8 years from an IVA.

Home improvements are long overdue.

My health's been lousy re creeping anaemia over 18 months, (found last Sep hospitalisation after a gallstone attack). Then too many tests and three months on iron has done wonders - & I was bk out building up walking/training on two dog gangline lead in prep for dryland rig pulling. Hitting 4 miles.

Court costs as a fact witness has delayed me yet again to order my rig as I've not been repaid since Nov....then hit by Shingles on right leg two weeks ago - couldn't walk out.

On the mend. I'm not a quitter and bloody stubborn but..patient in achieving the right result. If my dogs don't get it right - my bad - so I go back to basics.

Chester so NEEDS to want to learn...it's inspiring.

Eski has a more laid bk way but, she's sharpening up, altho a bit lazy. We're getting there.

They have a fb page with some of his/ their early training demos - Chester and Eski Cottee - any comments welcomed. I'll put some more on soon. 691972764eab1fa05a3e2fd572ba59f0.jpgdfdf042f0553bb95458c225896b36a5d.jpg004f851bdc5a9f74736611f5330ee956.jpg58d8ca1699356e091dc2cadc6f1f0345.jpg

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Yeah they pull but should when required. I work on short lead too but I'll be working on them to also walk behind me when I have backpacks and can certainly start them towards this - new goal. Nothing more wonderful than to have big happy obedient dogs with you.

Thx again.

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Two dogs are more challenging...they do not like being apart now - since Eski came Sep last.

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He's 39.8kg. She's gained 8+kg since the last photo here now at 29.9 kg.

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That is very profound. And enlightening. I've read only to keep training to short periods which, to me, barely gives time for 'habit" or muscle memory (including brain power)

Don't get me wrong, short training periods have a place.

 

I find such things to be best utilized learning new cues. You can't just toss your guys into a month long hike practicing a follow command. That's going to be far to stressful and slow the dogs learning curve- quite possibly making the command a very unpleasant activity and reduce the dogs trust in your leadership.

 

New ques should be introduced slowly and gradually.

 

The thing is, the more words you teach your dog, the more variety is introduced into their lives, the more training transforms into a lifestyle and continuous activity. You begin to engage your dogs mind more and more. They learn faster and faster. They begin paying more and more attention. They understand what is expected of them. But for that to happen they have to know the right way of doing things and what that earns them and the wrong way of doing things and also what that earns them.

 

And a dog that knows it's place in the pack, one that understands it's roll and what it's supposed to be doing, that is a dog who is all the happier because of it. A well trained dog is a dog that gets to go more places and is appreciated by more people. It makes them feel good and secure in any environment.

 

Training your husky will snowball. When you mix in behavior modifications, teaching things like not running through doors, not pulling during walks, jumping up on people, being hyper indoors, digging in gardens, the continuous introduction of new commands by way of short 5-20min training sessions, the continued proofing of previously learned commands like heel, wait, stay, place, with increasing long durations, the ever evolving trust in the relationship... before you know it life 'short training sessions' are simply a way of life for you dog.

 

Eventually though, you do have to take a leap of faith and push past an obedience break down. Every cue should be proofed in a situation beyond what you would typically expect from them. How often would you put your dog into a 3hour wait cue? In real life, never. In training, I've done it three times. Once with the front door at my house. Once with an open car door at the dog park. And once at the front door to my grandparents home out in the country.

 

Crawl before you walk. Walk before you run. Run before you Hike.

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Absolutely and yes..no treats without earning it.

When I've been out a while they both greet with singing and when I go into the kitchen and say hello with a rub, scratch necks and real hugs incl verbal greeting they both go into 'tricks' like 'woof!' for please, spinning right then left; they'll both sit and lift a paw to my leg or place onto a lifted knee (mine). They are so affectionate and pleased to see me..I'm very touched and humbled at their actions!

How to stop digging in the garden? Help! It's Eski not Chester..He doesn't!

I'm seriously going to fence off the larger area and create a long 75' x 14' area in gravel / concrete wirh a dbl kennel.and then get my lawn back! It's down to horrid mud and very patchy.

The drizzly uk weather and light snow fall or heavy frost has created soggy ground with principally thin top soil and clay!

Money is the challenge - not cheap but it will get done.

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i always used to let my dogs offlead.. i remember when leeli was younger she was always offlead and stayed with us no matter what. i used to think 'why dont people let their huskies offlead?!' and then ofcourse came the day where she ran like a lunatic and it took us two hours to get her back. we kept letting her offlead until it became a bit worrying about her safety. we got brian and he had brilliant recall... until he sees a dog that is and nothing brings him back. harlie comes back if we have a ball she loves it to death. but over the past month ive been looking at HO and decided to never let them offlead again (we used to allow them all off lead in a local field) but i got thinking, not only should we worry about their safety but with the new uk dog laws what if brian (who is dog agressive) tries to bite a dog and the owner gets in the way? or even harlie tries to bite a dog? we've grown up since getting leeli and now we will never let them offlead unless its enclosed . and there are NO enclosed areas by us at all :( if we go to my parents they have a park nearby which has an enclosed kids area which we let them off in if there are no kids. but even that kids area has low fences so i stand there worried thinking they might jump over! i love seeing them run but as its their own safety i feel i have to keep them on lead. :( we've been lucky to never have our dogs get hit by a car or bite anyone or bite another dog... but you never know when the time will come and it could come. leeli and brian escaped the back garden while i was watching them (ran between my legs) and they almost got hit by a car. i was literally screeching after them and almost crying. thankfully a lady stopped and helped me get them! its all such a complicated issue but i believe for the safety of my dogs that i shouldnt allow them offlead. :( 

oh but me and my fiance are thinking about setting up a pettition or donations to build some doggy enclosed parks?! i would love to have that and not have to worry. and it could also help socialise brian and harlie! dont know where to start though :P

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That's a fab idea and we could certainly benefit with an enclosed safe area to run our dogs in Tewkesbury.

I wouldn't even mind paying a small amount a month to go towards maintaining it.

There is one on a water sport centre ground near us but ONLY for dog owners who are using the facilities and/or camping there so I can't use it.

Pick up bags and bin are right by the gate entrance too but, the amount of dog poop I found was discouraging.

I was sometimes picking up somebody else's dog poop which really riled me and then when somebody made a complaint that I was giving my Chester a run...I was asked not to come any more despite my only coming when it was empty or putting him back on lead if someone showed up.

I love watching them run flat out, it really let's them stretch their legs out to full potential.

Maybe getting a petition together but, also asking round local landowners who would like to help create a safe enclosed field and get the council to put a bin and bag supply.

Anyone not picking up after their dogs can be reported and maybe their registration nmbr taken then banned for a month with the list of offenders on the gate.

The new dog laws have made it difficult to actually really let a dog run and run and I believe putting in enclosed safe dog areas would really help.

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yes i rang my county council up and they thought it was quite a good idea!! i am yet to ring my council up though just to see how i can start it up?

even if its just one per town it would still be brilliant because its good for the dogs knowing they are safe and also good for socialising !

yes deffo everyone needs to clean their poo up -_-

our nearest park has so much on it i'm thinking about cleaning it up myself!

i was thinking maybe if it was council or public then theres not any tiny things to think about like liability for what not and things like that?

i realllllllly badly want an enclosed area for my babies to run about in.

we have one nearby but you have to pay 10 pound for 1 hour which we cant afford to do so :/

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Good god £10 for one hour, that is ridiculous if you lived near us you could use our garden for the fee of a rodeo dog treat xxx

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 lmao i wish!! its terrible isnt it?

just want to be able to let them off without worry of them running :(!!

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We are lucky now we have a big garden now, they tend to circle the same bush at 90 miles an hour lol

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lmao!!! that must be lovely :D

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They love it we are lucky as our house is rented and the land lady does it have an issue, even let us get a little one...don't think the beige carpet likes it lol

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They love it we are lucky as our house is rented and the land lady does it have an issue, even let us get a little one...don't think the beige carpet likes it lol

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wow thats brilliant! i never thought any landlord would ever allow a puppy :D 

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