Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
HuskyCouture

...is it bad?

Recommended Posts

so i feed embry taste of the wild, and i don't want him getting bored with it so every month we switch off between wetlands and high prairie. is it bad to being doing this? i've been doing it for about 4 months and it hasn't changed his stool or anything so i haven't been considered. but yeah just wondering if there are any negative effects to this, thannnks :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this http://www.infopet.co.uk/pages/0131.html which is insteresting reading

And also this:

Dogs act like they have have the mythical "cast-iron stomach" most times, eating objects and substances that make us shudder in disgust. And while it's true that dogs can consume these things blithely, it's also true that a sudden change of a dog's primary diet can be hard on both their stomachs and their eating habits. Changing the main ingredient of your dog's diet (eg: brand of dry dog food) should be done gradually and over a period of at least four days (preferably longer).

How gradual is gradual?

On the first day of change, you should have plenty of the old dog food left. Add three quarters of their old food, and one quarter of the new food. You should do this for at least two days. After two days or so, add in another quarter, so you have half old food, half new food. Again, keep it at this level for another two days or so. Then add in a third quarter (one quarter old, three quarters new), and finally you can phase out the old food completely.

What happens if you don't do it gradually?

Stomach Cramps

Heartburn

Indigestion

Diarrhea

Vomitting

Refusal to Eat

On Presenting Your Dog With a Menu of Many Choices

I'm not talking about raw feeding here, and I'm not discussing home-cooked meals. This refers to a habit some dog owners have developed of having an array of dry dog food choices, or of buying whatever is on sale that week to the feed the dog and save money. Here's a little tip: It may save you a few dollars, and it may be convenient for you, but you are hurting your dog. Chronic indigestion, finicky eating habits, and chronic diarrhea are just three common things that will happen if you like to switch your dog's foods constantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great reply dani +1

i swap the flavours but not the brand - could you try that jennet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We alternate between flavors of TOTW with Zoya. No ill-effects whatsoever. I spoke with a sales rep from TOTW on this subject and he told me that many do this with the Wetlands and High Prairie formulas. We simply end one bag, and start in fresh on the next bag. The formulas are very closely matched, so there should be no problem is making a direct switch between.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 we swap flavours but stay within the same brand. . . Autarky.

This is the only kibble that doesn't give at least one of our 3 the runs. biggrin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great reply dani +1

i swap the flavours but not the brand - could you try that jennet?

that's what i am doing lol, the wet lands is the duck flavor and the high prairie is the venison and bison

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think sarah meant the same brand but a different flavour

Nix I agree with you. That is what Sarah meant, and that's exactly what Jennet is doing. Wetlands and High Prairie are two of the three flavors of Taste of the Wild, which of course is the brand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've switched from Orijen to Acana and back to Orijen with THK thrown in there a couple times a week and I'm thinking of trying TOTW too. I've seen no ill effects on Siku from switching her food, even when I switched her off of purina puppy chow to Orijen when I first got her.

Here's some good info:

Change your dog’s food

Once you have selected a good quality dog food, that’s all you need to feed, right? Not really. You should vary your dog’s food periodically. There are many good reasons for this:

_ Dogs (actually all mammals) are designed to consume a range of different foods, and to obtain differing vitamins and minerals from each. They are not designed to eat “only chicken†or “only lamb†or any other food item for eternity. Changing foods, importantly the contents of those foods, every so often helps to give them the variety their bodies were designed to thrive on.

_ There is no one dog food in existence that “has it allâ€Â. And remember, the feeding trials that foods go through only last for six months (and not all foods are even trialled). Changing foods periodically helps to ensure that no dietary deficiencies or excesses build up over time.

_ Variety is the spice of life. Who wants to eat the same food day in and day out? Could you do it? For months or years? Feeding your dog something different helps to ensure that he does not become bored and frustrated with his food. This will not make your dog picky - we are talking about periodic changes here, not serving up something different or adding goodies to tempt him every time he doesn’t like his dinner.

And most importantly of all:

_ It helps to avoid the development of allergies. In a few extreme cases, you (or your dog) may be instantly and violently allergic to something. But that is a few extreme cases only - the vast majority of allergies are things that build up over time and with constant exposure. The surest way to develop an allergy to chicken, for example, is to consume it daily for an extended period. It is no coincidence that the most common allergens are things that have commonly been used in dog foods for many years. The (modern) advice given by nutritionists is that feeding a wide variety of different foods, preferably from a young age, can help to avoid the development of allergies in the first place (that's the advice given for humans too).

Common signs of allergies are itchy skin, red itchy paws, chewing paws, yeast infections, ear infections, and skin infections that may respond to antibiotics but reappear as soon as the antibiotics are discontinued.

That all adds up to changing the food you feed every once in a while. That means changing to a food with different main ingredients. There is very little benefit to switching from one chicken/rice food to another, for example. If you have been feeding a food with chicken as the main ingredient, then it is far better that the next food is based on lamb, or turkey, or fish, or beef, etc and that the other main ingredients are also varied.

Do I have to change brands every time I change food?

No, not necessarily. Look at the ingredients in the different formulas made by your brand. What is different? If it is only the main meat ingredient, then you should change to a different brand when you change foods. If many of the ingredients, including the main meat, are different then there is no need to change brands if you don’t want to. The point here is to ensure that your dog gets a good variety of different food items in his diet. Not brand loyalty.

How often should I rotate foods?

Minimally, at least every three months. But you can change more frequently than that. If your dog does not suffer from digestive upsets when his food is changed, then you might even consider changing foods every time the bag runs out.

How many different foods do I need? Can I use a food again?

At least three or four different foods (different main meat source and different main ingredients). More is better. You can certainly reuse a good food though, especially if your dog does particularly well on it. You could choose, for example, to feed food A for one bag then change to food B – go back to food A, then to food C and so on. This satisfies the criteria of avoiding constant or prolonged exposure to a particular set of ingredients.

What about just mixing foods together?

Mixing foods together can certainly help to ensure nutritional adequacy for the long term. But it does nothing to provide your dog with variety (something different to eat!) and it does not satisfy the criteria of avoiding constant or prolonged exposure to a particular set of ingredients. So this practice will do nothing to help avoid the development of food allergies – it just means that there are a greater number of things the dog is being exposed to on a constant basis. It also means that there is a wider range of possible culprits should a food allergy develop. You can mix foods if you choose, but you should vary the foods that you mix together, just as if you were feeding a single food.

Do I need to change the food gradually?

It is usually wise to effect a change gradually. Not every dog is sensitive to food changes, and many will handle cold turkey changes without issue. But many won’t, and the upset tummies and loose stools that can come with changing foods too fast are such an annoyance (for the dog too!) that it makes sense just to change gradually, unless you know for certain that your dog has the sort of cast iron stomach that won’t be upset by a sudden change.

The simplest way to change foods is to blend the old and new foods together for a week or so. Start with a mix that is 25% new food and 75% old. Feed that for two or three days, and if there are no upset tummies or loose stools, increase the blend to a 50/50 mix. Again, feed that for a couple of days, then increase to a 75/25 blend, and finally to 100% new food. If at any stage there is a tummy upset or the dog’s stools become loose, then hold off on increasing the amount of new food in the blend until that problem resolves. If there are no problems at all, it will take a week to ten days to accomplish the switch.

Won’t changing foods make my dog picky?

No, it won’t. It’s more likely to have the opposite effect, and keep the dog interested in his food. How long could you stay interested in eating exactly the same thing? A food change once a month, or every two or three months is not going to give you a picky dog. What creates pickiness is serving up something different any time the dog shows no interest in his meal. Just like little kids, a dog will learn very quickly that refusing to eat a meal results in Mom producing something better – if you constantly produce something better. Instead, you should give the dog his food at set meal times, and pick it up if it is not eaten within about 20 minutes. Don’t offer anything else (i.e. don’t fill him up on treats) until the next meal time.

Are there any other benefits to changing foods?

YES! Changing foods every so often means that you keep yourself aware of what is available. Dog food is not a static science and it is very pleasing to be able to note that constant improvements are being made. Foods that may have once been amongst the best available are constantly being surpassed (this is a good thing! Dog food has not historically been a high quality product).

We’ve all met people who swear “brand x†is the best you can get – and have been feeding it for the last 15 years, completely unaware of advances that have been made. Well, that may have been true 15 years ago, but now “brand x†may be one of the lower quality foods available (though it’s unlikely to be reflected in cost).

We fully expect the foods we currently recommend here to be surpassed or improved in the coming years. This is good news for you and your dog. Don’t fall into the trap of assuming that what is the best available now will always be the best you can get. It won’t be (or at least, we sincerely hope that it won’t be).

From www.dogfoodanalysis.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's OK. There's stuff in the US that we don't get that you do get in the UK, so it goes both ways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the dog has already previously been switched and adjusted from one food to another, re-introducing an older food that they had been eating will not have ill-effects unless that food had those effects in the first place.

Currently I have Loki adjusted to all three TOTW flavours and Earthborn Primitive Natural. ToTW seems easier on his stomach, but I like to alternate because they use different ingredients and I want to fill the gaps in his diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I swap Pongo's TOTW each bag as well. Pacific stream, and high praire flavors. He seems to love the switch, keeps things more interesting I guess. He never suffers any ill effects from the different flavors either. Although I notice that on high praire he has more gas lol. Must be the fish in pacific that doesn't give gas laugh.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.