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Pete the Brit

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Everything posted by Pete the Brit

  1. My part husky escaped the other week. Cheeky girl she even went for a pet from a stranger, but no way did she want to come back, just bolted off again whenever i got near. Now there was this dead end road she's been wanting to explore for weeks now, but I refused to go up it. And that's my tip. Find somewhere with a dead end they want to go down during a daily walk and never let them. It might just be the temptation to recapture them if they ever do a runner? Failing that a squeaky toys or treats ie bribes of the first order. A dog needs to want to return I've found and food bribes work with some dogs where commands don't. Main command I use is "stop" for road curbs because of cars... I use it more than once every day and a stopped dog I recon is as just as good as a returning dog? I'd even go further and say, even if you open the front door just for a moment, don't risk that doggy isn't going to have a jail break moment. That's how mine got out, she had lulled me into a false sense of security. 😕
  2. I don't have much money either, so I've always had to find the cheap ways to do stuff, DIY or do without. What you're looking for are dog lovers, so, my first port of call would be a vet charity (PDSA in the UK) or I'd google for specialist forums like this like you've done or the nearest dog rescue centre. Now a rescue centre isn't a vet, but it will have dog lovers as carers with experience of all sorts of dog problems so if you phone them, explain the money issue and dog issue, they might be able to take a look or send you somewhere better. BTW some vets might cost cut drastically if the dog is desperate and you are broke as I was cited 160 ukp by a vet to put my last dog to sleep etc then when I said that's more than I get to live on for a fortnight the price dropped to 60. I ended up getting help for free at the PDSA.
  3. My current rescue dog is part Husky and the dog before that part Whippet. In their way they were both demanding and that probably caused them to end up in a centre. But take the time to look, and remember first and foremost they are individual dogs with fantastic personalities just wanting to love and be loved.
  4. I just happened on this video whist looking for something else The dog handler talked about why dogs bite, and although I didn't watch the ending, she was re educating the couple and dog in who was pack leader and where the dog came in the ranking. It might give you a few ideas?
  5. Food is 100% out of the training process I'm afraid to say, the rescue centre has had her for over a year and know her well now. I'm not sure how a clicker rewards them, its like Pavlov's Dog, the clicker is the trigger to salivate, but the food is the reward. But maybe if I discover she has a favourite toy, that might be the reward after a training task. So my happy face as the reward, stroking the dogs favourite body area or giving the toy.
  6. Aye she has a form of Colic and can only eat a limited number of brands types, just 2 brands so far she has tolerated. Kibble and supermarket tin food has her in agony afterwards so is a huge no-no. As are nearly all dog treats, dental chews and the like. So this led to my first ask the expert owners question in the training section, other positive means to train a dog that doesn't involve any food. I can only think of smiles and petting myself.
  7. OK here's a great start, I just found out the dog isn't food motivated to commands by rewarding with treats. It just won't work. So can you all brainstorm me with other methods for positive training? Other than human non verbal face and arm positions.
  8. Your right from all I've read, as I've been reading and watching online as much as I can. Fortunately I'm expecting the unexpected and a myriad of life 'dog challenges' for the owner to solve. I've been accepted now as her new carer, just waiting on the delivery of her special diet and a collection date sometime next week.
  9. Yes I heard about the outside deafness to the words "come here", and so had purchased the longest Amazon UK lead I could. Real shame though as the park is wonderful dog running grounds, but aside from the baby play area totally unfenced. (this will be one of my future questions if I'm approved, what games in the park, if fetch the Frisby or ball seems out). My Whippet x had no time to play with me when outside, wasn't interested in fetching balls or nothing, just running away from me then running around me in a circle, so zero experience here in how to wear a dog on a lead out as I never had to. Gardens a mess with nettles and weeds so if she wants to dig it up might be an improvement. My Whippet liked a few strategic dog holes too for bones, toys, stolen property etc. I've hung a slip on lead on the front door for the opening to strangers and stop the hound hugging the postman ritual. I used to hold the Whippet back with a hand (and leg, foot, even my body as a last resort), but this Husky x girl is far to strong for that. Pete
  10. Hi My real name is Pete and I added the Brit so you know I'm not from a country with wide open wildernesses. More so as I live in the suburbs of London quite near what used to be the WW2 Hornchurch Airdrome base, now a county park. I've joined this forum because I'm in the process of adopting a rescue dog, a 3 year old Husky cross Marmulte, and awaiting the home visit stage. I have had a rescue dog before, a whippet cross, and he loved the open spaces in the park for running, but its not fenced and I've been warned that like my whippet x, the Husky x Marmulte is a two mode dog. Sleepy (sometime naughty thieving if its not nailed down) pet in the home and the focused wild one in the open parks, loves people and other dogs, but focussed of the nemisis called CATS, but unlike the whippet the Husky x might not come back on recall. So I've joined and will be asking questions if I get accepted by the rescue home to make her new home a happy one for her. anyhow thats me, Pete
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