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  1. I'll be on maternity leave then so maybe me and baby will try to make the trip down
    3 points
  2. Personally I hate that people cross everything with a poodle these days, either get a bernese or get a poodle and research each breed to see which is a better fit and what would suit your lifestyle more , with a cross breed you never know 100% what traits you'll get from each side
    3 points
  3. Incoming in just a few months! For those I'm friends with on Facebook you'll already know this but sharing here also as this forum is like a big massive extended family Only this new pack member is not the furry kind 💙 Baby boy due 3rd January 2022
    2 points
  4. Well we didn't quite make it to January, 2nd Nov at 5:07pm Theodore was born, had a long 5 week stay in hospital but been home a week now ❤️ Met Blaze and Skyla but Blaze not that bothered so no pic of him yet lol
    2 points
  5. environmental allergies - these posts are a very good place to start. https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/5-signs-your-dog-has-food-allergies/ note, these are not the only signs! https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/natural-solutions-environmental-allergies-in-dogs/ https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/dog-allergies-quick-fix/ https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/seasonal-allergies-in-dogs/ https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/solutions-for-allergies/ Whether trying to treat environmental or food allergies - start with Bovine Colostrum (the cow is a 'universal donor' - suitable for all animals - even us) get organic. Another thing to get is dried nettle leaves - this will be mentioned in some of the posts I am sure. Dandelion leaves is also another good thing to get - this is mainly for any good gut bacterial left in your dog's intestines (their preferred food).
    2 points
  6. Amy - I am a qualified Raw Dog Food Nutrition Specialist - and I specialize in food allergies - although I may be able to make some suggestions for the environmental ones as well - give me an hour or so. There is ONE food allergy test in the UK that is 100% accurate and reliable - I know because I have a severely food allergic husky myself and he has had three of these tests over the last 4 years. My last charge for a test was £211 - not cheap - but it is the best. The test is called ALLERVET - they do both environmental and food allergies (differrent tests). The vet needs to take a blood sample and send it off for analysis - mine was done in Lancashire at a laboratory fairly close to where I live - it can take a week to 10 days. According to the NHS a blood test is the only reliable way to get accurate results. It differentiates between true allergies (IGE) and food intolerances (IGG) and also tells you whether it is Borderline, Postive or High Positive. True allergies (my boy has 9 of them) must be eliminated from the diet totally and forever - intolerances can be 'trained out' after omitting them for some time. With true food allergies - a lot of detective work is involved ..................four years ago my boy went into anaphylactic shock after eating chicken - although he is not allergic to chicken - but he is allergic to what the chicken ate in its lifetime! He can eat day old chicks with impunity - they are not fed prior to dispatch. Do an internet search for ALLERVET and see for yourself - and tell your vet to check it out (we cannot see the vet section). Other places test hair samples - these are not accurate! Can you tell me your dog's symptoms and why you think he has food allergies - in the meantime I will check out some posts for you on natural treatments of environmental allergies - not a speciality for me so need to refresh my memory. As for the red sores round his eyes and mouth - not a usual symptom of allergies - but it IS a tell-tale sign for zinc deficiency. Can you take good photos for me? Most dogs require between 15-20mg of zinc a day - puppies 22-25mg (only around 15% of ingested zinc is actually absorbed by the body) - but huskies have the highest requirement for zinc of any breed of dog ......................... some dogs up to 100mg a day - normal food (kibble of any kind and even commercial wet food) does not provide enough for some huskies. An easy way to check for this is get some zinc based cream and rub into the areas (I believe someting like sudocrem - but check first) - if they lessen or heal - then you KNOW it is a zinc deficiency - and this can be corrected with either food or medication depending on the severity. With you saying he is a picky eater - it sounds like my dog Marley until I found out about the allergies - if it is food allergies then its a long road - but it is possible to treat this totally naturally - without almost any meds - I know because of my own boy. I am also a home herbalist so treat naturally wherever possible - don't get me wrong - vet meds most certainly have their place - and if necessary I can work with most medications - but western medicine concentrates on masking the symptoms - not curing the underlying problem.
    2 points
  7. @wolfpup can you help especially on the food allergies
    2 points
  8. I make bone broth for my two boys on a weekly basis (I get lamb ribs - the bone portion of their meals, spines - you would be amazed at how much meat there is on a lamb spine, and leg bones - sawn in half for me) all free, - in exchange for a couple of 600ml tubs of bone broth. Most of the bone broth goes into the freezer for the dogs during the week - but I also fill up two ice cube trays with the liquid only - and once frozen empty the trays into a small container - and doggie bone broth ice lollies are on tap whenever the dogs fancy one. Not only do the dogs LOVE them, but bone broth ice lollies also do not set as hard as plain water does – so it is easier to eat for any old dogs. It also has the advantage of being a healthy treat - containing around 30 of the 43 vital vitamins, minerals, amino acids etc that are required daily. A high level treat that will cool them down and provide valuable nutrition - what's not to like??
    2 points
  9. My husband and I thought it was safe to go back in the Dog park today! Thinking that the mud was dried up 😂. We were Totally wrong! If there's a mud hole Blu is going to find it! He knows what's coming " The Hose "!! No Mommy has to clean the Outlander Sport😲
    2 points
  10. Today is finally warm after a long winter and Blu wanted to take a splash into the water for the first time. He's going to love 💕 swimming in our pond 😁💦 20210302_101310_1.mp4 20210302_101448.mp4
    2 points
  11. Demon thinking he's posh with his sticky out paw Then it's all change and 16 year old Friar is up on guard duty on the sofa with Kaviq sat watching the world go by Anuk deciding he doesn't want to miss out on the photos
    2 points
  12. Thanking you ☺️ Slacking Marc, pull your finger out, lad 🤣🤣
    2 points
  13. Choose whoever gets on with your current dog when meeting...
    2 points
  14. Hi, I'm BaltoSalisbury. I'm new here. I'm also a first time Siberian Huskey mom. I've never this before, so forgive my fumbling around, lol.... Balto!! He is a bit crazy!
    2 points
  15. R I P Darwin...Run Free...Run Far...Run Fast...
    1 point
  16. Agree with robke - patience, praise - and repetition. Take outside after every meal and stay there until she does something, then praise and also give a high level treat. I got Marley at 12 weeks old - and it still took another 4 weeks before he got the message. I think it depends a LOT on whether the pup was still with the mother up until you got her. Marley was taken too early (around 5 weeks we think) - I was his 4th owner by the time he came to me at 12 weeks old.
    1 point
  17. OK I've done it...... meet George. 9 weeks old and been with me 3 days. 🥰 He is soooo clever (Toilet training has been a breeze 😱)and soooo cute, but my word this is exhausting. 😂 I've taken 2 weeks off work to settle him in but I'm wondering if I'm ever going to have time to work again! He's settled into his crate really well thankfully, and those 2 hour naps he takes are like heaven 😆 I have scratches on my face and teeth marks all over my hands. My cothes are covered in muddy pawprints. Im surviving on Pot Noodles and 2 minute showers. I'm in survival mode! I love him though 😍
    1 point
  18. How old is your puppy? If he is coming out to eat and play etc he obviously feels fairly safe with you, but may have chosen under your bed as his 'safe place' where he feels secure (like a den). Is this where he chooses to sleep in his many naps throughout the day and also at night.
    1 point
  19. We will have to see…rules, regulations and the small matter of costs…
    1 point
  20. Oops! And Thank you most kindly.
    1 point
  21. After I adopted my Mina, I was at wits' end with her destructive behavior and seemingly insurmountable activity requirements. The lovely woman at the rescue organization suggested bringing Mina to the dog park a few times a week. It drains her energy in a way nothing else seemed to.... until I started bringing her to what I have been calling "school". it is a daycare for dogs where they run around with other dogs all day or half days. No more destructive behavior PERIOD. But. No more zoomies (which we love) and much shorter play sessions. But she LOVES other dogs and obviously loves to be off leash. Socialization with other dogs (esp huskies - they recognize their own kind) has been an amazing solution for Mina. She loves going, she loves when I pick her up. Win Win.
    1 point
  22. Absolutely. Here are some pix of him.
    1 point
  23. 😄 I didn't think this would be the place to disuade me !! I think the fact I'm even asking the question means I've already made up my mind. Lets be honest, no other dog even comes close to being a consideration. 😍 How are your 2 beauties doing? I remember their gorgeous faces from before.
    1 point
  24. I got a set of soft leather boots for one of my boys, - from Amazon of all places, but if you do an internet search you will find loads. (I don't know what country you are from - you don't mention it) If there is no infection in the foot I would use a combination of salt+water+calendular tincture. 20 drops of tincture in an egg cup, half a teaspoon of salt and some warm water (about 2 tablespoons) and bath the toe every hour and let dry naturally. Calendula is a fantastic skin healer and the salt will help dry out of wound.
    1 point
  25. Thank you so much for responding and the advice I really appreciate it. I am in this for the long run I know it’s going to take time and patients. I am a first time owner to a Siberian husky. She is amazing I don’t want to give up I really do enjoy having her.
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. Can not be flat....or the cats would have pushed everything off by now....
    1 point
  28. did not know that you are 87 years young...
    1 point
  29. Update: we are in the process of planning trip #2 with our pup (Luna). Her first road trip was at 12 weeks, and she is now almost 15 weeks. She did really well on her first trip (6 hours one way). No problems at all... she alternated between playing with her toys, and sleeping. I did ride in the back seat with her, and I think that was really helpful. We stopped after 2 hours but the location wasn't good - too much traffic and she was too nervous to do her business. We went a little farther to a quieter spot, and she went potty, had a drink, and stretched her legs. I won't say she loves being in the car, she more-so tolerates it, but she seems relaxed enough. Also, I believe that she must be a husky mix. She isn't fluffy like a husky. We don't care. We love her anyways. 🥰
    1 point
  30. Thats why I bought it. There is an advantage to having multiple screens instead, but for the most part, this is better lol
    1 point
  31. Good evening all you wonderful huskies and humans! Simka here barking that it has definitely been a while, but me and mommy are still doing ok in this crazy COVID time! Hope all of you are doing well too! I quickly just wanted to share with you the awesomeness that me and my Newfie friend Grizzlee stumbled across this afternoon. We are staying at Aunty Kristen’s for a couple of days and she is doggysitting us. Well, for us sneaker monsters, it has been a very ruff winter. No new sneakers to devour at all So when I heard we were going over to Aunty’s, we were totally pumped! As soon as we set foot in her house, we could smell them: Yup, there were definitely new sneakers hiding there somewhere! We let our noses lead us up stairs to the guest room and this is what we saw behind the bed: OH BOY!!! Aunty’s yummy new sneaker collection for summer! Me and GrizzLee went nutso. Mmmmm slurp! New Nikes and Reeboks. Delicious!!!! Well, before we could enjoy them, Aunty found us and made sure to lock the door. Hmmph! Well, me and Grizz just can’t stop dreaming about chewing on those new sneakers!!! Ok help us all! Convince Aunty to let us have them for dessert!!!! Simka and GrizzLee
    1 point
  32. @wolfpupall good! Apparently his third eyelid has just changed colour and that’s normal. Very strange but at least it’s nothing concerning!
    1 point
  33. hi I have spilt your thread and made your own... TO
    1 point
  34. Oh sweet Marley, I hope your eyes get better soon 😔 I get choked up when I hear another fur baby is not at their best! Blu also has Separation anxiety and does the same thing. Now he's going through ( Retaining baby teeth ) there was 4 now we're down to 1. Yes, those Vet bill's can be pricey but our fur babies are very worth it. Marley dear Tell daddy that the weight is just "FLUFF",!!!!🤣
    1 point
  35. Neighbourhood Watch Network is supporting Sussex's Police and Crime Commissioner, Katy Bourne, who, in partnership with the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC), has created an online survey designed to understand the public’s perception of dog theft, enforcement, and the prosecution of offenders. The survey includes a question seeking views on whether dogs should be treated in law merely as property when they are stolen. Having a common understanding of how the public feels about this issue will help inform discussions that PCCs and NWN will have nationally, as well as allow police forces to better understand the public’s views. Mrs Bourne said: "Pet theft, dog theft in particular, is a growing concern for the public and their fear has been perpetuated over the last couple of weeks with shocking reports in the media of more dogs being snatched by criminals. "I am incredibly eager to get more detail around this issue and understand residents’ views and if they feel more could be done to respond to their concerns or for more preventative measures to be put in place to better protect their pets.” Neighbourhood Watch Network have just been approached to help support this campaign so apologies for the short notice as the survey closes on Friday12th March. Please, if you can, and haven't already, take a couple of minutes to complete the survey as your support and views are really valuable to us. SURVEYMONKEY.CO.UK Dog theft survey
    1 point
  36. In Backwood a van with K9 Unit signage has been seen around and linked to dog thefts (van was probably brought used from police or secuirty compnay) In Beddau two men posing as RSPCA approached dog walkers claiming to check tags and chips then tried to cut leads and run off with dogs last case a freind walking a Husky Tibetian Mastff cross that i know was approached by the police and warned to take care because of the fake rspca guys So every one should take care try to walk with at least 2 people or walk in groups of dog owners
    1 point
  37. I just leave mine in the garden to dry out, mud usually falls right off , she loves jumping and splashing in puddles lol
    1 point
  38. Lots of things been happening in the last few years so been a bit absent but thought I'd drop in and say hello again to everyone old and new. Can't believe I know some of you loonies over 11 years! For those who don't know me, here's a little summary - I have my four rescue boys now, Peacekeeper Kaviq will be 10 on Wednesday 17th Feb; Dafty Demon is the baby of the bunch at 7 years old; Houdini Anuk, the naughty boy of the pack is 9 years old and Old Man Friar was 16 on New Year's Day but he forgets his age when the harness or food bowls come out. I lost my other oldie on New Year's Eve, Hoyce was nearly 15. I have been owned by this wonderful breed since Feb 2006 when I brought my first husky, Myshka, home aged 10 weeks. And it has been fun and fur ever since 🤣. So just wanted to say hello again and see what all you nutty husky owners are getting up to x
    1 point
  39. Oh no ! Glad you got him back safely
    1 point
  40. Its great to know there is another husky nut in Lancashire. I have two rescues, Marley, 6yo (someone showed him the Film Marley & Me when he was a pup - and he has taken that Marley as a role model) A loveable air-head (avatar piccy). Mikey is the relative newcomer joined us early last year when he was coming up to 3.5 / 4yo - had an unfortunate past and we are still dealing with it - one step forward and two back some days - but we are getting there, at least he hasn't bitten me for nearly 4 months. Never been bored a day since we got a husky
    1 point
  41. Well my newly adopted Husky, her name is Sesi, has a mohawk so I was thinking that she may be a husky mix because of that. Come to find out that she may not be. The kind lady who rescued her but couldn't keep her before doesn't know that much about Huskies (I do, so we are a good fit) was thinking the same thing for the same reason. Neither of us has seen one with a mohawk before. So I googled and found this forum where a Husky owner had the same question about her pooch. One answer on her post explained everything. Turns out that her hair around her head is growing in one direction while the hair on her back is growing in another and it meets at the middle where it tufts out. It appears to be parted at the middle. This is awesome! I know from her previous owner that she had her winter blowout last month. I am so pleased with this website that I decided to join.
    1 point
  42. Reading and interpreting the body language of dogs is very important; it can help you analyze behavioral problems, prevent a dog fight, or simply help you to understand your dog when it tries to communicate with you. I made this little 'guide' to help you interpret your dog's body language; if anybody would like to add anything or correct me (as I'm not perfect!), please feel free. This is just what I have learned from experience by watching dogs at the dog park interact. First of all, a nice little quote on the problem of using the 'Alpha Roll' to correct your dog's problems: Aggressive Dominance - General posture: Stiff-legged, body leaning slightly towards the cause of its behaviour. Hackles can be raised. Body stretched upward to make themselves taller; may slightly stand on toes to do so. Head high. - Eyes: Staring at the object/thing that is the cause of this behaviour. - Ears: Forward - Mouth: Lips curled up into a classic snarl, teeth showing, mouth can be open. - Muzzle: Wrinkled and tight - Tail: High in the air. Stiff. - Vocalizations: Deep growls, loud growls, aggressive barking. Will likely bite/show physical aggression if he is challenged by another dog. NOTE: Truly aggressive-dominant dogs are quite rare, and body signals may be mixed with the 'Fearful-Aggressive (Defensive)' signs. NOTE: Some dogs are leash-aggressive, this does NOT necessarily mean they are dominant. Usually dogs that are leash-aggressive feel 'trapped' because they cannot escape. As in the 'flight or fight' response, because they cannot flee (due to being attached by a leash), they have no other choice than to 'fight' or to show aggressive behaviours. Passive Dominance - General posture: Stiff-legged. Seen stretching the body to be over the other dog's head. - Eyes: Staring at the dog directly. - Ears: Forward - Mouth: closed; unless panting - Muzzle: Smooth. Smells the other dog first; can smell the face first before going to the scent glands near the anus. - Tail: Held high; stiffly wags in a tight arc when smelling dog. Wagging is medium to slow. Limited movement. - Vocalizations: Usually none. Can softly growl? Fearful-Aggressive (Defensive) - General posture: Body is low to the ground. Hackles may or may not be raised. Head low. - Eyes: Pupils are dilated; eyes wide. Eyes are staring at the cause of his fear. - Ears: Back and flat against the head. - Mouth: Lips may be slightly curled (but not as much as a snarl). Teeth also may be showing. - Muzzle: may have slight wrinkles - Tail: Tucked in between legs. Stationary. The amount of 'tuck' indicates the amount of fear...? - Vocalizations: soft growling? Barking? Will most likely bite if it continues to be threatened. Behaviour may also switch to 'Fearful' if it continues to be threatened. Fearful - General posture: Body low to the ground. Head low. - Eyes: Pupils are dilated; eyes wide. Staring at the cause of his fear. Whale eye. - Ears: Back flat against the head. - Mouth: May be panting rapidly. - Muzzle: Wrinkled and tight - Tail: Either completely in between the legs or slightly in between. (varies based on the degree of fear) - Vocalizations: Yelps, whines, yips. Will most likely flee or hide; however behaviour may change to 'Fearful-Aggressive (Defensive)' if it isn't given an option to flee the situation. Figure 4: Notice the lowered body position, the tucked in tail, the bent legs, and the lowered head and ears. This is all to make the dog appear smaller and less of a threat. Passive Submission: - General posture: Body lowered. May look away with head. - Eyes: Eye contact will be brief before they look away; may avoid contact altogether. - Ears: slightly back - Mouth: mouth closed; unless panting. - Muzzle: smooth. Allows other dog to smell first; rarely greets face to face. - Tail: low to the ground or in its normal 'relaxed' position. - Vocalizations: None Figure 5: The husky (right) is showing signs of passive submission to the boxer (left). Notice the hunched over body, the ears straight back touching the neck/head, the loose posture, and the low tail. Taken from a video I took myself, the tail was wagging (not really fast, but not slow) in a wide arc. Active Submission - General posture: Body is lowered; head is lowered. A front paw can be lifted either slightly or all the way off the ground. - Eyes: Eye contact is very brief; may be reluctant to maintain eye contact or they look away frequently from your gaze. - Ears: Back - Mouth: Licking the more dominant dog's chin (or, if your a person, licking your chin if they can reach!) - Muzzle: smooth/relaxed - Tail: low to the ground. - Vocalizations: Can whine. Complete Submission - General posture: Rolled over on back, showing his jugular and stomach. Head turned to completely avoid eye contact. May sprinkle some urine. Allows more dominant dog to stand over him. - Eyes: Slightly closed. - Ears: Back; flat against head. - Mouth: closed; unless panting - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: In between legs as far as it'll go. - Vocalizations: Long whines, yelps. Playful Usually 'invites' play by play bowing. (lowering self's nose towards the ground; butt high in air. Tail wagging). Can hold play bow until other dog responds with their own bow, or release it right away when other dog does not respond. - General posture: Relaxed. Pace is bouncy when running/trotting. Might jump in the air while running. May also roll around on the ground (scent rolling), with tongue lolling out of mouth. - Eyes: normal/relaxed - Ears: relaxed - Mouth: Closed, usually panting. If play fighting, teeth may show, but no other signs of aggression (no growling, etc.). Tongue is loose; may loll out of mouth. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: varying levels of height depending on their current mood during play. Can be wagging quickly. - Vocalizations: Playful growls (soft, broken up), yips, yowls, barks. Figure 8: the Siberian Husky in this photograph is inviting the other dog to play. Relaxed - General posture: Relaxed. Loose. - Eyes: Normal; blinks slowly. May have half-lidded eyes if lying down. - Ears: 'normal' position. - Mouth: Closed, or panting. Tongue may be loose. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: in the 'normal' position. - Vocalizations: Usually no sound. Figure 9: The Siberian Husky in the photo is relaxed. Note the partly closed eyelids and the loose tongue. Happy/Excited Similar to 'playful' - General posture: Relaxed position. Pace may be bouncy or feel 'light' - Eyes: wide eyes; but relaxed. - Ears: back, touching head. - Mouth: Usually open, with tongue loose. May loll out of mouth. Dogs that are not properly trained will mouth your body (usually hands) and loose clothing or lightly nip at them. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: wagging rapidly in wide arcs. Loose movement. - Vocalizations: Excited yips, yowls, woos, howls, barks. Hunting - General posture: Body low to the ground. Walking very slowly. Places steps deliberately and slowly as to not make a sound. Freezing position when the animal turns to look at them; resumes stalking towards animal if it looks away and does not flee. - Eyes: Staring at the animal. - Ears: Perked; erect and pointing towards prey. - Mouth: Immediately stops panting if they were. Mouth closed. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: Can be lowered, to help one look smaller to aid in stealth. Can also be stiffly held straight backwards. - Vocalizations: None. Very soft and quiet breathing. Pain Depending on the degree of pain and where it hurts, their reaction to pain tends to differ. This part's format will be different than previous...as the previous formats are not applicable. In general, most dogs try to hide their pain - and are very effective at it! Most, from my experience, don't vocalize their pain unless it REALLY hurts (like a broken bone.) You might notice small differences in their movements - for example, if they are experiencing arthritis in one of their hips, you might notice a very slight limp. The dog would favour that leg and use the other legs more - this is seen by the difference in muscle mass. The leg that is hurt would have less muscle mass than the other legs because it is not being used as often. You also might notice behaviour changes. Maybe they are walking a little slower than usual, not pulling as hard, or falling behind slightly on walks. They might have difficulty going up stairs, or they might have difficulty getting up from the lying down position. Their appetite might have decreased. In summary, the following is a list of behavioural changes you might notice when your dog is hurt or suffering: - Loss of appetite - Stumbling - Having trouble getting up/down stairs. - Difficulty in getting up (from sitting or lying down) - Reluctance to exercise - Reluctance to play - Temperament changes - more aggressive or very timid - Lethargic - Favouring a certain part of the body - Atrophied muscle of the favoured limb (if applicable) due to favouring it. - Swelling of the hurt joint/muscle/limb - Bleeding (Anyone is free to add to this list!) In addition to different types and classifications of pain, there's also the sudden pain reactions (like whining, whimpering, or yelping) or the more-difficult-to-spot gradually increasing pain. Also, different breeds have different pain thresholds (or the amount of pain they can stand before they start showing signs). Breeds that were bred to fight, for example the Pit Bull breeds, would have a higher pain threshold (and therefore not show as many signs - or none at all!) than a breed that has been bred to do something else. Other Misc Behaviours... Scent-Marking There are many ways for dogs to mark their scent: scratching the ground, urinating on objects (usually vertical objects, if possible, with their leg hiked if they are more of the dominant type), and scent-rolling. Scratching the ground usually occurs after the dog pees on an object, although it can occur just by itself. Up to 4 paws can scratch the ground, although some dogs only use the 2 hind paws. The paws contain glands that secrete the dog's individual scent; the scraping action stimulates these glands to create more 'scent' to wipe on the ground. Another method of scent-marking is by urinating on an object. In either sex, the dog will lift its leg up (hike it up) to mark on the object - that is usually vertical. The higher the dog lifts its leg, the more dominant it is trying to be as it would want its scent to be as high as possible. In more dominant dogs, the dog might 'mark' or pee over another dog's urine or it might pee on a lot of objects (like, for example, on a walk or at the dog park.), or it might 're-urinate' over the objects it already urinated on. A 3rd method of scent-marking is by rolling around on the ground. This spreads their scent over a wider area than the 'urine' method or the 'scraping' method. They can roll over multiple times, or just once.The dog can also do this in play, however. Humping/Mounting - Why does my dog do it? Please read the following link - it contains 4 pages of an article that explains why they hump and how its a perfectly normal behavior. (But, you can still correct it if you don't like it.) www.husky-owners.com/forum/index.php?/topic/42769-humping-why-do-they-do-it For more visual aids on dog body language, please visit these 2 excellent threads: http://www.husky-owners.com/forum/threads/listen-by-looking.36065/ http://www.husky-owners.com/forum/threads/let-me-hear-your-body-talk.36072/
    1 point
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