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  1. Hej! It's been absolute ages since I posted something here (although I occasionally logged in here), but I just wanted to post something at least! I can't believe it's been already this long ago since my camp visits. It was certainly loads of fun, even when I was not a dog owner myself back then. I always kind of hoped that *at some point* I would figure out a way to visit with my dogs but logistically, and time-wise this was never really an option for me, sadly. Even though it's been such a long time ago, I still have great memories of it. I met many fun people, and it certainly helped fueling my interest in huskies even more which eventually brought me all the way north, working and living at a sled dog kennel among many, many huskies. Thanks for providing the experience!
    4 points
  2. I blundered into to the World of Huskies with Logan. Found the forum and found the family. We would not have the crazy fur balls we have today without you all. Logan (RIP), Lucy, Ares and Khaos have loved every camp. As have we. Thank you for everything, decorating my caravan, , dressing me in nappies, baywatch suits & mankinis. Thank you all for being my friends, more like family.
    4 points
  3. As regulars will already know by now, it has come to the point where husky camp is no longer something that we are going to be doing as an official forum thing. This is something we have thought about, and has honestly been coming for a while. The 2 missed camps through covid, and the removal of main camp by the site we were using, has simply emphasised that fact. This and the fact we are getting to the point numbers are dwindling year on year, we have people who struggle to get about more, dogs who are getting a lot older in some cases, so even the walks at times are becoming more and more an issue. People now have children. As a history, camp started officially back in 2009 as "Husky holiday". There were only 8 of us at the time, and all in tents in the middle of a field. I will never forget Sarah shouting that day "I am never staying in a f**** tent again" not realising, she was in a tent and everyone laughed as they could hear LOL. It was good fun and escalated from there. We couldn't take Kaiser on much of a walk as he was only little at the time. Now he is an old man LOL By 2012, we were fund raising and running a competition to bring someone over from overseas to camp. We have brought over someone from the Netherlands, and 2 people from the USA, all through fund raising. At the 2012 camp there were over 100 people. It's the largest we had, and it was great fun. For all who were there, its likely not something they will ever forget. (I certainly won't). Most people were staying in caravans. We had all our own kit on the go, a central location for husky camp, organised walks, competitions, fun awards for camp things, silly games and more. So, now we are in 2022. This weekend consisted of 17 people, 15 of which have been for many years. 4 of these are the people who organise camp. It was always going to end at some point, and we feel now is that time. To me and Sarah personally, this community has been a great part of our lives for a long time. We started this forum because Sarah wanted to meet a couple of people with Huskies. Needless to say, it escalated. Our puppies who we wanted to be able to go on holiday with, are now old. Our family is now bigger. Our own circumstances have changed. We will see people again, no doubt. There are certainly some of you who I know will likely be back up here camping, getting caravans etc, and we will certainly come see people who do. But for us, the time has come to end camp where it began. With a few great friends, who are now lifelong friends. Thank you to every person who has ever attended a camp.
    3 points
  4. Gutted we never got chance to come to a main camp , but I've loved all the meet ups over the years too
    3 points
  5. Sorry to hear the news about beautiful Skyla, and I believe you have made the right decision - she has had the best life with you guys, just love her a bit more every day.
    2 points
  6. thanks for the memories my FRIENDS no FAMILY I should say...Love you all.... some more then others LOL...
    2 points
  7. Very sad but no one can take away the memories we have had over the years loved.
    2 points
  8. Great to meet everyone on the walk Saturday and on the camp site. Sorry now I only booked 2 nights. Hope to see you again next year. Looking forward to hearing about the next one. Thanks again. Ruth
    2 points
  9. Well we didn't quite make it to January, 2nd Nov at 5:07pm Theodore was born, had a long 5 week stay in hospital but been home a week now ❤️ Met Blaze and Skyla but Blaze not that bothered so no pic of him yet lol
    2 points
  10. Sadly our boisterous, bossy, beautiful, bitchy Miss Bindi has gone across the rainbow bridge today. She was one a kind for sure. Her illness hit suddenly and hard. We shall miss her domineering way of getting just what she wanted RUN FREE...RUN FAST...RUN FAR... Miss Bindi.. Love you....
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. Oh rob I'm so sorry! R.i.p bindi
    1 point
  13. So sorry for you both. Run free lovely lady.
    1 point
  14. Bear Stout 10/1/2005 - 9/30/2022 17 years Is a long time for a big old dog to live. But he had a big heart, guess he had a lot to give. Friend and protector, he helped me to live 17 years Ain't long enough For a good old dog to live. I wouldn't wonder that God would judge us by releasing our pets to us when we arrive and seeing how they react. I feel pretty certain there are paws in heaven. And a good one has gone to see. https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=659543172260969&set=a.659539865594633 Goodbye Bear, hope to see you again.
    1 point
  15. Other than this being a topic from 11 month ago, advertising a camp that took place 5 months ago, and was discontinued on a permenant basis 3 months ago, you're perfectly right LOL
    1 point
  16. There is certainly German Shepherd and a little pit I think - but you already know from the dna what genes she has - does it really matter? Sorry but I never understand why people need to know what percentages of what dog there is in a mixed breed puppy. Love her for who she is. There is a healthy mix of different dogs/breeds in her that she should have no undesirable genes (unlike my 100% husky). You have a happy healthy pup who appears to be really enjoying life.
    1 point
  17. Here is Photographic Paintings, I did with Sofi. We are home visiting with family before we take to the road again. Enjoy.. Add yours below..
    1 point
  18. OK I have just deleted everything I was going to say. I know nothing about a 'pomchi' but very often a mix of two breeds - can result in a dog with the worst traits of both breeds - so you need to really do your research on the breed characteristics of both parents. Also I think that paying hundreds of pounds for a cross-breed is a little daft - but then again its just my opinion. If your parents have money to waste - go for it. However there are thousands of dogs in shelters badly in need of a good home. My recommendation for a breed of dog for the first time owner - is a labrador. They are the most 'forgiving' of new dog owners. Actively want to please you (unlike a husky for example). Please do not consider a husky unless your parents are experienced dog owners. They can never be let off-lead unless in a secure park with at least 6ft fencing, are consummate escape artisits, do NOT want to please you, do tricks, be obedient, etc (unlike a labrador) - will constantly argue with you, and will outwit you constantly. Huskies do not like to be alone, get bored very easily - and a bored husky is something to be feared (i.e. watch out for your furniture).
    1 point
  19. if you have a good vet, I know they could be rare, then they will tell you exactly what to do...
    1 point
  20. I am afraid no-one will click onto an unknown link. You could always copy and paste the information if you want other members to read it.
    1 point
  21. So I thought I would jump on here as it's been well over a year. So all this time later, and the sassy attitude carried on... you tell her no and she back chats every time LOL. I love her to bits. She has such an energetic personality, very loving. She has learnt lots of commands such as sit, down, stay, wait, play dead, speak and to not touch her food until the command word has been said. I also got a dog behaviourist to come out when she was roughly 6 months old to help with some of the training (walking, reactivity etc). My biggest struggle with her currently is still our daily walks. She is super friendly and inquisitive that whenever she sees another dog, or they start barking, she jumps around and screams and yaps at the top of her lungs at all hours of the morning... the training is forever with Huskies. She loooooooves her mate, GSD. They love being together, pretty inseparable. I usually get the dog wash people to come around monthly and the Husky is always done first and then the GSD but still will always fret whenever he's not around. At first I was worried from all the comments I used to read everywhere about how Huskies couldn't be left longer than 4 hours at a time, this used to make me think I wasn't doing good enough job until you realise you need to work to make a living and to even care for them. I definitely think having the second dog that was on his own first helped a lot. As long as you are walking before work, come home do some training and play with them until they go to sleep, they are living a good life. Weekend consist of going out on adventures also. I constantly check my cameras and she is either chilling out, eating her enrichment toy/treat or playing with her mate. No howling or trying to escape. All in all, we are all happy living our best lives! Here are some photos.
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. Thank you. She is definitely a Diva 🤣🥰😊 Actually she has an amazing recall. I have been training her since she was 6 months old... Yes she isn't my first Husky or Northern breed, I'm very aware of the Escape Artist kick they get... It just takes consistency. I spent most of my life training gun dogs aka hunting dogs. So when I got my first Northern breed, I realized pretty quickly I needed to change my tactics up... It's just more a work out for her and me.. But we are both really happy 😊 Note: she stays on leash when we are in tight situations like trails. But open ground or waterbank, she is free to run.
    1 point
  24. That's what I'm doing. He needs a behaviourist due to previous owner. I've trained him. However the reactivity is the issue.
    1 point
  25. Sofi looks like an angel. If any dog would settle with a nomadic life - a husky would - (and probably welcome it). One thing to know about huskies though is that they are not normally recommended off-lead - A. because they have the highest prey-drive of any domestic dog, - and B. they are not known for their recall once they reach full adulthood. Saying that - there are always exceptions to the rule ..................... just wish my two were! Will definitely look forward to your photographs of your travels - welcome to the forum.
    1 point
  26. That her now and that’s the mother and father 🥰 That’s mom and dad
    1 point
  27. My baby is growing so fast 🥺
    1 point
  28. Thanks for being part of our Husky family Jos.
    1 point
  29. It has been an adventure, We will see each other again. Thank you for creating this wonderful forum and for giving us the chance to meet in person so many incredible people as you say from all over the world. Gonna miss camp, it's been a part of my family's life for 11 years. Thanks to all who participated over the years.
    1 point
  30. Gorgeous pair of dogs! I agree huskies need a partner in crime.
    1 point
  31. Sunday walk. Along front up to tides. Meet at main campsite buildings area at 1pm
    1 point
  32. It is possible that he is drinking too much too quickly, but just to be on the safe side I would get him checked by another vet if at all possible, just because he is so young.
    1 point
  33. Hello we have 4 dogs all are rescues 2 are huskies 2 seniors we are seniors we would like a camp so we could relax The huskies are too much for ys Susan and Gary Carter Boston Buddy Summit (white) Scout (grey)(blind and deaf on right side) Ps i tried to copy and paste a photo but didnt work out
    1 point
  34. R I P Darwin...Run Free...Run Far...Run Fast...
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. Finally booked a Caravan for Camp, bloody expensive . . . .but we'll be there
    1 point
  37. Happy Christmas Storm - and welcome to the forum you gorgeous little girl.
    1 point
  38. Just got a 6foot fence on one side and a 10 foot hedge on the other side only once escaped because the kids forgot to close the gate…no other gadgets needed with mine…
    1 point
  39. Best advice… patience patience ( not for sale in the supermarket) and praises, lots of it, when she does it outside. And the not shouting is not being soft the old way of rubbing her nose in it does not work at all….
    1 point
  40. OK I've done it...... meet George. 9 weeks old and been with me 3 days. 🥰 He is soooo clever (Toilet training has been a breeze 😱)and soooo cute, but my word this is exhausting. 😂 I've taken 2 weeks off work to settle him in but I'm wondering if I'm ever going to have time to work again! He's settled into his crate really well thankfully, and those 2 hour naps he takes are like heaven 😆 I have scratches on my face and teeth marks all over my hands. My cothes are covered in muddy pawprints. Im surviving on Pot Noodles and 2 minute showers. I'm in survival mode! I love him though 😍
    1 point
  41. Something about his face looks like a 'breed' I've seen which isn't a husky, I can't remember the name of it now (not a Klee Kai - something else). To be honest, if you were concerned about the welfare of the dog, you shouldn't have bought him from there. Buying dogs from places like that just funds them to breed more! They are usually bred in puppy farms, or come from back yard breeders. They are bred in tiny dark cages, the mothers are bred to death, and they are usually separated from their mother too soon. You shouldn't breed a malamute with a husky. Mals are a lot bigger than huskies which is dangerous for the mother. Also it would be unethical of you to breed from a dog that you have no background about. Plus there are so many mals and huskies on rescues because people just get them because they 'are pretty' they have no idea what they are getting them self into. I could never breed my dog for that reason, I would be worried about the pups being sold on or ending up in rescues. I think the best thing you can do is get him neutered, and never buy from a pet shop again Sent from my iPhone using Husky Owners mobile app
    1 point
  42. Reading and interpreting the body language of dogs is very important; it can help you analyze behavioral problems, prevent a dog fight, or simply help you to understand your dog when it tries to communicate with you. I made this little 'guide' to help you interpret your dog's body language; if anybody would like to add anything or correct me (as I'm not perfect!), please feel free. This is just what I have learned from experience by watching dogs at the dog park interact. First of all, a nice little quote on the problem of using the 'Alpha Roll' to correct your dog's problems: Aggressive Dominance - General posture: Stiff-legged, body leaning slightly towards the cause of its behaviour. Hackles can be raised. Body stretched upward to make themselves taller; may slightly stand on toes to do so. Head high. - Eyes: Staring at the object/thing that is the cause of this behaviour. - Ears: Forward - Mouth: Lips curled up into a classic snarl, teeth showing, mouth can be open. - Muzzle: Wrinkled and tight - Tail: High in the air. Stiff. - Vocalizations: Deep growls, loud growls, aggressive barking. Will likely bite/show physical aggression if he is challenged by another dog. NOTE: Truly aggressive-dominant dogs are quite rare, and body signals may be mixed with the 'Fearful-Aggressive (Defensive)' signs. NOTE: Some dogs are leash-aggressive, this does NOT necessarily mean they are dominant. Usually dogs that are leash-aggressive feel 'trapped' because they cannot escape. As in the 'flight or fight' response, because they cannot flee (due to being attached by a leash), they have no other choice than to 'fight' or to show aggressive behaviours. Passive Dominance - General posture: Stiff-legged. Seen stretching the body to be over the other dog's head. - Eyes: Staring at the dog directly. - Ears: Forward - Mouth: closed; unless panting - Muzzle: Smooth. Smells the other dog first; can smell the face first before going to the scent glands near the anus. - Tail: Held high; stiffly wags in a tight arc when smelling dog. Wagging is medium to slow. Limited movement. - Vocalizations: Usually none. Can softly growl? Fearful-Aggressive (Defensive) - General posture: Body is low to the ground. Hackles may or may not be raised. Head low. - Eyes: Pupils are dilated; eyes wide. Eyes are staring at the cause of his fear. - Ears: Back and flat against the head. - Mouth: Lips may be slightly curled (but not as much as a snarl). Teeth also may be showing. - Muzzle: may have slight wrinkles - Tail: Tucked in between legs. Stationary. The amount of 'tuck' indicates the amount of fear...? - Vocalizations: soft growling? Barking? Will most likely bite if it continues to be threatened. Behaviour may also switch to 'Fearful' if it continues to be threatened. Fearful - General posture: Body low to the ground. Head low. - Eyes: Pupils are dilated; eyes wide. Staring at the cause of his fear. Whale eye. - Ears: Back flat against the head. - Mouth: May be panting rapidly. - Muzzle: Wrinkled and tight - Tail: Either completely in between the legs or slightly in between. (varies based on the degree of fear) - Vocalizations: Yelps, whines, yips. Will most likely flee or hide; however behaviour may change to 'Fearful-Aggressive (Defensive)' if it isn't given an option to flee the situation. Figure 4: Notice the lowered body position, the tucked in tail, the bent legs, and the lowered head and ears. This is all to make the dog appear smaller and less of a threat. Passive Submission: - General posture: Body lowered. May look away with head. - Eyes: Eye contact will be brief before they look away; may avoid contact altogether. - Ears: slightly back - Mouth: mouth closed; unless panting. - Muzzle: smooth. Allows other dog to smell first; rarely greets face to face. - Tail: low to the ground or in its normal 'relaxed' position. - Vocalizations: None Figure 5: The husky (right) is showing signs of passive submission to the boxer (left). Notice the hunched over body, the ears straight back touching the neck/head, the loose posture, and the low tail. Taken from a video I took myself, the tail was wagging (not really fast, but not slow) in a wide arc. Active Submission - General posture: Body is lowered; head is lowered. A front paw can be lifted either slightly or all the way off the ground. - Eyes: Eye contact is very brief; may be reluctant to maintain eye contact or they look away frequently from your gaze. - Ears: Back - Mouth: Licking the more dominant dog's chin (or, if your a person, licking your chin if they can reach!) - Muzzle: smooth/relaxed - Tail: low to the ground. - Vocalizations: Can whine. Complete Submission - General posture: Rolled over on back, showing his jugular and stomach. Head turned to completely avoid eye contact. May sprinkle some urine. Allows more dominant dog to stand over him. - Eyes: Slightly closed. - Ears: Back; flat against head. - Mouth: closed; unless panting - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: In between legs as far as it'll go. - Vocalizations: Long whines, yelps. Playful Usually 'invites' play by play bowing. (lowering self's nose towards the ground; butt high in air. Tail wagging). Can hold play bow until other dog responds with their own bow, or release it right away when other dog does not respond. - General posture: Relaxed. Pace is bouncy when running/trotting. Might jump in the air while running. May also roll around on the ground (scent rolling), with tongue lolling out of mouth. - Eyes: normal/relaxed - Ears: relaxed - Mouth: Closed, usually panting. If play fighting, teeth may show, but no other signs of aggression (no growling, etc.). Tongue is loose; may loll out of mouth. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: varying levels of height depending on their current mood during play. Can be wagging quickly. - Vocalizations: Playful growls (soft, broken up), yips, yowls, barks. Figure 8: the Siberian Husky in this photograph is inviting the other dog to play. Relaxed - General posture: Relaxed. Loose. - Eyes: Normal; blinks slowly. May have half-lidded eyes if lying down. - Ears: 'normal' position. - Mouth: Closed, or panting. Tongue may be loose. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: in the 'normal' position. - Vocalizations: Usually no sound. Figure 9: The Siberian Husky in the photo is relaxed. Note the partly closed eyelids and the loose tongue. Happy/Excited Similar to 'playful' - General posture: Relaxed position. Pace may be bouncy or feel 'light' - Eyes: wide eyes; but relaxed. - Ears: back, touching head. - Mouth: Usually open, with tongue loose. May loll out of mouth. Dogs that are not properly trained will mouth your body (usually hands) and loose clothing or lightly nip at them. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: wagging rapidly in wide arcs. Loose movement. - Vocalizations: Excited yips, yowls, woos, howls, barks. Hunting - General posture: Body low to the ground. Walking very slowly. Places steps deliberately and slowly as to not make a sound. Freezing position when the animal turns to look at them; resumes stalking towards animal if it looks away and does not flee. - Eyes: Staring at the animal. - Ears: Perked; erect and pointing towards prey. - Mouth: Immediately stops panting if they were. Mouth closed. - Muzzle: Smooth - Tail: Can be lowered, to help one look smaller to aid in stealth. Can also be stiffly held straight backwards. - Vocalizations: None. Very soft and quiet breathing. Pain Depending on the degree of pain and where it hurts, their reaction to pain tends to differ. This part's format will be different than previous...as the previous formats are not applicable. In general, most dogs try to hide their pain - and are very effective at it! Most, from my experience, don't vocalize their pain unless it REALLY hurts (like a broken bone.) You might notice small differences in their movements - for example, if they are experiencing arthritis in one of their hips, you might notice a very slight limp. The dog would favour that leg and use the other legs more - this is seen by the difference in muscle mass. The leg that is hurt would have less muscle mass than the other legs because it is not being used as often. You also might notice behaviour changes. Maybe they are walking a little slower than usual, not pulling as hard, or falling behind slightly on walks. They might have difficulty going up stairs, or they might have difficulty getting up from the lying down position. Their appetite might have decreased. In summary, the following is a list of behavioural changes you might notice when your dog is hurt or suffering: - Loss of appetite - Stumbling - Having trouble getting up/down stairs. - Difficulty in getting up (from sitting or lying down) - Reluctance to exercise - Reluctance to play - Temperament changes - more aggressive or very timid - Lethargic - Favouring a certain part of the body - Atrophied muscle of the favoured limb (if applicable) due to favouring it. - Swelling of the hurt joint/muscle/limb - Bleeding (Anyone is free to add to this list!) In addition to different types and classifications of pain, there's also the sudden pain reactions (like whining, whimpering, or yelping) or the more-difficult-to-spot gradually increasing pain. Also, different breeds have different pain thresholds (or the amount of pain they can stand before they start showing signs). Breeds that were bred to fight, for example the Pit Bull breeds, would have a higher pain threshold (and therefore not show as many signs - or none at all!) than a breed that has been bred to do something else. Other Misc Behaviours... Scent-Marking There are many ways for dogs to mark their scent: scratching the ground, urinating on objects (usually vertical objects, if possible, with their leg hiked if they are more of the dominant type), and scent-rolling. Scratching the ground usually occurs after the dog pees on an object, although it can occur just by itself. Up to 4 paws can scratch the ground, although some dogs only use the 2 hind paws. The paws contain glands that secrete the dog's individual scent; the scraping action stimulates these glands to create more 'scent' to wipe on the ground. Another method of scent-marking is by urinating on an object. In either sex, the dog will lift its leg up (hike it up) to mark on the object - that is usually vertical. The higher the dog lifts its leg, the more dominant it is trying to be as it would want its scent to be as high as possible. In more dominant dogs, the dog might 'mark' or pee over another dog's urine or it might pee on a lot of objects (like, for example, on a walk or at the dog park.), or it might 're-urinate' over the objects it already urinated on. A 3rd method of scent-marking is by rolling around on the ground. This spreads their scent over a wider area than the 'urine' method or the 'scraping' method. They can roll over multiple times, or just once.The dog can also do this in play, however. Humping/Mounting - Why does my dog do it? Please read the following link - it contains 4 pages of an article that explains why they hump and how its a perfectly normal behavior. (But, you can still correct it if you don't like it.) www.husky-owners.com/forum/index.php?/topic/42769-humping-why-do-they-do-it For more visual aids on dog body language, please visit these 2 excellent threads: http://www.husky-owners.com/forum/threads/listen-by-looking.36065/ http://www.husky-owners.com/forum/threads/let-me-hear-your-body-talk.36072/
    1 point
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