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Mazz

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Mazz last won the day on August 20 2016

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About Mazz

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    Under Rated - Over Stated
  • Birthday 02/28/1953

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  • Real Name
    Dave
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    Iowa Quad-Cities
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  1. What was your mom doing when your dog attacked? Is you dog intact, or has he been neutered? Have you had your vet check him to see if he has any health issues causing him pain? How many hours of human interaction per day with your dog? You indicate he has bitten before, that he is food aggressive, and he is territorial. Most dogs will growl before they bite, Some people try and train the growling out of the equation (not a good idea); sometimes they do so without realizing. If your dog growled and your mom ignored the growl, then the dog is not at fault. It would really help to know the timeline of events that lead up to the biting, and the dog's demeanor immediately afterward. If your dog is food aggressive, you might feed him by hand. Also, don't know if you leave food out all the time or not. If you do, stop that practice. When you feed him, do so in a quiet area, with others in the house, are elsewhere in the house. I would muzzle him until you have a keen sense of the issue and know how to control it. If he is territorial for possessions like toys, chew sticks, that is most likely the same as food aggression. If he is territorial over space, as if someone gets too close, that is true territorial behavior. It is situations like yours that can lead communities to label Huskies as aggressive. I'm not blaming you, just making a statement. The fact that this is not the first time your dog has bitten, may indicate you have your work cut out for you. Convincing your mom to give him a chance may be the hardest part. The bottom line is, you need to take positive steps and really work with your dog, either through a behaviorist, or on your own, but I would start out with a behaviorist. Just be aware, it is going to be expensive, but I don't think you have too many options.
  2. Gosh, it's been awhile. Work has me traveling more these days. My employer split our department into two departments - one Training; the other Documentation. I was asked to head up Documentation. So I have to split my time between two locations - eastern Iowa and northern Kentucky. Zoya still rules the roost. Her cruciate ligament surgery from a couple years back remains in good check. She recently had her ninth birthday. It's hard to believe that she is nine. She still runs a bit, but not like she used to. When she tore her cruciate ligament, she was running. I imagine she still remembers the pain from that day. She remains my baby girl. Her only chronic health issue is she is allergic to grass pollen. So from Spring through Fall, she is on allergy meds. Zoya Rohn will be three this coming Halloween. He is from the Trick-or-Treat Pack, as his breeder calls it. Rohn and Zoya came from the same kennel. Their breeder recently retired from breeding, though she still defends those dogs she has placed if their owners fail at their responsibilities. Rohn is a bit goofy. He won't walk on hard surface flooring - scares him to death. So we have runners for him. Once he makes it through the "gauntlet" he gives his triumphant howl. Rohn is the talkingest (I don't think that is a word) Husky. Whenever someone comes home, he howls for five to ten minutes, non-stop. Rohn And then there is Good Luke, our rescue. Luke has been with us for about 14 months. He is first at getting up in the morning, first to finish his meals, first to be out the door, but last when it comes to settling in for the night. We had some tense moments early on. The snarling, gnashing of teeth, and a wee bit of blood here and there. Eventually, everyone learned their place, and Luke gets along great, especially with Rohn. Luke and Rohn spar quite a lot, but after a few minutes they go to their neutral corners. If we play a video off Facebook, from the rescue where Luke came from, and it has the voice of the woman who heads up the rescue, Luke takes notice. She worked with Luke and was probably the first person ever, to show Luke some attention. Luke Well, that should bring a few things up to date. I have often said, this forum is a special place. It still is. Feels like home. Have you Hugged your Husky today? Better get on that!
  3. Just saw this on the news. Nineteen fatalities and 50 injured. Report said those numbers could rise. Officials tagging it as an act of terrorism. Prayers for those in attendance.
  4. Furminators be d***d. They both damage the guard hairs and they can strip the guard hairs. Not a good grooming tool for a Husky.
  5. Welcome to the forum and congratulations. Kudos for adopting.
  6. Bladder control does not really kick in until a male is about three to four months old. Are there other pets in the house That can make potty training more difficult. During the night, is anyone taking him out on a schedule? With Zoya (female) and Rohn (male), I got up every two hours every night for their first six months and took each one out for potty time. Thank goodness they are five years apart. Bladder capacity at eight weeks, is about full every hour and a half to two hours. Play, drink, or eat, and that time is cut to five to ten minutes. Bladder capacity does not hit the overnight time frame until they are around six months old. When he potties outside, praise him, treat him, then praise him again. When he potties inside, DO NOT SCOLD him. Believe it or not, that does absolutely no good in training him, and may extend the time it takes to potty train. If you catch him in the act, pick him up and take him out on the spot. If another person is at home, they should clean the area while the pup is outside. Praise the good deeds and ignore the mistakes. I know it's not always easy, but try as best as you can to not get upset or angry when mistakes happen. And puppy pads serve one purpose - to help the companies who make and sell puppy pads to improve their bottom line.
  7. You are lucky the rocks have been thrown up. I would muzzle the pup when outside. A small rock that passes from the stomach can lodge in the intestine. If that happens, you will need to get your dog to a vet very quickly. Surgery is often the only option.
  8. Don't let a furminator attack your dog's coat. Not only can they damage the guard hairs, they can strip the guard hairs. If the follicles remain with the guard hairs that are stripped, new guard hairs may not return.
  9. I would not have used alcohol. Saline solution would be my choice. Keep it clean. I would have your vet check it over. There is an illness called cat scratch fever, due to the amount of bacteria on cats claws. If there is any redness, swelling, weepage, don't wait too long before visiting your vet.
  10. It appears to be the refracted light exiting the pupil.
  11. Same back at you. Sent from my LG-US996 using Husky Owners mobile app
  12. Came across this quote sometime back, and thought it really puts into perspective the relationship between a human and a dog. The fidelity of a dog is a precious gift demanding no less binding moral responsibilities than the friendship of a human being. The bond with a dog is as lasting as the ties of this earth can ever be. ~Conrad Lorenz
  13. Every dog is different. Ours are short hair Huskies. On the two we've had since pups, the old guard hairs left as the new guard hairs appeared. That happened somewhere between ten and twelve months on one, and between nine and ten months on the other. If you were to furrow down to the skin, you may see the new guard hairs coming in.
  14. This would concern me as well. I assume you have a Husky. If so, Huskies do not eat nor do they need, as much food as is listed on the product bag. It could be the flavor of the food does not sit well with your pup. How long have you had her? If only a few days, she may still be settling in. If a week or more, then that is probably not the issue. How are her stools? Firm, soft, runny? Any mucous on the stools? Has she been checked by a veterinarian yet? If not, I would do so. Take a sample of her stools (fresh - like from the same day) and have them checked for parasites. Is she drinking normally? Going to the bathroom normally? If she were an adult, you might have the luxury of waiting a week and seeing if she bounced back and started eating more. Since she is a pup, I'm afraid you don't have time on your side. I would highly recommend you get her into your vet and have her checked over. She could be influenced by an illness that needs medical intervention. Or it could be a simple issue, such as the food itself. Best to not take any chances. Good luck.
  15. Chances are, after a day or so, your dog will adjust with you not being there. Don't know if this is true or not, but have been told that a dog's memory is such, that in a day or two of absence, they forget all about you. It's funny though, because when they see you again after an absence, they go nuts. Sent from my LG-US996 using Husky Owners mobile app
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