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Maz51

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498 Learning The Ropes

About Maz51

  • Rank
    Valued Contributor
  • Birthday 09/27/1951

Profile Information

  • Real Name
    Marianne Cottee, nee Chambers, Mayes, (adopted) Mayhook (born Rasmussen)
  • Location
    Tewkesbury
  • Country Flag
    England
  • Occupation
    Retired: Theatre Nurse; Med/PA secretary; nearly 10 years as VR in Sea and Air Cadets;
  • Biography
    Born Denmark. Two siblings - recently discovered via DNA that we all have different fathers! both parents now passed. (I found at 58yrs five months after father's demise that I was adopted by him from children's home (born out of wedlock)aged nearly 4)and sister's father was also mine but...DNA genetic testing via 123andMe.com shot that down last year. NO worries - they were amazing parents.
    My husband looked at my striken face saying - 'You're not the woman I thought you were!' ROFL.... then
    Schooled in Oz. Grew up on a farm with eccentric mum/pioneer who introduced 5,000 new chicken stock into North Borneo.
    We also rescued several hundred dogs, cats - kittens & puppies out there and looked after orang-utans (48 over 8 years) otters, anteaters, mousedeer, gibbons, macaques, parrots, heron, African Grey, rats and bats (my pets) slow lorris', horse (retired young racehorse from Ireland/Singapore, rescued circus pony and other unusual animals. Rescued baby crocs from the pot too.
    Moved house 38 times.
    Moved to UK Dec 1969.
    School Ed. ended at 13.
    Nursing studies 1972-76 and Post grad nursing course in Theatre at Charing Cross following six months night duties at Guy's.
    Since then I studied and worked and hold about 8 'A' levels through my nursing, VR work (received my Diamond Jubilee medal)and private studies incl RSA course in Secretarial studies at Bracknell College and an Anaesthetic/Theatre perioperative practitioner (all rounder) Refresher Course at UWE.
    I hold Car, Motorbike and Coach licences. Also via VR Sea Cadets: RYA Day Skipper, Power Boat and safety certs, ME II, FAW Instr & Assessor (within MS-SC, music - snare drum and brass.
    Many varied jobs incl coach driving between divorces... No. 3 is brill. No 1 set precedence in divorce law lol - Mayes vs Mayes '83/'84 - was mentally ill. Has two grown children with whom I am still in touch albeit twice a year.
    Three kids - Daughter (32)is in top of DnB DJ - 'Missrepresent' - sadly we don't talk much - she is manic depressive like her father but I love her and am very proud of her.
    Two sons from No 2 - now 22 and 24 both settling with lovely girlfriends and in decent jobs - design engineering machinery. Also staying close by for extra cupboard food!!
    They get on very well with my Dave.
    Their father and step mum near too but not 'close' in true sense however loyal - and they have a younger half brother.
    You will see my background on dogs - via my WHW breeding etc...on forum posts.
    I mean well but know I can come across quite strong & opinionated - a chip off my mother's block!! Very determined strong woman.
  • Interests
    Brass Band. Musher, Cruiser & caravan camper.

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  1. You've got the right idea.. just be quiet firm and in control. Into another room in solitary ie, rejection. No words, nada. This is early teenage sign of dominance and bossing. In a pack they'd be stood over and held down under snarling threat until they gave in like "hey, no big deal.. I'm good.." and they've learned their place in the hierarchy. If you have to drag him out you drag him out. A few minutes or ten in solitary and you let him out. If he starts again be swift and remove.. no words. When he comes in wagging, licking, sniffing but not biting, jumping on or standing over, immediately praise and reward 'good dog..be nice' with a treat. He'll learn pretty fast. Successdogs.com is a great training site.. free ebook but more to download and get started. They get bigger and more wily fast. Really should start from day one when they come into your home. xxx
  2. Yep - one action. I use this and only this: so, Every time she does this clip on a lead and walk her out of the room into another in 'solitary'. No words, no other action. Once settled down, and quiet, let her back into the social gathering whether with you alone or a group. As soon as she starts again, or with anything resembling 'unacceptable' behaviour, show her instant 'rejection' by removing her from the room. No words, nowt. When she behaves nicely, praise lots 'Good girl! Be Nice!' and give a small reward. Eventually 'Be nice' becomes the trigger for good behaviour. -------------- In a pack she'd either be nipped by mum or an elder. This behaviour happens because pups leave the litter pack too early and social behaviour has not been learnt! There is a huge difference between eight/nine weeks and 12 week old pups (the latter) that have stayed with mum) as she house trains them, socialises them in correct behaviour and, they learn more about their world so are far more confident. Sadly it is lack of training, KNOWLEDGE & RESEARCH that results in so many dogs being given up/abandoned because of behaviour just like this. Huskies are fast in learning, highly intelligent and inventive too, and NEED early positive reward guidance. They also grow big fast! Successdogs.com for all positive reward training & some tricks too. πŸ€—
  3. Distract.. then when quiet, reward. I use 'chill' with my two. I also bought an anti bark device that works brill on my girl; my boy tends to whine - as she is the more dog reactive one. Use it in small bursts. It is amazing on other dogs that bark at them tho', and shuts them up fast! That takes the aggro off mine so peace reigns! Like kids, distraction and refocussing their attention stops unwanted behaviour WITH positive reward training. A dog chew or bone might also help.πŸ€— Successdogs.com. and Absolutedogs.com Distract.. then when quiet, reward. I use 'chill' with my two. I also bought an anti bark device that works brill on my girl; my boy tends to whine - as she is the more dog reactive one. Use it in small bursts. It is amazing on other dogs that bark at them tho', and shuts them up fast! That takes the aggro off mine so peace reigns! Like kids, distraction and refocussing their attention stops unwanted behaviour WITH positive reward training. A dog chew or bone might also help.πŸ€—
  4. Nine weeks is very young. Patience. And you're expecting the moon so soon! Lol. First .. get her to know her name by calling and patting your knees or get down on the floor and patting the floor. As soon as she runs hold treat in front saying her name '..... and sit'! and then hold treat up over her nose to make her look up, go back and ... sit. . Reward instantly. It can take thirty reps to get a new trick into them but don't do longer than a couple of minutes. Leave for 30 mins ... and play ball or a gentle tug game.. saying 'leave' and holding a small treat to distract get them to let go and reward immediately. Even play becomes training by positive reward enforcement. Successdogs.com and Absolutedogs.com sites are both very good. I have worked from the first .. with good results on mine. πŸ€—
  5. Good advice. In pup training I would pick up 'accident' poops and take outside to the specific area I wanted them to poop. Then pick up again shortly after. Positive reward enforcement too certainly helps - small treat within three seconds of every good deed. Ignore the bad, praise the good. [emoji847] Sent from my [device_name] using http://Husky Owners mobile app
  6. https://www.husky-owners.com/forum/topic/59948-pics-of-your-dogs-right-now/?page=108&tab=comments#comment-1059048 Try this. There have been issues with very slow however it seems to be working fine for me on my Samsung S7. πŸ€—
  7. You will need to start from scratch. And over a long weekend to concentrate in this but every day otherwise when at home. If necessary feed earlier so you do have time to do this if you're heading out to work A.M. Keep back door shut. Take her out on a lead within 15-20 mins post meal. Walk her round the back until she goes. (I use 'Be Quick/Be Clean, outside' for wee/poop.) As soon as she does go, big praise/fuss and..reward. Or, go out on a walk (with poop bags, & treats). Same positive reward training . If/when she goes, praise using the right term & reward. Keep the door shut until she has been. If you catch her in the act of pooping indoors scare her off with a loud 'NO! BE CLEAN/BE QUICK OUTSIDE!' (Use whichever term is appropriate to what she was doing .. And promptly take her outside . And shut the door. I also use mind 'telepathy' if mine poop too near the house as I prefer mine to use one 'area' only .. I think & concentrate good thoughts during daily 'pickup' when they have pooped where I want them and as strong displeasure when they have pooped in an unfavourable place. It seems to work 90% ! Diluting areas on the lawn with watering can where they pee also helps stop grass yellowing and Dog Rocks are very good too. Google for these. Hope this helps. Huskies really want to please you as do all canines. Leaving the litter at 8/9 weeks does not give mum time to house train them in the litter pack, or teach them proper socialising - hence many issues with behaviour, dominance, lack of confidence -> defensive/aggressive reactive dogs. Also.. look at Successdogs.com & Absolutedogs.com πŸ€—
  8. Who's coming and anyone arriving on Friday? About to book @ Ty Mawr for a spot in The Warren field. [emoji16] Sent from my [device_name] using http://Husky Owners mobile app
  9. To avoid this dominant behaviour which is very common in small pups and older dogs, if it hasn't been curbed, you clip on a lead and walk them quietly from the room; no words; just put them into another room and shut the door; give them three or four minutes, provided all is quiet.. wait for them to be quiet.. then come back in and let them out no lead; the minute they start again you click them on walk them out. This is rejection to them; their behaviour is undesirable so they're being removed. The mum in a litter pack would pick up a pup that was being over boisterous or over rough and remove it from the rest of the Pack repeatedly and this is where they learn their social manners .. so you're going to have to do this now. It works with any undesirable behaviour that you don't want and if you have to muzzle them - even that would be a last resort in my case, but they would soon learn that they lose freedom when they are misbehaving or acting in a bad light to you .. you're in charge.. good luck.. this should work just be consistent. The minute they start behaving nicely when they come back into the room you can reward immediately with a little treat (make sure you have them in your pocket) and say 'good dog be nice' .. if they start misbehaving again no words clip-on the lead walk them out. Goid Luck! Successdigs.com Absolutedogs.com Training will reward both !
  10. Hi and welcome to this awesome group. My training with this regime is this and it works very well. To introduce any dog or pup to something new, you need to go slow & steady; the first thing you do and when you have a few days clear, you start from the beginning; you throw a treat into the crate (which can be partly covered over the top 1/3rd to create a 'den' and you then wait for him or her to go in; as soon as they start to pick it up and eat, you close the door quietly. When they've finished you praise them and say 'good dog! in bed,' and then you let them out; you leave it for a while and you repeat the process, all the time leaving them just a little bit longer so they begin to realise (a d trust) is not a bad place but it's a safe place for them to go and they can get a treat at the same time; if they're really good and stay, wait for them to look at you and then say 'yes! come' and when they come out with encouragement, you reward and praise. Gradually, you can keep increasing the time span and you can walk away for a few seconds; this takes quite a few days and up to 30 repetitions to start getting in to them that it's a safe place to go. Later you go out of sight but just increase the seconds to minutes very slowly. If they don't have 24/7 access outside it is actually harder. My two dogs will go in and sit in the crate; they have an XXXL crate so the two of them (huskyxmalamutes) can fit in; it's not ideal for long-term but I can put them both in and they settle down to wait. I don't have to lock them in when I go out because they have access 24/7 outside to a very large run with outdoor shelters however all the doors in my bungalow are shut and just one door from the inner hall to kitchen is open so there is just access for them in there, around their beds or crate area and the kitchen; If that's the best way out of the house and your garden is secure, ie with 6 ft high fences then you could install a dog flap and if it's secure enough that they can't get over or out, and nobody can get in (so ensure there are locks on Gates etc), then you should feel reasonably safe with them being able to exit via a dog flap. I would also work on this going out of the house for short periods making it all a 'no big deal'. Giving them a frozen carrot in their crate just before you go gets them focused on this. Put the radio on, remove any edibles of counters (bread & fruit in oven or microwave πŸ˜‰) and ensure the bins are nor accessible .. I have a silent closing one as mine would suss out a sensor opening in no time! The repetition training (for all training in new stuff) has to continue with encouraging them to go into the crate; if you're looking to shut them in long term when you go to work and @ bedtime that's going to take longer especially as they are not pets - they want to be near you as a companion; mine sleep in the hall outside the bedroom but they have access in once my husband goes to work and then they can come up and join me on the bed; I have a throw over it. Look at successdogs.com and absolutedogs.com for all the training skills ... and disciplines through positive reward training. πŸ€— Good luck!
  11. It's a part of early dominance which in a litter pack if they stay with mum they learn to socialise. What you do is clip on a lead, lead her out of the room, put her in another quiet room alone for five minutes. They learn fast.. and after a few repetitions she should stop this.. don't speak or chastise. When she comes in and sniffs politely, praise her with 'yes! be nice' and reward. Successdogs.com and absolutedogs.com for training....asap. πŸ€—
  12. Maz51

    Hello

    Welcome to this awesome forum. Milo sounds amazing.. My girl is dog reactive and I'm going through de-sensitisation by keeping her on a short lead in dogmatic head collars; this gives me much better head control on my two who are both over 80 lbs! My boy Chester now whines and Eski will still bark and try to get to other dogs however I hold her tight and make her turn away from them to LOOK at me as i say 'Leave' or 'On By / Go By' (used when we run in the rig to tell them to ignore / over take). She is incredibly stubborn and takes much longer to 'listen and learn'. I think her history before I got her aged 2 1/2 was mixed and she may have been attacked too. She came with possessiveness (had been around other breeds of dogs), jealousy (insecure), and guarding over food. I've worked hard over the past two+ years and they both can and respond to tricks and lying down & waiting .. and waiting .. before going to their food bowls on verbal cimmand or hand signals. Otherwise she's an angel.πŸ€— I can recommend successdogs.com. I use all positive reward training MO and it works.. with consistency, persistency, and every treat is 'earned' in doing something, whether Gee/Haw (spin/turn right/left), sit, paw, high five, down, say please (they wrruff or bark). Chester is very good and can pick up & take toys to a bowl or back to his bed. He can fetch too. (Always rewarded.) It takes a min of 30 reps to get a a new instruction 'in' and then repeat again over days & weeks. Remember to adjust feed if a lot of treats are given and I suggest thtee - four trng sessions a day..with play time ones too. πŸ€—
  13. Emma has covered this very well. My first thought was that she may be in pain. Can you observe her walking and moving around? Is she slower or more stiff? Does she favour lying on one side more than the other? Is her appetite still ok? If you suspect anything a vet checkover is certainly advisable and I'd muzzle her for everyone's sake when being examined. If she has been pulled or had her fur yanked.. this would certainly cause a reaction to being handled by anyone. I hope you can resolve this. I suspect pain.. more than anything else.. maybe her back or hips... πŸ€—
  14. Emma has covered this very well. My first thought was that she may be in pain. Can you observe her walking and moving around? Is she slower or more stiff? Does she favour lying on one side more than the other? Is her appetite still ok? If you suspect anything a vet checkover is certainly advisable and I'd muzzle her for everyone's sake when being examined. If she has been pulled or had her fur yanked.. this would certainly cause a reaction to being handled by anyone. I hope you can resolve this. I suspect pain.. more than anything else.. maybe her back or hips... πŸ€—
  15. That is sooo good! But remember YOU need training too to do it right with the furkids as well. You continue at home what they have been taught with their trainer.. and practice anywhere and everywhere 😁 xxx
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