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potty training housetrain

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#1 dewittsc

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 23:38 (11:38 PM)

Folks:
 
I am the proud new owner of a husky pup.  Pup is female, 10wks old, born on 10/15 and arrived at my house Xmas day.  Was purchased from a breeder next state over and is triple papered (AKC/CKC/AP??).  I have done a lot of research and homework on how to train my little girl.  I have LOTS of questions but I will try to keep it just to two or three for now.  I really appreciate any and all help anyone can provide so thanks so much in advance and happy holidays!
 
1. She urinates in the house -constantly-.  It is literally almost every 15 minutes, sometimes even closer together.  It's to the point where I have to follow her around every second just in case she go's and try to clap/say NO to interrupt her, pick her up and take her straight to her potty spot.
 
She is also going poop in the house as well.  I believe I have been following a good routine based on everything I've read yet she still does not go outside very often (it has happened a couple of times for which I've praised and given her treats). 
 
* I take her out first thing in the am, before bed in pm, after naps, and after meals.  
* I give treats and praise right as she is going if it does happen outside.
* I never raise my voice or do anything negative or rub her nose in it when she has an accident (probably 6-7 times a day so far).  
* I take her on two 1 mile walks per day.  
* I have tried the scent cloth thing.
* I crate at night and for naps in a large crate with a divider to try and discourage her from going where she sleeps (yet she has done it anyway)
 
So between rushing her out on every accident, the walks, the potty trips, the following her around the house, and the cleanup, I can't get anything else done.  I absolutely know that having a pup requires a lot of time but I do have a job and a family so at some point (like when I go back to work after xmas) I have no idea what will happen.  
 
- I realize it has only been two days, but does anyone have ANY ideas/advice/suggestions?  
- Is this normal?
- Am I doing something wrong?  
- Might she have bladder issues (I've read she should be able to hold it her age in months plus 1 - so at least 2 hours - we're talking not even 10 minutes sometimes between one accident and the next).
 
I have absolutely no problem investing time to walk her, take her potty, etc and since I work at home it's not a huge deal.  But I can't have her monopolizing my job and risking my work.  I can't imagine others do either since there are plenty of successfull husky owners in the world and we all have to work for a living.
 
2. Just this evening I was outside at her potty spot trying to get her to go by throwing some balls to her.  She got pretty excited and started doing the whole "head shaking thing they do to rip apart prey" (not sure what that's called) with it pretty fiercely.  I said No several times firmly.  I then decided what a good leader would do (as I would with my kids) is just remove her from the situation to a timeout.  When I went to pick her up in the middle of her tizzy she definitely did more then nip at me and was growling and yipping at me kinda like a wolf (I get it, they are descendants).  She didn't break the skin but she came close.  I have 6 kids and I can't tolerate this kind of behavior for the safety of my children.  
 
- Was this normal for a young untrained husky pup?
- What could/should I have done differently?
 
Frustrated and concerned, and appreciating ANY advice/help,
Scott
 




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Posted 28 December 2013 - 00:29 (12:29 AM)

Hello Scott, Welcome from the wide open spaces of West Texas!!! << excuse me as I laugh >>

Let's first off say that it sounds like you've got a perfectly normal pup << another laugh!, sorry >>

You've got a lot of things going on. She is a puppy and they're just like a little kid ( you said you have six of those, so I presume you know what I mean! ) Then nice part to this is that they grow up a lot faster!!

A big part of what you're seeing is that she's new to you and everything is new to her.

Item number 1, you've got a good handle on what to do to potty train her, but that's not going to happen overnight. If she learns quickly, you're still looking at (probably) a couple of months before she's reasonably regular and probably closer to six before she's dependable. You've got the routine down, take her out when she potties in the house; take her out a few minutes after each meal; take her out after an exercise period; oh, shoot - if you think puppy, just go ahead and take her out!
It sounds to me as if the breeder left them on their own and cleaned up after them,probably once or twice a day, so she's (probably) not used to this idea of not going when she thinks she needs to (and remember she has a tiny little bladder so it fills up real quick!) When it finally sinks in to her that "inside" is where she lives then she'll do her thing outside ... if I'm reading that right, you say that she has not messed in the crate, so she knows not to mess in "her House" now it's a matter of teaching her that she doesn't get to mess in your house and you're doing it right.

Item number two: you might have noticed, puppy's don't have hands - right?? So they do everything with their mouths - and that includes those sharp little puppy teeth!  OUCH!! What you don't say is what you did after she nipped at you ... I'm going to assume that you put her in a time out. 

Well, gee guy, you interrupted something that she thought was great fun and she objected in the only way she knows how!  One of the things that puppies learn in the last couple of weeks with their siblings is something called bite inhibition.  That's the process of learning what their teeth are and how hard they can bite in play if they bite a sibling too hard, they yelp and go away ... obviously you're going to have to finish the lesson that got interrupted when she left the pack.  Normally the best way to handle that it to say "no!" (( notice the emphasis, you don't just say "no" you want something loud enough that they're going to respond,  kinda like you do with one of the human kind when they're totally ignoring you. )) And then leave her alone (time out) for a few minutes.

I'm going to also assume, for your benefit, that if she did not break the skin, she probably has a pretty good handle on bite inhibition - she was just letting you know she was unhappy.  You just have to let her know you were unhappier!!

 

As I said earlier, most everything to do with humans is pretty new to her; since you have a few kids there you can probably expect a few scratches (( they wouldn't be kids and puppies if they didn't )) You do need to enlist the older kids at least in helping you teach her how hard she can play (and if you've read around here, Husky's play rough!) with which of the kids.  You all have to be operating "on the same page" so that when the play gets too rough you can all agree that now is the time for time out - don't depend on Daddy being around all the time to keep her behaving.

 

I'm writing a book again,  Welcome to the forum and since most of Europe has gone to bed, you can expect to see a few of us here in the US responding to you for the next few hours.  Enjoy, I envy you the pup and the kids 'cause you've got a lot of fun coming your way!!!  << and yes, I'm still laughing!! >>


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#3 dewittsc

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 01:33 (01:33 AM)

Al:

 

THANK YOU for your quick response.  It is at least a little comforting to know everything seems fairly normal.  A couple of comments/clarifications on your responses:

 

1. Laughing OK and probably warranted.  Hopefully I will laugh about it soon too.

2. Just after I wrote this post, I took her for a 15 minute walk and she pooped outside!! YAY for small successes!

3. She did pee in the crate twice, but not poop.  I cleaned it up and used the Nature's Magic to try and rid the smell per what I've read.

 

And a couple of follow on questions if I may (and if I mayn't, then please pardon me).

 

1. Some other experienced owners commented that 1 mile twice a day is probably too much for a pup of her age and that walks should only be 15 min at her age.  My miles (with her stopping every 5 seconds) have been more like 45 minutes.  Is that too long?

2. I asked the breeder how much "latitude" she should have to begin with outside the crate.  We have been giving her the run of the first floor (approx 1500 sq ft).  She said that was way too much and suggested confining to a particular room or part of a room like laundry/bathroom/etc.  Problem is we have a very open landscape house and there isn't much we can do to cordon off one room from another.  With your experience, what is your opinion on this?  I was thinking maybe we could get one of those sets of doggie gates that make a circle/hexagon?

3. When I do take her outside after an accident, a) I almost never get her before she's done and B) she never goes outside after since she's already gone.  How long should I wait on typical potty missions outside (accident or not)?

4. I know this will sound stupid so laugh away... But what should I do with her in the times when she isn't in her crate and I'm not walking with her or outside waiting for her to pee?  As I mentioned, I've taken to following her around the house trying to "catch" her before she has that next accident.  Again I get that puppies are an investment of time, but that just isn't realistic for me.  I do have a job I have to do and 6 kids and a wife to also attend to.  At the same time, I don't want to keep her in her crate all day.  That wouldn't be right or fair either.  But if I don't do my job, eventually i get fired, and she doesn't get fed.  Hence the whole gated pen type of thing again - at least until she's mostly trained up.

 

Thanks again SO MUCH for your response.  I really do appreciate it!!!  Happy holidays!

 

Scott



#4 Chula

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 02:25 (02:25 AM)

When she's that young she probably does need to go out every thirty minutes or so. Lavish her with praise and treats when she goes outside. But it needs to be right as she's doing it or she won't connect the praise with the action.

I do think that you're walking her too far for her age. I'd split your walks up into 15-20 minutes at the most. Tire her out with mental stimulation, like training or chew toys.
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#5 Chula

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 02:27 (02:27 AM)

And honestly, in the first few weeks, puppies really need someone who can be with them constantly. I know that's not what you want to hear, but it's the only way they will learn what is expected of them. You are her only guide.
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#6 Chula

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 02:32 (02:32 AM)

As for the nipping, I'm sorry to say that being mouthy is a breed trait. They play hard. Mine still is mouthy and she's a year old. Work on bite inhibition as Al suggested, but also keep up with timeouts and ignoring when she tries to get attention by nipping.

Huskies are a lot of work. She will probably get more difficult before she gets easier. Consistency in training and giving her alternative things to chew on will help.
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#7 Mazz

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 03:27 (03:27 AM)

Hi Scott, and welcome. Huskies are pack oriented animals, and they need that environment to develop and to thrive. The pack, you, your wife, the six kids, and the new pup, all have to adjust. We got Zoya when she was nine weeks old. I used the rule of thumb that for every month of age, it was one hour of bladder retention. Not always accurate, but seemed to be close. We crated her at night, in our room. I got up every two hours every night to take her outside. Then it was every two and a half hours, then three, etc. During the day, same thing. If she messed in the house, and I caught her in the act, I would pick her up and take her outside, even if she was done. This helps associate outside is where you go potty. You just have to be consistent. If nothing happens in five to ten minutes return inside. Don't get upset if there is a setback, because it will happen. With Zoya, she was letting us know within two weeks, hey! I gotta go potty. Here is sort of the schedule I used with Zoya.

Wake up - take her out
Breakfast - wait five to ten minutes and take her out
Every hour and a half to two hours - take her out
Playtime - take her out right after
Lunch - wait five to ten minutes and take her out
Nap time wake up - take her out
Training - take her out right after
Dinner - wait five to ten minutes and take her out
Pull water at 8:00 pm
Take her out before bed time
Take her out every two hours through the night

We had to work during the day, so we put Zoya in a large kennel in our basement. I picked up a transmission catch pan. It's like a big cookie sheet with a lip all around. Put pee pads in that for her during the day.

Don't get discouraged too quickly. It is a lot of work at first, but the effort will be worth it. Huskies are wonderful animals. Do the best you can. Take it one day at a time. And as more questions come up, we are here.
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#8 dewittsc

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 03:58 (03:58 AM)

When she's that young she probably does need to go out every thirty minutes or so. Lavish her with praise and treats when she goes outside. But it needs to be right as she's doing it or she won't connect the praise with the action.

I do think that you're walking her too far for her age. I'd split your walks up into 15-20 minutes at the most. Tire her out with mental stimulation, like training or chew toys.

 

Thanks Ms Emily, I will keep up with the potty techniques we've been using b/c it sounds like it's on the right track and I will cut back a bit on the walks.

 

And honestly, in the first few weeks, puppies really need someone who can be with them constantly. I know that's not what you want to hear, but it's the only way they will learn what is expected of them. You are her only guide.

 

So I hear what you are saying.  And I mean this in the nicest way possible.  But like we all have jobs right?  How can anyone possibly do this?  It's not like you can say "hey I can't come into work the next three weeks b/c I have to train my puppy".  At least I've never known anyone to do this and I know plenty of folks who have owned puppies.  So I guess my question is what do -those- people do?

 

As for the nipping, I'm sorry to say that being mouthy is a breed trait. They play hard. Mine still is mouthy and she's a year old. Work on bite inhibition as Al suggested, but also keep up with timeouts and ignoring when she tries to get attention by nipping.

Huskies are a lot of work. She will probably get more difficult before she gets easier. Consistency in training and giving her alternative things to chew on will help.

 

Yup, I totally get they are a lot of work!  And experiencing it first hand!  I know it will be worth it.  Most of my kids are mouthy too.  And I keep them anyway.  Al's post about the bite inhibition i think made me feel better about this.

She definitely didn't break the skin and I'm sure she could have if she had wanted to.

 

Hi Scott, and welcome. Huskies are pack oriented animals, and they need that environment to develop and to thrive. The pack, you, your wife, the six kids, and the new pup, all have to adjust. We got Zoya when she was nine weeks old. I used the rule of thumb that for every month of age, it was one hour of bladder retention. Not always accurate, but seemed to be close. We crated her at night, in our room. I got up every two hours every night to take her outside. Then it was every two and a half hours, then three, etc. During the day, same thing. If she messed in the house, and I caught her in the act, I would pick her up and take her outside, even if she was done. This helps associate outside is where you go potty. You just have to be consistent. If nothing happens in five to ten minutes return inside. Don't get upset if there is a setback, because it will happen. With Zoya, she was letting us know within two weeks, hey! I gotta go potty. Here is sort of the schedule I used with Zoya.

Wake up - take her out
Breakfast - wait five to ten minutes and take her out
Every hour and a half to two hours - take her out
Playtime - take her out right after
Lunch - wait five to ten minutes and take her out
Nap time wake up - take her out
Training - take her out right after
Dinner - wait five to ten minutes and take her out
Pull water at 8:00 pm
Take her out before bed time
Take her out every two hours through the night

We had to work during the day, so we put Zoya in a large kennel in our basement. I picked up a transmission catch pan. It's like a big cookie sheet with a lip all around. Put pee pads in that for her during the day.

Don't get discouraged too quickly. It is a lot of work at first, but the effort will be worth it. Huskies are wonderful animals. Do the best you can. Take it one day at a time. And as more questions come up, we are here.

 

Thanks Dave!!!  It is good to hear that other people have struggled with the "hey, I have to work" problem while raising a puppy.  When you say large kennel, can you shoot me a link to what you mean?  I do have a basement so I could potentially do that.  Someone is typically always at home here (especially over the next few weeks) the issue is just that no one really wants to follow her around every step she takes all day long.  I mean I didn't even do that for my kids (yay play pens).

 

Thanks again everyone for your great support!!!!



#9 Mazz

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:21 (04:21 AM)

Scott, the "kennel" is actually the alcove under the stairs that come down into the basement. We have a finished family room, so one side of the stairs has a wall. The other side of the stairs also has a wall with shelving to the outside. The opening of the alcove is in the laundry room. So we have a six foot high chain link gate across the opening. It measures four feet wide by about seven useable feet long. It was a godsend with our first Husky, as well as when Zoya was a pup. We also would put a radio nearby set to the local NPR station. We had a water jug used for rabbits that we mounted to the gate. Zoya is going on six years, so she has the run of the house along with Eisa when we are gone.

Got any pics of this hell raiser you can post up?
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#10 Mobezilla

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:31 (04:31 AM)

So I hear what you are saying.  And I mean this in the nicest way possible.  But like we all have jobs right?  How can anyone possibly do this?  It's not like you can say "hey I can't come into work the next three weeks b/c I have to train my puppy".  At least I've never known anyone to do this and I know plenty of folks who have owned puppies.  So I guess my question is what do -those- people do?

 

I just wanted to touch on this - the first two weeks I had Yuki I did request those days off, I saved my money up properly beforehand and literally requested those days off under 'getting new puppy'. My managers understood. Then when I went back to work I had a friend watch her the next couple weeks. Puppies can't be crated for very long, so after the first month, she went to a private in-home daycare until she was old enough to be crated for my entire work-shift. This obviously won't work for everyone, but she can only hold it for 1 hour per month of age, so she needs someone to constantly take her out in order for her to be successful :) I would consider hiring a dog-walker or ask a neighbor to check in on the pup while you're at work. Hope some of this helps!


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#11 Mazz

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 05:38 (05:38 AM)

Scott, I've been giving your situation some thought this evening. I think once you are into this for a week or so, you will and your pup will, have adjusted to some sort of routine and it really won't be as overwhelming as it may seem right now. I think what really helped when Zoya first came home, was we interacted with her as much as we had time available. It's fine to say that you need to spend every day for the first few weeks with a new puppy. But the reality is, that is not always possible. We had three full days with Zoya, then we had to leave for work. She did fine. We did fine. It worked out. Today, she is not only a beautiful Husky, she is a wonderful companion and a real joy.

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#12 BingBlaze n Skyla

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:37 (08:37 AM)

Welcome to the pack can't really add much as to what's been posted already but you've only had her a few days so patience really is key here, it took my 2 5-7 months to be fully housetrained

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#13 Chula

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 12:54 (12:54 PM)

The fact that you work from home should make it easier. Mine had company at home for about the first week, then she was crated and let out several times a day. My other half and I tend to work opposite hours during the winter so he was with her a lot of the second week. We didn't have the option of a gated off room so we really needed to spend the first week with her to get her pottying in the right place.

And obviously people with jobs have huskies, but I do think you should be prepared for having to rearrange some aspects of your life. Unless you are lucky enough to have a super laid back husky, they really do demand a lot of attention. Are your kids old enough to help with the training and exercise? That would be helpful.

I agree that patience is probably your best friend right now. Have reasonable expectations for your baby and I'm sure she won't let you down. :)

Edited by Chula, 28 December 2013 - 13:20 (01:20 PM).

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 15:27 (03:27 PM)

One thing I meant to add to my post last night - and it's one I recommend often for situations just such as yours - get a short leash, 2 - 3 feet long and leave it on her for the next couple of months (yes, I said months!) It's a great way to keep track of what she's up to.

In the situation where you got nipped - if she'd had a leash on her, you could have just put some tension of the leash ( "Okay, that's enough of that! Come this way!" ) don't jerk on it, we don't want to hurt young bones but a little constant tension will move her in the direction you want her to go.

Unless you're on the phone all day ( had a friend who worked from home for AMEX ) you can put the end of the leash under a chair leg and she's right there, when she needs to go out, you should see some sign ( sniffing, restless, etc )

Somewhat dangerous questions: Is this your pup or a family pup?  How old are your kids and are they involved in her training / play time?

As Em<?> said, Husky's a pack animals and will want to be involved with everyone / everything that's going on, if your kids are old enough ( how old are they, btw ) you really should have them involved.

 

An adult dog, has the intelligence of a 4 - 5 year old child ( they just can't communicate quite as well ), you can probably figure that what you're dealing with is the equivalent of a 9 month - 1 year old child and, probably, treat her about the same.  You've got six human variety kids, you've just added a furry one, in a lot of ways, you'll probably find they aren't a lot different!



#15 Erinc

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 16:36 (04:36 PM)

I have not read all the replies but here is my contribution!

 

Your pup is normal, she has only been home for a very short time and she really does need to settle in first before she can start taking in all the rules. Thats not to say you shouldn't keep doing what you're doing, consistency is key and every time you think you are going around in circles, do not worry, you're not!

 

If you're spending more time outside than inside trying to make sure she has no accidents then you are doing the right thing. The first week, two weeks, 6 months are going to be tuff and they are going to require your almost full time commitment.

 

This is just my opinion but the whole 'shaking head to rip up prey' thing they do is so normal. I do not see why you think you have to tell her off for that. I'd let her get on with it, train it to a command (this can be fun), when I play tug of war with mine I actually encourage him to do that! You are certainly worrying over nothing.

 

Just remember that lots of socialisation with other dogs and people is what will teach her her manners not telling her off for playing with her toys.

 

Most importantly, love her, enjoy her! They don't stay that little for long and you'll never take enough pictures sure you take as many as possible!!! Oh, and videos! Don't forget videos!!!

 

Good Luck

 

edit. and of course Merry Christmas and obviously Happy New Year!

 

ooh, edit edit.

 

I just re-read, i missed the bit where she snapped at you.

 

You really need to take charge and so does the rest of your family, she needs to know she's at the bottom of this particular hierarchy. That is super easy at the moment because she is a little pup. Make sure everyone enforces the same rules, if one person does not, then she will pick up on this, they are far from stupid and will take advantage if they are allowed to!

 

A firm no, removing her from the room, pinning her down till she's calm, stopping play, bitting her ear? all of these work in my opinion and so does a bunch of other stuff so pick what works for you and your family and stick to it.


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#16 dewittsc

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 18:39 (06:39 PM)

Wow, THANK YOU everyone for your support.  I will respond to some of these things more in a bit and try and get some pics up.  She is a female red and is just gorgeous as all get out.  Last night went well (hope you don't my updates - if you do let me know and i'll shut up) - I woke with her every 2 hrs and she peed outside each time.  Today is more of the same though - a lot of accidents in the house, rushing her outside only for her to do nothing since she did it all in the house.  But she can sit like a champ on cue!  Thanks again everyone for your help.



#17 Mike101

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 18:51 (06:51 PM)

Welcome to HO ...nothing I can say that hasn't already been said by much more experienced husky owners than me. except.... They grow up into the most wonderful , friendly, exasperating, funny lovable characters you could ever possibly want to know. and when I say characters.. you will see what I mean as you get to know her :)


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#18 BingBlaze n Skyla

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 19:15 (07:15 PM)

Personally would not pin her down or bite her ear , that's just asking for trouble imo
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#19 dewittsc

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 19:46 (07:46 PM)

I just wanted to touch on this - the first two weeks I had Yuki I did request those days off, I saved my money up properly beforehand and literally requested those days off under 'getting new puppy'. My managers understood. Then when I went back to work I had a friend watch her the next couple weeks. Puppies can't be crated for very long, so after the first month, she went to a private in-home daycare until she was old enough to be crated for my entire work-shift. This obviously won't work for everyone, but she can only hold it for 1 hour per month of age, so she needs someone to constantly take her out in order for her to be successful :) I would consider hiring a dog-walker or ask a neighbor to check in on the pup while you're at work. Hope some of this helps!

 

I stand corrected - but I will say you are the first person I've ever heard do that AND you must have awesome managers.

 

Scott, I've been giving your situation some thought this evening. I think once you are into this for a week or so, you will and your pup will, have adjusted to some sort of routine and it really won't be as overwhelming as it may seem right now. I think what really helped when Zoya first came home, was we interacted with her as much as we had time available. It's fine to say that you need to spend every day for the first few weeks with a new puppy. But the reality is, that is not always possible. We had three full days with Zoya, then we had to leave for work. She did fine. We did fine. It worked out. Today, she is not only a beautiful Husky, she is a wonderful companion and a real joy.

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Dave:  THANK YOU for this.  I knew there would be work and I signed up for that, but as you said, reality is I have to work.  By tomorrow I actually will have had 5 full days with her.  And I will be working at home all week so that will help.

 

The fact that you work from home should make it easier. Mine had company at home for about the first week, then she was crated and let out several times a day. My other half and I tend to work opposite hours during the winter so he was with her a lot of the second week. We didn't have the option of a gated off room so we really needed to spend the first week with her to get her pottying in the right place.

And obviously people with jobs have huskies, but I do think you should be prepared for having to rearrange some aspects of your life. Unless you are lucky enough to have a super laid back husky, they really do demand a lot of attention. Are your kids old enough to help with the training and exercise? That would be helpful.

I agree that patience is probably your best friend right now. Have reasonable expectations for your baby and I'm sure she won't let you down. :)

 

I hear you, I do.  I have 6 kids so I get having to rearrange lives.  I've done it at least 6 times plus I guess 1 time for getting married. :-)  My kids are indeed old enough to help.  I have two older kids that are being helpful.  The younger ones are also helping but tend to get scared when she starts to get lively. :-)  Thanks again for the advice/help.

 

One thing I meant to add to my post last night - and it's one I recommend often for situations just such as yours - get a short leash, 2 - 3 feet long and leave it on her for the next couple of months (yes, I said months!) It's a great way to keep track of what she's up to.

In the situation where you got nipped - if she'd had a leash on her, you could have just put some tension of the leash ( "Okay, that's enough of that! Come this way!" ) don't jerk on it, we don't want to hurt young bones but a little constant tension will move her in the direction you want her to go.

Unless you're on the phone all day ( had a friend who worked from home for AMEX ) you can put the end of the leash under a chair leg and she's right there, when she needs to go out, you should see some sign ( sniffing, restless, etc )

Somewhat dangerous questions: Is this your pup or a family pup?  How old are your kids and are they involved in her training / play time?

As Em<?> said, Husky's a pack animals and will want to be involved with everyone / everything that's going on, if your kids are old enough ( how old are they, btw ) you really should have them involved.

 

An adult dog, has the intelligence of a 4 - 5 year old child ( they just can't communicate quite as well ), you can probably figure that what you're dealing with is the equivalent of a 9 month - 1 year old child and, probably, treat her about the same.  You've got six human variety kids, you've just added a furry one, in a lot of ways, you'll probably find they aren't a lot different!

 

Thanks for this input!  So the biggest issue right now is that tomorrow starts back the work week and though I will be home she can't have my every minute. I have gotten input from a bunch of folks and I would really appreciate the advice of you all. Basically I see a couple of options.

1. Should I keep her in her crate at all times between potty breaks until she learns? (this seems somewhat cruel but it has been suggested to me)
2. Several people (including here) have suggested to me to keep her on leash at all times until she is potty trained and have that leash under a chair leg or something while I am working - that way I can see when she starts to get restless or starts sniffing or some sign of having to go and take her right out
3. Another option is to get some sort of doggie gates that can act as a sort of "kennel"/"pen" and have her in there until she is potty trained.
4. Just let her have the run of the first floor (which is what we have been doing thus far) and deal with the zillions of places she will have an accident.  My breeder was pretty clear she thought giving her the run of the house was a bad idea at this stage so leaning away from this one.

What do you think??

 

THANKS again for your input... really really appreciate it. Thanks for taking the time to help others. It means a lot.


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#20 Mazz

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 20:29 (08:29 PM)

Scott, if you have carpet, you may want to get one of these:

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We have an earlier model and it makes cleanup a snap.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Huskies in the Heartland

Visit Zoya's Web Site at: http://zoyathehusky.webs.com/




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